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So I currently use something like:

$(window).resize(function(){resizedw();});

But this gets called many times while resizing process goes on. Is it possible to catch an event when it ends?

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Maybe attach using .one() so it only executes after all resizing is done and not over and over? –  Brad Christie Mar 30 '11 at 17:44
3  
When a user resizes a window manually (by dragging it) the resize event will be called more than once, so using .one() really won't be effective. –  jessegavin Mar 30 '11 at 17:47

13 Answers 13

up vote 53 down vote accepted

I had luck with the following recommendation: http://forum.jquery.com/topic/the-resizeend-event

Here's the code so you don't have to dig through his post's link & source:

var rtime = new Date(1, 1, 2000, 12,00,00);
var timeout = false;
var delta = 200;
$(window).resize(function() {
    rtime = new Date();
    if (timeout === false) {
        timeout = true;
        setTimeout(resizeend, delta);
    }
});

function resizeend() {
    if (new Date() - rtime < delta) {
        setTimeout(resizeend, delta);
    } else {
        timeout = false;
        alert('Done resizing');
    }               
}

Thanks sime.vidas for the code!

share|improve this answer

You can use setTimeout() and clearTimeout()

function resizedw(){
    // Haven't resized in 100ms!
}

var doit;
window.onresize = function(){
  clearTimeout(doit);
  doit = setTimeout(resizedw, 100);
};

Code example on jsfiddle.

share|improve this answer
3  
This is a great answer. It does what the plugin I recommended does, only without a plugin. –  jessegavin Mar 30 '11 at 17:48
    
+1 for writing up the example faster than I did :) –  Demian Brecht Mar 30 '11 at 17:51
    
I think the only way to really improve this is to detect mouse movement. I suspect digging into it would not payoff, though. –  Michael Haren Mar 30 '11 at 18:19
    
Does this only work if the resize is finished within a second? My function was triggering when I tried using this (I was slow w/ my window resize though) –  Dolan Antenucci May 8 '11 at 6:54
11  
This is the best javascript answer on the entire internet –  notbad.jpeg Jul 31 '13 at 8:35

Internet Exploerer provides an resizeEnd event. Other browsers will trigger the resize event many times while you're resizing.

There are other great answers here that show how to use setTimeout and the .throttle, .debounce methods from lodash and underscore, so I will mention Ben Alman's throttle-debounce jQuery plugin which accomplishes what you're after.

Suppose you have this function that you want to trigger after a resize:

function onResize() {
  console.log("Resize just happened!");
};

Throttle Example
In the following example, onResize() will only be called once every 250 milliseconds during a window resize.

$(window).resize( $.throttle( 250, onResize) );

Debounce Example
In the following example, onResize() will only be called once at the end of a window resizing action. This achieves the same result that @Mark presents in his answer.

$(window).resize( $.debounce( 250, onResize) );
share|improve this answer

There is an elegant solution using the Underscore.js So, if you are using it in your project you can do the following -

$( window ).resize( _.debounce( resizedw, 500 ) );

This should be enough :) But, If you are interested to read more on that, you can check my blog post - http://rifatnabi.com/post/detect-end-of-jquery-resize-event-using-underscore-debounce

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You can store a reference id to any setInterval or setTimeout. Like this:

var loop = setInterval(func, 30);

// some time later clear the interval
clearInterval(loop);

To do this without a "global" variable you can add a local variable to the function itself. Ex:

$(window).resize(function() {
    clearTimeout(this.id);
    this.id = setTimeout(doneResizing, 500);
});

function doneResizing(){
  $("body").append("<br/>done!");   
}
share|improve this answer

You can use setTimeout() and clearTimeout() in conjunction with jQuery.data:

$(window).resize(function() {
    clearTimeout($.data(this, 'resizeTimer'));
    $.data(this, 'resizeTimer', setTimeout(function() {
        //do something
        alert("Haven't resized in 200ms!");
    }, 200));
});

Update

I wrote an extension to enhance jQuery's default on (& bind)-event-handler. It attaches an event handler function for one or more events to the selected elements if the event was not triggered for a given interval. This is useful if you want to fire a callback only after a delay, like the resize event, or else. https://github.com/yckart/jquery.unevent.js

