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I have the following code in an object pool that implements the IEnumerable interface.

public IEnumerable<T> ActiveNodes
{
    get
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < _pool.Count; i++)
        {
            if (_pool[i].AvailableInPool)
            {
                yield return _pool[i];
            }
        }
    }
}

As far as I know (according to this question), this will generate garbage as the IEnumerable object will need to be collected. None of the elements in _pool will ever be collected, as the purpose of the pool is to keep references to all of them to prevent garbage creation.

Can anyone suggest a way to allow iteration over _pool so that no garbage is generated?

When iterating over pool, all of the items in pool that have AvailableInPool == true should be iterated over. Order doesn't matter.

share|improve this question
3  
Waste is a fact of life. While we should not generate excesive waste, it's unreasonable to go out of our way to generate no waste at all (and yes, this applies to C# too) – SWeko Mar 30 '11 at 13:07
1  
I don't see any clear garbage problem in your code...did you find (using a profiler) that this piece of code is a problem ? – digEmAll Mar 30 '11 at 13:07
2  
@user492238 With the .NET compact CLR, keeping garbage "small" (i.e. shallow depth) is actually a negligible difference. I need to avoid garbage altogether. – Olhovsky Mar 30 '11 at 13:13
2  
@Skurmedel: Because I am using the .NET compact CLR, which uses a very different garbage collection approach from the more robust desktop version of the interpreter. – Olhovsky Mar 30 '11 at 13:13
2  
@Dan: Well it is more garbage than the integer used in the loop, as the integer will never cause a collection, and the IEnumerable will potentially cause a collection when nothing references it anymore. – Olhovsky Mar 31 '11 at 10:38
up vote 15 down vote accepted

Iterating items will in any 'normal' design always result in the creation of a new enumerable object. Creating and disposing objects is very fast, so only in very special scenarios (were low latency is the top most priority) garbage collections could (I say 'could') be a problem.

A design without garbage is possible by returning structures that don't implement IEnumerable. The C# compiler can still iterate such objects, because the foreach statement uses duck typing. But again, it is unlikely this is going to help you.

UPDATE

I believe there are better ways in increasing performance of your application, than resulting in this low level trickery, but it's your call. Here is a struct enumerable and struct enumerator. When you return the enumerable, the C# compiler can foreach over it:

public struct StructEnumerable<T>
{
    private readonly List<T> pool;

    public StructEnumerable(List<T> pool)
    {
        this.pool = pool;
    }

    public StructEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return new StructEnumerator<T>(this.pool);
    }
}

Here is the StructEnumerator:

public struct StructEnumerator<T>
{
    private readonly List<T> pool;
    private int index;

    public StructEnumerator(List<T> pool)
    {
        this.pool = pool;
        this.index = 0;
    }

    public T Current
    {
        get
        {
            if (this.pool == null || this.index == 0)
                throw new InvalidOperationException();

            return this.pool[this.index - 1];
        }
    }

    public bool MoveNext()
    {
        this.index++;
        return this.pool != null && this.pool.Count >= this.index;
    }

    public void Reset()
    {
        this.index = 0;
    }
}

You can simply return the StructEnumerable<T> as follows:

public StructEnumerable<T> Items
{
    get { return new StructEnumerable<T>(this.pool); }
}

And C# can iterate over this with a normal foreach:

foreach (var item in pool.Items)
{
    Console.WriteLine(item);
}

Note that you can't LINQ over the item. You need the IEnumerable interface for that, and that involves boxing and garbage collection.

Good luck.

share|improve this answer
2  
My scenario is special then, and avoiding garbage creation is critical to my application which runs on the .NET compact CLR which has a very different garbage collection approach from the desktop interpreter. – Olhovsky Mar 30 '11 at 13:11
    
@Olhovsky: then consider native code. – Seva Alekseyev Mar 30 '11 at 13:13
    
Calling ActiveNodes will result in the creation of a single object. That's not much for the garbage collector. Even for the Compact framework. – Steven Mar 30 '11 at 13:13
1  
@Seva: I am forced to use managed code. – Olhovsky Mar 30 '11 at 13:16
1  
@Steven: In my case it is 60 objects per second per pool, multiplied by many pools. The compact CLR collects after every 1MB of allocation. The latency caused by a collection is significant. – Olhovsky Mar 30 '11 at 13:17

Since XNA for XBox also works over the Compact Framework (and I suspect that's what you're working on given the hints you've given(1)), we can trust the XNA devs to teach us exactly when foreach creates garbage.

