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I would like to have a method which returns a class of a certain type, but I want the method to behave differently depending on whether or not the class extends a particular trait as follows:


case class ClassA extends TraitA
case class ClassB extends TraitB
case class ClassC extends TraitA
...
def myfunc[T]():T = {
  T match {
    case TraitA => // return new T in a particular way 
    case TraitB => // ditto
  }
}

Is this possible, or am I going about it the wrong way?

Thanks

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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can't compare types directly, because there isn't anything there to compare (at runtime, due to erasure). You could work on a representation of your class:

trait TraitA { }
trait TraitB { }
class ClassA extends TraitA { }
class ClassB extends TraitB { }

def myFunc[T](clazz: Class[T]) = {
  if (classOf[TraitA] isAssignableFrom clazz) println("A")
  else if (classOf[TraitB] isAssignableFrom clazz) println("B")
  else println("?")
}

scala> myFunc(classOf[ClassA])
A

scala> myFunc(classOf[String])
?

or you can pattern match on instances of the class:

def myFunc2[T](t: T) = t match {
  case _: TraitA => println("A")
  case _: TraitB => println("B")
  case _ => println("?")
}

scala> myFunc2(new ClassA)
A

scala> myFunc2(Some(5))
?

You can also use the first approach in a syntactically less obtrusive way via class manifests:

def myFunc3[T](implicit mf: ClassManifest[T]) = {
  val clazz = mf.erasure
  if (classOf[TraitA] isAssignableFrom clazz) println("A")
  else if (classOf[TraitB] isAssignableFrom clazz) println("B")
  else println("?")
}

scala> myFunc3[ClassA]
A

scala> myFunc3[String]
?

and you can choose different sorts of dispatch also if the if/else becomes wieldy:

object MyFunc {
  val dispatch = Map(
    classOf[TraitA] -> (() => println("A")),
    classOf[TraitB] -> (() => println("B"))
  )
  val default = () => println("?")
  def apply[T](implicit mf: ClassManifest[T]) = 
    dispatch.find(_._1 isAssignableFrom mf.erasure).map(_._2).getOrElse(default)()
}

scala> MyFunc[ClassA]
A

scala> MyFunc[String]
?

Note that any generic code that you use this from will need to have a class manifest available (either as an implicit parameter or in shorthand, [T: ClassManifest].

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I actually found 2 ways that work well in my case: 1) classOf[TraitA] isAssignableFrom clazz as you suggested 2) if(mf <:< implicitly[ClassManifest[TraitA]]) –  codefly Mar 30 '11 at 17:07
    
+1: at first I got annoyed with both your answer and Scala ("You can't compare types directly, because there isn't anything there to compare"... There is a type, and a type is certainly something. You should have written "there isn't any value" IMHO). But then you explained about class manifests, and that hit the spot. So thanks! –  rsenna May 23 '13 at 19:56
    
@rsenna - By "there isn't anything" I meant that there isn't anything there at runtime because T is just telling the compiler how it should keep your types straight at compile-time. So actually...a generic type is, at runtime, nothing. It's gone. ("Type erasure.") Manifests provide a way to supply that compile-time information at runtime. (ClassTag or TypeTag is the new way to do it in 2.10, though the old way still works.) Anyway, glad you found it useful even if my phrasing was not very tactful! –  Rex Kerr May 23 '13 at 22:40

You need an instance to check the type. A generic by itself is just a placeholder for a type. You could do something like this:

trait bTrait //common base trait
trait TraitA extends bTrait
trait TraitB extends bTrait

class ClassA extends TraitA
class ClassB extends TraitB

def myFunc[T <: bTrait](t:T) : String = //passing explicitly an instance of type T
{
  t match {
    case _ : TraitA => "TraitA"
    case _ : TraitB => "TraitB" 
  }
}

println(myFunc(new ClassA)) //prints TraitA
share|improve this answer
    
Agreed, if I had an instance this would be easy! –  codefly Mar 30 '11 at 17:06

"want the method to behave differently depending on whether or not the class extends a particular trait"

This is almost a canonical description of inheritance. Can't you have a method in each trait that encapsulates the differing behaviour you're after?

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The main issue here is that I don't have an instance of the object. Based on the object's type, I need to determine where to go and find it (in which database in this case) –  codefly Mar 30 '11 at 17:04

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