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I'm trying to make a mac app bundle. It is bundled around a shell file. The structure is like this:

App
    Contents
        Info.plist
            App.command
        MacOS
        Resources
            App.icns

However, when I double click on the app bundle, it shows the following prompt:

To open classroom.command, you need to install Rosetta. Would you like to install it now?

It seems that my app bundle is not intel-based. But it doesn't make sense. Shell scripts have nothing to do with what platform it is right?

I verified it by getting info on the .app root folder. I can see that the "Kind" is "Application". Whereas on other launchable apps, I see that the "Kind" is "Application (Intel)". Is there something I missed from Info.plist?

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1  
I am such a noob in unix. I forgot to tell what shell environment I am using. I added #!/bin/sh to the top of the file and now it worked. However, I am still quite curious. How is the line #!/bin/sh in the shell script related to thinking that this app is non-intel??? – hytparadisee Mar 30 '11 at 11:59
    
Thank you so much for adding that comment, it made me realise I had an extra space before #!/bin/bash. As you say, why the hell that makes OSX think the app is for PowerPC, I do not know. Also don't know how the hell I was supposed to be able to figure that out! Anyway, many many thanks, up voted your question. – Daniel Lucraft Mar 27 '12 at 12:16

Rosetta is a piece of software through which PowerPC code can be run on an Intel Mac. Sow depending on your proccessor,OS you might need to instal it to run the application.

here is the full explanation

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