To quote the most relevant point (although the entire article's worth reading):

When doing a foreach over a Collection<T> an enumerator WILL be allocated.

When doing a foreach over most other collections, including as arrays, lists, queues, linked lists, and others:

  • if the collections are used explicitly, an enumerator will NOT be allocated.
  • if they are cast to interfaces, an enumerator WILL be allocated.

So, if _pool is a List, array or similar and can afford to, you can either return that type directly or cast the IEnumerable<T> to the respective type to avoid garbage during the foreach.

As some additional reading, Shawn Hargreaves can have some useful additional information.

(1) 60 calls per second, Compact Framework, can't go down to native code, 1MB of allocation before a GC is triggered.

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Also, you can have a pool of preallocated enumerators. Think about how many simultaneous enumerations you want to support.

The garbage collection overhead will go, at the expense of extra memory consumption. Speed vs. memory optimization dilemma in its purest form.

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First off, a number of people are pushing back on Olhovsky to suggest that this is worrying about nothing. Avoiding collection pressure is actually very important in some applications on some environments.

The compact framework garbage collector has an unsophisticated policy; it triggers a collection every time 1000KB of memory has been allocated. Now suppose you are writing a game that runs on the compact framework, and the physics engine generates 1KB of garbage every time it runs. Physics engines are typically run on the order of 20 times a second. So that's 1200KB of pressure per minute, and hey, that's already more than one collection per minute just from the physics engine. If the collection causes a noticable stutter in the game then that might be unacceptable. In such a scenario, anything you can do to decrease collection pressure helps.

I am learning this myself the hard way, even though I work on the desktop CLR. We have scenarios in the compiler where we must avoid collection pressure, and we are jumping through all kinds of object pooling hoops to do so. Olhovsky, I feel your pain.

So, to come to your question, how can you iterate over the collection of pooled objects without creating collection pressure?

First, let's think about why collection pressure happens in the typical scenario. Suppose you have

 foreach(var node in ActiveNodes) { ... }

Logically this allocates two objects. First, it allocates the enumerable -- the sequence -- that represents the sequence of nodes. Second, it allocates the enumerator -- the cursor -- that represents the current position in the sequence.

In practice sometimes you can cheat a bit and have one object that represents both the sequence and the enumerator, but you still have one object allocated.

How can we avoid this collection pressure? Three things come to mind.

1) Don't make an ActiveNodes method in the first place. Make the caller iterate over the pool by index, and check themselves whether the node is available. The sequence is then the pool, which is already allocated, and the cursor is an integer, neither of which are creating new collection pressure. The price you pay is duplicated code.

2) As Steven suggests, the compiler will take any types that have the right public methods and properties; they don't have to be IEnumerable and IEnumerator. You can make your own mutable-struct sequence and cursor objects, pass those around by value, and avoid collection pressure. It is dangerous to have mutable structs, but it is possible. Note that List<T> uses this strategy for its enumerator; study its implementation for ideas.

3) Allocate the sequence and the enumerators on the heap normally and pool them too! You're already going with a pooling strategy, so there's no reason why you can't pool an enumerator as well. Enumerators even have a convenient "Reset" method that usually just throws an exception, but you could write a custom enumerator object that used it to reset the enumerator back to the beginning of the sequence when it goes back in the pool.

Most objects are only enumerated once at a time, so the pool can be small in typical cases.

(Now, of course you may have a chicken-and-egg problem here; how are you going to enumerate the pool of enumerators?)

share|improve this answer
2  
'If the collection causes a noticable stutter in the game' than the game will stutter anyway sometimes, right? So if we cannot avoid ANY collection, the CLR will simply not be suitable for implementing the game? – user492238 Mar 30 '11 at 15:22
3  
@user492238: Game implementers have a variety of techniques to minimize, mitigate or eliminate pauses caused by garbage collection in games. Whether those techniques are sufficient for a game designer to make a playable and profitable game on some version of the CLR is not a subject that one can easily cover in five hundred characters of comment. The fact that plenty of people do make games for various versions of the CLR is evidence that it is suitable for lots of games. – Eric Lippert Mar 30 '11 at 15:33
    
