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Here is a basic proof-of-concept script:

<?php
for($i = 1; $i < 13; $i++)
{
    echo 'Using ' . $i . ' | ';
    echo date('F', mktime(0,0,0,$i)) . " | ";
    echo date('F', strtotime('2011-' . $i . '-01')) . "<br />";
}

And the output I get is:

Using 1 | January | January
Using 2 | March | February
Using 3 | March | March
Using 4 | April | April
Using 5 | May | May
Using 6 | June | June
Using 7 | July | July
Using 8 | August | August
Using 9 | September | September
Using 10 | October | October
Using 11 | November | November
Using 12 | December | December

What happened to February??

This is killing me as it just stopped showing February and started showing March.

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up vote 10 down vote accepted

You are using mktime() incorrectly.

int mktime ([ int $hour = date("H") 
            [, int $minute = date("i") 
            [, int $second = date("s") 
            [, int $month = date("n") 
            [, int $day = date("j")  <------------ here 
            [, int $year = date("Y") <------------ and here
            [, int $is_dst = -1 ]]]]]]] )

If you don't specify $day and $year, they will default to today's date.

Today is the 30th, which doesn't exist in February.

This will work:

echo date('F', mktime(0,0,0,$i,1,2011)) . " | "; 
share|improve this answer
    
Stupid, stupid, stupid. Thanks. – Josh K Mar 30 '11 at 16:20

Quite simple - you're running this on the 29th, 30th, or 31st of the month. mktime(0,0,0,2) is really mktime(0,0,0,2,date('j'),date('Y')), which in the case of today would try to create February 30th 2011, which is March 2nd.

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From the manual:

Arguments may be left out in order from right to left; any arguments thus omitted will be set to the current value according to the local date and time.

Thus, it sets the fifth argument to the current day (30 here). Which means it adds to the date, since 30 is an invalid day in February, and makes it march.

share|improve this answer
    
Feb 30th = Mar 2nd, basically (unless it's a leap year, in which case it's Mar 1st). – Marc B Mar 30 '11 at 16:19
    
@Marc: correct. – Decent Dabbler Mar 30 '11 at 16:20

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