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Given a simple batch file, c1.bat, containing:

start notepad 1> nul 2> nul
exit

and a Java program:

import java.io.InputStream;

public class ProcessTest {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        ProcessBuilder b = new ProcessBuilder();
        b.command("c1.bat");
        Process p = b.start();
        new Thread(new ProcDrain(p)).start();
        System.out.println("Parent process finished: " + p.waitFor());
    }

    private static class ProcDrain implements Runnable {
        private final Process p;

        private ProcDrain (Process p) {
            this.p = p;
        }

        @Override
        public void run() {
            try {
                InputStream in = p.getInputStream();
                while (in.read() >= 0) { }
                System.out.println("Inputstream drainer finished");
            } catch (Exception e) {
                throw new RuntimeException(e);
            }
        }
    }
}

The first process, which executes c1.bat, ends promptly having spawned another process (notepad). The drainer thread however is blocked in the read() call, and does not terminate until notepad is closed. This suggests that notepad is holding open the stdout file descriptor of the original process, despite the batch file having redirected it.

Is there some way for the batch file to close the stdout/stderr file descriptors such that the drainer thread will not block on read() once the spawned process has actually exited?

share|improve this question
    
If the descriptors are redirected to nul, why do you also have to drain them? –  Jim Garrison Mar 30 '11 at 15:57
    
This is a bit of a simplification of a larger problem. I'm interested in the answer for two reasons: What is going on behind the scenes here and why is the behaviour different to say, a unix-like system? and it's still a problem if the batch file contains a few other short-lived commands that you wanted to read the output from, but ignore the output from the long-lived sub-process (notepad in this case). –  Mike Mar 30 '11 at 16:07
    
This question appears to be directly related to another post‌​. I posted an answer, link that may help folks on how to workaround the problem. Not too keen on what I have done so far, but seems to be working for my use cases. –  ewh Aug 15 '12 at 8:42

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