;(function ($) {
    var methods = { on: $.fn.on, bind: $.fn.bind };
    $.each(methods, function(k){
        $.fn[k] = function () {
            var args = [].slice.call(arguments),
                delay = args.pop(),
                fn = args.pop(),
                timer;

            args.push(function () {
                var self = this,
                    arg = arguments;
                clearTimeout(timer);
                timer = setTimeout(function(){
                    fn.apply(self, [].slice.call(arg));
                }, delay);
            });

            return methods[k].apply(this, isNaN(delay) ? arguments : args);
        };
    });
}(jQuery));

Use it like any other on or bind-event handler, except that you can pass an extra parameter as a last:

$(window).on('resize', function(e) {
    console.log(e.type + '-event was 200ms not triggered');
}, 200);

http://jsfiddle.net/ARTsinn/EqqHx/

share|improve this answer

i wrote a litte wrapper function on my own...

onResize  =   function(fn) {
    if(!fn || typeof fn != 'function')
        return 0;

    var args    = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 1);

    onResize.fnArr    = onResize.fnArr || [];
    onResize.fnArr.push([fn, args]);

    onResize.loop   = function() {
        $.each(onResize.fnArr, function(index, fnWithArgs) {
            fnWithArgs[0].apply(undefined, fnWithArgs[1]);
        });
    };

    $(window).on('resize', function(e) {
        window.clearTimeout(onResize.timeout);
        onResize.timeout    = window.setTimeout("onResize.loop();", 300);
    });
};

Here is the usage:

var testFn  = function(arg1, arg2) {
    console.log('[testFn] arg1: '+arg1);
    console.log('[testFn] arg2: '+arg2);
};

// document ready
$(function() {
    onResize(testFn, 'argument1', 'argument2');
});
share|improve this answer
(function(){
    var special = jQuery.event.special,
        uid1 = 'D' + (+new Date()),
        uid2 = 'D' + (+new Date() + 1);

    special.resizestart = {
        setup: function() {
            var timer,
                handler =  function(evt) {
                    var _self = this,
                        _args = arguments;
                    if (timer) {
                        clearTimeout(timer);
                    } else {
                        evt.type = 'resizestart';
                        jQuery.event.handle.apply(_self, _args);
                    }

                    timer = setTimeout( function(){
                        timer = null;
                    }, special.resizestop.latency);
                };
            jQuery(this).bind('resize', handler).data(uid1, handler);
        },
        teardown: function(){
            jQuery(this).unbind( 'resize', jQuery(this).data(uid1) );
        }
    };

    special.resizestop = {
        latency: 200,
        setup: function() {
            var timer,
                handler = function(evt) {
                    var _self = this,
                        _args = arguments;
                    if (timer) {
                        clearTimeout(timer);
                    }
                    timer = setTimeout( function(){
                        timer = null;
                        evt.type = 'resizestop';
                        jQuery.event.handle.apply(_self, _args);
                    }, special.resizestop.latency);
                };

            jQuery(this).bind('resize', handler).data(uid2, handler);
        },
        teardown: function() {
            jQuery(this).unbind( 'resize', jQuery(this).data(uid2) );
        }
    };
})();

$(window).bind('resizestop',function(){
    //...
});
share|improve this answer

This is a modification to Dolan's code above, I've added a feature which checks the window size at the start of the resize and compares it to the size at the end of the resize, if size is either bigger or smaller than the margin (eg. 1000) then it reloads.

var rtime = new Date(1, 1, 2000, 12,00,00);
var timeout = false;
var delta = 200;
var windowsize = $window.width();
var windowsizeInitial = $window.width();

$(window).on('resize',function() {
    windowsize = $window.width();
    rtime = new Date();
    if (timeout === false) {
            timeout = true;
            setTimeout(resizeend, delta);
        }
});

function resizeend() {
if (new Date() - rtime < delta) {
    setTimeout(resizeend, delta);
    return false;
} else {
        if (windowsizeInitial > 1000 && windowsize > 1000 ) {
            setTimeout(resizeend, delta);
            return false;
        }
        if (windowsizeInitial < 1001 && windowsize < 1001 ) {
            setTimeout(resizeend, delta);
            return false;
        } else {
            timeout = false;
            location.reload();
        }
    }
    windowsizeInitial = $window.width();
    return false;
}
share|improve this answer

Well, as far as the window manager is concerned, each resize event is its own message, with a distinct beginning and end, so technically, every time the window is resized, it is the end.

