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Is it possible to specify a method block parameter in Objective-C without using a typedef? It must be, like function pointers, but I can't hit on the winning syntax without using an intermediate typedef:

typedef BOOL (^PredicateBlock_t)(int);
- (void) myMethodTakingPredicate:(PredicateBlock_t)predicate

only the above compiles, all these fail:

-  (void) myMethodTakingPredicate:( BOOL(^block)(int) ) predicate
-  (void) myMethodTakingPredicate:BOOL (^predicate)(int)

and I can't remember what other combinations I've tried.

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goshdarnblocksyntax.com –  Kyle Clegg Jun 30 at 18:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 174 down vote accepted
- ( void )myMethodTakingPredicate: ( BOOL ( ^ )( int ) )predicate
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9  
+1, though a typedef should really be preferred for more complicated cases. –  larsmans Mar 30 '11 at 13:35
    
thanks, that was driving me nuts –  Bogatyr Mar 30 '11 at 14:07
2  
- ( void )myMethodTakingPredicate: ( BOOL ( ^ )( NSString *name, NSString *age ) )predicate { //How Should I Access name & age here...? } –  Mohammad Abdurraafay Sep 12 '11 at 8:01
5  
Those are just parameter names. Just use them. –  Macmade Sep 12 '11 at 8:48
1  
@larsmans I agree, unless this particular predicate/block is used in a lot of places where it would be more clear to have it typedef'd. Apple has defined a number of blocks that were quite simple, but did so such that it was easy to find what they wanted in documentation. –  mtmurdock Feb 29 '12 at 3:23

This is how it goes, for example...

[self smartBlocks:@"Pen" youSmart:^(NSString *response) {
        NSLog(@"Response:%@", response);
    }];


- (void)smartBlocks:(NSString *)yo youSmart:(void (^) (NSString *response))handler {
    if ([yo compare:@"Pen"] == NSOrderedSame) {
        handler(@"Ink");
    }
    if ([yo compare:@"Pencil"] == NSOrderedSame) {
        handler(@"led");
    }
}
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Is there a reason you don't use the [NSString isEqualToString:] method? –  orkoden Mar 22 '13 at 13:53
1  
Nothing specific. I'm just use to use 'compare:' a lot. '[NSString isEqualToString:]' is a better way though. –  Mohammad Abdurraafay Mar 25 '13 at 5:28
    
Good and Easy explanation ...... +1 –  The Tiger May 22 '13 at 7:57

Another example (this issue benefits from multiple):

@implementation CallbackAsyncClass {
void (^_loginCallback) (NSDictionary *response);
}
// …


- (void)loginWithCallback:(void (^) (NSDictionary *response))handler {
    // Do something async / call URL
    _loginCallback = Block_copy(handler);
    // response will come to the following method (how is left to the reader) …
}

- (void)parseLoginResponse {
    // Receive and parse response, then make callback

   _loginCallback(response);
   Block_release(_loginCallback);
   _loginCallback = nil;
}


// this is how we make the call:
[instanceOfCallbackAsyncClass loginWithCallback:^(NSDictionary *response) {
   // respond to result
}];
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Nice addition for managing the block memory. +1 –  Ryan Poolos Feb 21 '13 at 14:35

protected by Macmade Oct 6 '12 at 22:44

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