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I have a series of number as such: [1 2 4 8 16 32 64 128], if I input a number, i.e. 66, then the output should be 64 and 2. If I input 87, then the output should be 64, 16, 4, 2, 1.

(Basically, it first divide by the largest possible number, find the remainder, then keep dividing by the largest number possible, until the remainder is 0. Or another way maybe just to subtract the largest possible number and keep subtracting like that until it reaches 0.)

I'm thinking of a recursive function, but not really sure. Any help?

Thanks.

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7  
have you considered adding the homework tag? :) –  Marek Mar 30 '11 at 14:54
5  
Think binary. –  Dykam Mar 30 '11 at 14:54
2  
If this is homework, be open about it. This can be solved either iteratively or recursively, and you'll have to decide which (you give us no reason why you're thinking recursive). Try writing your program. If you run into problems, come back here and post your code and exactly what went wrong. That gives us the best opportunity to help you. –  David Thornley Mar 30 '11 at 14:55
1  
as for that series of numbers - is it always the powers of 2 (in which case you dont even need to store it) or do you want it to work for any arbitrary series? –  jon_darkstar Mar 30 '11 at 15:09
    
:) This is not an homework task at all... it's client related though, I'm working on an apps to highlight the error columns based on the number returned from the database, and that "error bits number" is based on that number series. Thanks. –  Saxman Mar 30 '11 at 16:38

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's the iterative version

public static IEnumerable<int> FindIndex(int input)
{
    var power = 0;
    while (input > 0)
    {
        var digit = input % 2;
        if (digit == 1)
        {
            yield return (int)Math.Pow(2, power);
        }
        input /= 2;
        power++;
    }
}

and here's the recursive version

public static void FindIndexRec(int input, int power, ICollection<int> numbers)
{
    if (input == 0)
    {
        return;
    }
    var digit = input % 2;
    if (digit == 1)
    {
        numbers.Add((int)Math.Pow(2, power));
    }
    FindIndexRec(input / 2, ++power, numbers);
}

and you can call it like

var numbers = new List<int>();
FindIndexRec(input, 0, numbers);
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class Program
{
    [Flags]
    enum Bits
    {
        _1 = 1,
        _2 = 2,
        _4 = 4,
        _8 = 8,
        _16 = 16,
        _32 = 32,
        _64 = 64,
        _128 = 128
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var b = (Bits)87;
        Console.WriteLine(b);
        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 nice idea to use an enum (but the title mentions recusion) –  MaLio Mar 30 '11 at 15:18
    
very nice, i hadnt thought of this. i dont know C# super well, can you macro that enum somehow? then it would be really sweet solution –  jon_darkstar Mar 30 '11 at 15:20
1  
+1 Learned something today. Thanks! –  Austin Salonen Mar 30 '11 at 15:21
    
+1, do you need the flags attribute on the enum for this to work? –  Joe Mar 30 '11 at 15:24
    
@Joe: yes, you need the attribute so that it takes it "bitwise" :) –  František Žiačik Mar 30 '11 at 15:27

You could use bit masks. In fact, scratch that - you should use bit masks! That is almost certainly how the error code was created, and it's how it should be picked apart. Anything else is highly likely to confuse your audience of other programmers.

I make no claims to represent all programmers, nor do I claim to be any good, but I am a programmer, and all the other answers confused me. It's obviously a bitwise "problem", so why obfuscate?

There's no need to even store the result anywhere, since it's as quick to recompute it every time, like so:

for(int i=0;i<8;++i) {
    if((error&(1<<i))!=0 {
        // 1<<i is in the resulting list.
    }
}
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List<int> additives = new List<int>()
List<int> sourceNumbers = new List<int> { 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128 };

int sourceNumber = 87;

foreach(var number in sourceNumbers.Reverse())
{
    if(sourceNumber % number > 0)
    {
       additives.Add(number);
       sourceNumber -= number;
    }
    else
    {
       additives.Add(number);
       break;
    }
}
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Here's a pretty naive iterated solution in pseudocode. Try to take it somewhere more interesting from here. You can do it recursively, you can convert the integer to binary representation and iterate on that string, id imagine theres a clever way to do it with LINQ very concisely, etc.

v = inputNumber
while(v > 0):
     temp = greatest power of 2 less than v
     print temp
     v -= temp

PS - this does not explictly store the series in question - it presumes powers of 2.

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    string calculate(int input)
    {
        string output = string.Empty;
        int[] series = new int[] { 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128 };
        foreach (int i in series.Reverse<int>())
        {
            if (input >= i)
            {
                output += i.ToString() + " ";
                input -= i;
            }
        }
        return output;
    }
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This one will work with input numbers greater than 256:

   int[] calculate(int input)
    {
        List<int> retVal = new List<int>();
        string output = string.Empty;
        int[] series = new int[] { 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128 };
        foreach (int i in series.Reverse<int>())
        {
            while (input >= i)
            {
                retVal.Add(i);
                input -= i;
            }
        }

        return retVal.ToArray();
    }

Ex: var result = calculate(284); // result = 128, 128, 16, 8, 4

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