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Problem: Corrupt TCP segment.

I send a sequence of ByteBuffers over and over in a SocketChannel. The sequence is the following:

\r\n
length of chunk (example: fff)
\r\n
chunk data (rubbish, a 1000 - 5000 character long string)
\r\n
length of next chunk (example: fff)
\r\n
next chunk data (rubbish, a 1000 - 5000 character long string)

...

I hope you see the pattern. The MTU on network level is about 1500, so it'll create TCP segments to send over the "chunk data".

The problem in the segments is: Somehow(?), randomly(?), a segment (its payload) starts with \r\n instead of the remaining bytes from the "chunk data" first.

So you get for example:

(segment 1)
\r\n
length of chunk (example: fff)
\r\n
chunk data (456 bytes)

(segment 2)
\r\n
chunk data (remaining 156 bytes)
length of next
\r\n

Instead of:

(segment 1)
\r\n
length of chunk (example: fff)
\r\n
chunk data (456 bytes)

(segment 2)
chunk data (remaining 156 bytes)
\r\n
length of next
\r\n

I'd like to know if Java code is even able to cause that, knowing that my "chunk data" ByteBuffer sent correctly, except for the ByteBuffer containing \r\n that joins in... Any help is welcome, thank you for your time!

Andrew

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3  
Show us some code. It is unlikely that the problem is at the Java library, OS or network level. –  NPE Mar 30 '11 at 15:23
    
Thank you for your reply, but I'm currently just looking for "known issues" as the SocketChannel comes through about 20 classes before arriving at the point of using write(ByteBuffer[]) :-( –  AndrewBourgeois Mar 30 '11 at 15:39
    
How is the data arranged by ByteBuffer. I would have thought each ByteBuffer contained a complete message with its header so there is no way the data's order could be changed. –  Peter Lawrey Mar 30 '11 at 15:46
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I will bet that you are ignoring the result of a read or write. TCP does not lose or corrupt data and neither do the Socket APIs or the Java networking libraries. At least I've never seen it in about 22 years of network programming and 14 years of Java.

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+1 - The bug is 99.9999% likely to be in the OP's code ... not in the network stacks / Java class libraries. –  Stephen C Mar 31 '11 at 0:50
    
You are correct, the transfer from ByteBuffer[] to the SocketChannel was done in a for loop, and only after(!) the for loop, the remaining bytes were written to the SocketChannel. That means if the ByteBuffer with index 3 didn't return "emptied", the next ByteBuffer might've been written anyway before we write the remaining bytes. P.S.: The bug is located in the AdaptIt library, available on SourceForge. Thank you for the help! –  AndrewBourgeois Apr 1 '11 at 13:56
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It is not because of network issue but with the way we coded. If we are reading and writing the data in chunks it may lead to data corruption because of last chunk. It may be possible the last data chunk read is partially filled and having default values as 0 for byte array. Following example shows the solution for it

ObjectOutputStream out = new ObjectOutputStream(
                socket.getOutputStream());
ObjectInputStream in = new ObjectInputStream(socket.getInputStream());
ObjectOutputStream out = new ObjectOutputStream(socket.getOutputStream());
//Something local returns DataInputStream from server
InputStream dataInputStream = local.downloadFile(fileToBeRead);
int chunkSize = 10000;
byte[] chunkByteArray = new byte[chunkSize];
int bytesRead = -1;
while ((bytesRead = dataInputStream.read(chunkByteArray)) != -1) {
    if (bytesRead < chunkSize) {
        System.out.println("Last Chunk is " + bytesRead);
        chunkByteArray = getLastChunkByteArray(bytesRead,chunkByteArray);
    }
    out.write(chunkByteArray);
}
            dataInputStream.close();

And the method

private byte[] getLastChunkByteArray(int noOfBytesRead,
        byte[] partialFilledChunk) {

    byte[] lastChunk = new byte[noOfBytesRead];
    for (int i = 0; i < noOfBytesRead; i++) {
        lastChunk[i] = partialFilledChunk[i];
    }
    return lastChunk;
}

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