Having said that, maybe you want to set a delay to your continuation? Here's an example.

var t = -1;
function doResize()
{
    document.write('resize');
}
$(document).ready(function(){
    $(window).resize(function(){
        clearTimeout(t);
        t = setTimeout(doResize, 1000);
    });
});
share|improve this answer

I wrote this simple function for handling delay in execution, useful inside jQuery .scroll() and .resize() So callback_f will run only once for specific id string.

function delay_exec( id, wait_time, callback_f ){

    // IF WAIT TIME IS NOT ENTERED IN FUNCTION CALL,
    // SET IT TO DEFAULT VALUE: 0.5 SECOND
    if( typeof wait_time === "undefined" )
        wait_time = 500;

    // CREATE GLOBAL ARRAY(IF ITS NOT ALREADY CREATED)
    // WHERE WE STORE CURRENTLY RUNNING setTimeout() FUNCTION FOR THIS ID
    if( typeof window['delay_exec'] === "undefined" )
        window['delay_exec'] = [];

    // RESET CURRENTLY RUNNING setTimeout() FUNCTION FOR THIS ID,
    // SO IN THAT WAY WE ARE SURE THAT callback_f WILL RUN ONLY ONE TIME
    // ( ON LATEST CALL ON delay_exec FUNCTION WITH SAME ID  )
    if( typeof window['delay_exec'][id] !== "undefined" )
        clearTimeout( window['delay_exec'][id] );

    // SET NEW TIMEOUT AND EXECUTE callback_f WHEN wait_time EXPIRES,
    // BUT ONLY IF THERE ISNT ANY MORE FUTURE CALLS ( IN wait_time PERIOD )
    // TO delay_exec FUNCTION WITH SAME ID AS CURRENT ONE
    window['delay_exec'][id] = setTimeout( callback_f , wait_time );
}


// USAGE

jQuery(window).resize(function() {

    delay_exec('test1', 1000, function(){
        console.log('1st call to delay "test1" successfully executed!');
    });

    delay_exec('test1', 1000, function(){
        console.log('2nd call to delay "test1" successfully executed!');
    });

    delay_exec('test1', 1000, function(){
        console.log('3rd call to delay "test1" successfully executed!');
    });

    delay_exec('test2', 1000, function(){
        console.log('1st call to delay "test2" successfully executed!');
    });

    delay_exec('test3', 1000, function(){
        console.log('1st call to delay "test3" successfully executed!');
    });

});

/* RESULT
3rd call to delay "test1" successfully executed!
1st call to delay "test2" successfully executed!
1st call to delay "test3" successfully executed!
*/
share|improve this answer
    
Could you clarify usage here? Are you suggesting one does: $(window).resize(function() { delay_exec('test1', 30, function() { ... delayed stuff here ... }); });? Pretty clean code otherwise. Thanks for sharing. :) –  mhulse Jun 22 at 16:31
1  
Yes, exactly, I updated my example. Thanks. –  Déján Kőŕdić Jun 22 at 18:24
    
You rock! Thanks @Déján! +1 all the way. Cool code example, it works very well from what I have tested. Simple to use, too. Thanks again for sharing. :) –  mhulse Jun 22 at 22:23

since the selected answer didn't actually work .. and if you're not using jquery here is a simple throttle function with an example of how to use it with window resizing

    function throttle(end,delta) {

    var base = this;

    base.wait = false;
    base.delta = 200;
    base.end = end;

    base.trigger = function(context) {

        //only allow if we aren't waiting for another event
        if ( !base.wait ) {

            //signal we already have a resize event
            base.wait = true;

            //if we are trying to resize and we 
            setTimeout(function() {

                //call the end function
                if(base.end) base.end.call(context);

                //reset the resize trigger
                base.wait = false;
            }, base.delta);
        }
    }
};

var windowResize = new throttle(function() {console.log('throttle resize');},200);

window.onresize = function(event) {
    windowResize.trigger();
}
share|improve this answer

this worked for me as I did not want to use any plugins.

$(window).resize(function() {
    var originalWindowSize = 0;
    var currentWidth = 0;

    var setFn = function () {
        originalWindowSize = $(window).width();
    };

    var checkFn = function () {
        setTimeout(function () {
            currentWidth = $(window).width();
            if (currentWidth === originalWindowSize) {
                console.info("same? = yes") 
                // execute code 
            } else {
                console.info("same? = no"); 
                // do nothing 
            }
        }, 500)
    };
    setFn();
    checkFn();
});

On window re-size invoke "setFn" which gets width of window and save as "originalWindowSize". Then invoke "checkFn" which after 500ms (or your preference) gets the current window size, and compares the original to the current, if they are not the same, then the window is still being re-sized. Don't forget to remove console messages in production, and (optional) can make "setFn" self executing.

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