Thanks. Didn't mean to argue against any of those techniques. I am pooling sucessfully myself a lot. But, for an app, which is 100% garbage free, I consider the GC to be a kind of too expensive 'fallback memory manager' (technically spoken). Never mind ;) – user492238 Mar 30 '11 at 15:44
    
Thanks Eric, this answer was helpful :) – Olhovsky Mar 30 '11 at 18:57
    
@EricLippert hey, in critical situations I am usually using '.ToArray() ' whenever an array changes (or once per iteration max) and then iterate over an array with 'for' instead of 'foreach' what do you think of it? – cubrman Aug 24 '15 at 9:43

Does it have to be IEnumerable? Will refactoring to an array with good old indexed acecss help?

share|improve this answer
    
It does not have to be IEnumerable. I just want to iterate. I guess I can write an indexer. My hope for this question was that I might hear some different options so that I might decide better what to use. Instead the discussion has degenerated into me having to explain to everyone why I'm avoiding garbage. – Olhovsky Mar 30 '11 at 14:12
1  
The enumerator is just a way to abstract the notion of the current position in the sequence. If the sequence allows for O(1) random access, an integer variable will do just as well. – Seva Alekseyev Mar 30 '11 at 14:14
    
Well technically, indexing will be a little slower potentially (I think), as I would have to create a new index each time before performing iteration to find the next index. – Olhovsky Mar 30 '11 at 14:31
    
The "index" is an integer variable on the stack. Its creation takes zero time, since the stack frame allocation code is alredy there. – Seva Alekseyev Mar 30 '11 at 15:16
    
Seva: Finding which element to return given an index requires doing a loop over the array until it finds the next node with the AvailableInPool property set to true. So a new variable will be allocated in order to count over the loop at each access. This is why using an indexer will be slightly slower (unless the compiler does some magic here, but with the compact framework, that is very unlikely, and not likely with the robust framework too). – Olhovsky Mar 30 '11 at 18:46

You could implement your own IEnumerator class which will enumerate over these active nodes.

Now if you can guarantee that only one client will be enumerating over the active nodes at any one time, your class can cache this class so only a single instance exists. Then no garbage will need collecting. The call to ActiveNodes will call reset to start enumerating from the start.

This is a dangerous assumption to make, but if you are optimising you may be able to consider it

If you have multiple clients enumerating over these nodes at any time, then each will need its own instance of IEnumerator to be able to store their current cursor position in the collection. In which case these will need to be created and collected with each call - and you may as well stick with your original design.

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Actually you don't need 2 clients to break the asssumption: 2 nested foreach's on the same IEnumerable are enough... – digEmAll Mar 30 '11 at 13:52

Dont be afraid of those tiny garbage objects. The ActiveNodes in the pool will (should) be much more costly. Therefore, if you get rid of recreating them it should be sufficient.

@Edit: if you are made to use a managed platform and really want to archieve a zero-garbage state, disclaim the usage of the pool in a foreach loop and iterate over it in another manner, possibly utilizing an indexer. Or consider creating a list of potential nodes and return that instead.

@Edit2: Of course, implementing IEnumerator und using Current(), Next() and so on, would work as well.

share|improve this answer
    
As I said in the question, the point of the "pool" is to prevent the elements in the _pool from ever being disposed, so there is no garbage collection cost for those. The "tiny garbage objects" are small, but many. This iterator gets called many times per second by multiple instances of this class. I know that using an iterator is "possibly" a solution. The entire point of the question is HOW can it be a solution? – Olhovsky Mar 30 '11 at 13:25
    
@Olhovsky 'many' objects do not harm the GC. The way it works, it considers all object as garbage and collects live objects only. HOW the solution may look like? Possibly by implementing a GetNode() function which returns the next available node (if any). Call that function repeatedly - without foreach. – user492238 Mar 30 '11 at 13:31
    
@user492238: On the .NET compact CLR, garbage collections are done once per 1MB of garbage created. So how often the GC collects is purely a function of how many objects per unit time are created by this method, assuming that all garbage objects created by the method are the same size. – Olhovsky Mar 30 '11 at 13:33

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