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I have traders that are evaluated on a regular basis. The evaluations have a foreign key to the trader. I want to list all the traders along with their current evaluation status. This is possible using a custom property added to the Trader model. However, I want to be able to filter the results on the status of the latest evaluation (for example, all those current evaluations that are still open). However, as has been shown before (Custom properties in a query), you can't include a custom model property in a query.

I would have created a foreign key in the Trader model, that records that id of the most current Evaluation, however, that's not possible, because then the models will reference each other, and then you get into an circular ordering problem when creating the classes, ie Trader refers to Evaluation, but Evaluation hasn't been declared yet, or putting Evaluation first, yet Trader isn't declared.

So far I assumed that I would use Trader as my base query, and lookup the Evaluations. I thought an alternative to get around the problem would be to create a query based on Evaluation, and then lookup Traders instead. However, this means that those Traders who have not been evaluated yet, would never appear in results (unless I made sure that Traders always have at least one Evaluation record). Or I suppose I could resort to using raw SQL.

Any suggestions on how to go about solving this would be greatly appreciated.

Here are the models:

Class Trader(models.Model):
    territory = models.ForeignKey(Territory)
    organisation_name = models.CharField(max_length=30)
    contact_title = models.CharField(choices=TITLE_CHOICES, max_length=4)
    contact_forename = models.CharField(max_length=30, blank=True)
    contact_lastname = models.CharField(max_length=30)
    ...

    def _get_current_evaluation(self):
        return Evaluation.objects.filter(trader=self).latest('open_date')

    current_evaluation = property(_get_current_evaluation)

Class Evaluation(models.Model):
    trader = models.ForeignKey(Trader)
    open_date = models.DateField("Open Date", null=True, blank=True)
    rated_date = models.DateField("Rated Date", null=True, blank=True)
    closed_date = models.DateField("Closed Date", null=True, blank=True)
    status = models.ForeignKey(RatingStatus, null=True, blank=True)
    ...
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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

http://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/ref/models/querysets/#latest
http://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/ref/models/querysets/#order-by

"I want to list all the traders along with their current evaluation status."

traders = Trader.objects.all()

{% for trader in traders %}
    {{ trader }} : {{ trader.evaluation_set.latest.status|default:"Not Evaluated" }}
{% endfor %}

"However, I want to be able to filter the results on the status of the latest evaluation (for example, all those current evaluations that are still open)."

"I thought an alternative to get around the problem would be to create a query based on Evaluation, and then lookup Traders instead. However, this means that those Traders who have not been evaluated yet, would never appear in results (unless I made sure that Traders always have at least one Evaluation record)."

If you were to filter by evaluation_status=open, you wouldn't get the traders that haven't been evaluated yet anyways.

so:

status = RatingStatus.get(status='open')
traders_with_open_evals = Traders.objects.filter(evaluation__status=status).distinct()

This isn't really necessary but for your reference:

I would have created a foreign key in the Trader model, that records that id of the most current Evaluation, however, that's not possible, because then the models will reference each other, and then you get into an circular ordering problem when creating the classes, ie Trader refers to Evaluation, but Evaluation hasn't been declared yet, or putting Evaluation first, yet Trader isn't declared.

http://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/ref/models/fields/#foreignkey

If you need to create a relationship on a model that has not yet been defined, you can use the name of the model, rather than the model object itself:

class Car(models.Model):
    manufacturer = models.ForeignKey('Manufacturer')
    # ...

class Manufacturer(models.Model):
    # ...

To refer to models defined in another application, you can explicitly specify a model with the full application label. For example, if the Manufacturer model above is defined in another application called production, you'd need to use:

class Car(models.Model):
    manufacturer = models.ForeignKey('production.Manufacturer')

This sort of reference can be useful when resolving circular import dependencies between two applications.

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Thanks. I added the current status to my trader model and it worked. Although I've just see you additions... –  alj Mar 30 '11 at 13:07

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