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I have a list of people's ID and their first name, and a list of people's ID and their surname. Some people don't have a first name and some don't have a surname; I'd like to do a full outer join on the two lists.

So the following lists:

ID  FirstName
--  ---------
 1  John
 2  Sue

ID  LastName
--  --------
 1  Doe
 3  Smith

Should produce:

ID  FirstName  LastName
--  ---------  --------
 1  John       Doe
 2  Sue
 3             Smith

I'm new to LINQ (so forgive me if I'm being lame) and have found quite a few solutions for 'LINQ Outer Joins' which all look quite similar, but really seem to be left outer joins.

My attempts so far go something like this:

private void OuterJoinTest()
{
    List<FirstName> firstNames = new List<FirstName>();
    firstNames.Add(new FirstName { ID = 1, Name = "John" });
    firstNames.Add(new FirstName { ID = 2, Name = "Sue" });

    List<LastName> lastNames = new List<LastName>();
    lastNames.Add(new LastName { ID = 1, Name = "Doe" });
    lastNames.Add(new LastName { ID = 3, Name = "Smith" });

    var outerJoin = from first in firstNames
        join last in lastNames
        on first.ID equals last.ID
        into temp
        from last in temp.DefaultIfEmpty()
        select new
        {
            id = first != null ? first.ID : last.ID,
            firstname = first != null ? first.Name : string.Empty,
            surname = last != null ? last.Name : string.Empty
        };
    }
}

public class FirstName
{
    public int ID;

    public string Name;
}

public class LastName
{
    public int ID;

    public string Name;
}

But this returns:

ID  FirstName  LastName
--  ---------  --------
 1  John       Doe
 2  Sue

What am I doing wrong?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 31 down vote accepted

I don't know if this covers all cases, logically it seems correct. The idea is to take a left outer join and right outer join and combine them together (as it should be).

var firstNames = new[]
{
    new { ID = 1, Name = "John" },
    new { ID = 2, Name = "Sue" },
};
var lastNames = new[]
{
    new { ID = 1, Name = "Doe" },
    new { ID = 3, Name = "Smith" },
};
var leftOuterJoin = from first in firstNames
                    join last in lastNames
                    on first.ID equals last.ID
                    into temp
                    from last in temp.DefaultIfEmpty(new { first.ID, Name = default(string) })
                    select new
                    {
                        first.ID,
                        FirstName = first.Name,
                        LastName = last.Name,
                    };
var rightOuterJoin = from last in lastNames
                     join first in firstNames
                     on last.ID equals first.ID
                     into temp
                     from first in temp.DefaultIfEmpty(new { last.ID, Name = default(string) })
                     select new
                     {
                         last.ID,
                         FirstName = first.Name,
                         LastName = last.Name,
                     };
var fullOuterJoin = leftOuterJoin.Union(rightOuterJoin);

This works as written since it is in LINQ to Objects. If LINQ to SQL or other, the overload of DefaultIfEmpty() that takes in a default may not work. Then you'd have to use the conditional operator to conditionally get the values.

i.e.,

var leftOuterJoin = from first in firstNames
                    join last in lastNames
                    on first.ID equals last.ID
                    into temp
                    from last in temp.DefaultIfEmpty()
                    select new
                    {
                        first.ID,
                        FirstName = first.Name,
                        LastName = last != null ? last.Name : default(string),
                    };
share|improve this answer
1  
Union will eliminate duplicates. If you are not expecting duplicates, or can write the second query to exclude anything that was included in the first, use Concat instead. This is the SQL difference between UNION and UNION ALL –  cadrell0 Mar 30 '11 at 20:01
1  
@cadre110 duplicates will occur if a person has a first name and a last name, so union is a valid choice. –  saus Mar 31 '11 at 0:50
1  
@saus but there is an ID column, so even if there is a duplicate first and last name, the ID should be different –  cadrell0 Apr 1 '11 at 3:02
    
@cadrell: I don't see why you would want the duplicates here any way. Full outer joins don't include them AFAIK. You're not going to save anything here by using Concat(). If the data was disjoint, then you might save a few cycles, but that would make the implementation not very robust and only work with only some data sets. One might argue that it would be a premature optimization. –  Jeff Mercado Apr 1 '11 at 5:23
1  
@CandyChiu: I actually never ran into such a case. I guess that's a limitation with your query provider. You'll probably want to use LINQ to Objects in that case by calling AsEnumerable() before you perform the union/concatenation. Try that and see how that goes. If this is not the route you want to go, I'm not sure I can be of any more help than that. –  Jeff Mercado Mar 27 '12 at 16:51

Update 1: providing a truly generalized extension method FullOuterJoin
Update 2: optionally accepting a custom IEqualityComparer for the key type

Edit Added FullOuterGroupJoin (ideone). I reused the GetOuter<> implementation, making this a fraction less performant than it could be, but I'm aiming for 'highlevel' code, not bleeding-edge optimized, right now.

See it live on http://ideone.com/O36nWc

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var ax = new[] { 
        new { id = 1, name = "John" },
        new { id = 2, name = "Sue" } };
    var bx = new[] { 
        new { id = 1, surname = "Doe" },
        new { id = 3, surname = "Smith" } };

    ax.FullOuterJoin(bx, a => a.id, b => b.id, (a, b, id) => new {a, b})
        .ToList().ForEach(Console.WriteLine);
}

Prints the output:

{ a = { id = 1, name = John }, b = { id = 1, surname = Doe } }
{ a = { id = 2, name = Sue }, b =  }
{ a = , b = { id = 3, surname = Smith } }

You could also supply defaults: http://ideone.com/kG4kqO

    ax.FullOuterJoin(
            bx, a => a.id, b => b.id, 
            (a, b, id) => new { a.name, b.surname },
            new { id = -1, name    = "(no firstname)" },
            new { id = -2, surname = "(no surname)" }
        )

Printing:

{ name = John, surname = Doe }
{ name = Sue, surname = (no surname) }
{ name = (no firstname), surname = Smith }

Explanation of terms used:

Joining is a term borrowed from relational database design:

  • A join will repeat elements from a as many times as there are elements in b with corresponding key (i.e.: nothing if b were empty). Database lingo calls this inner (equi)join.
  • An outer join includes elements from a for which no corresponding element exists in b. (i.e.: even results if b were empty). This is usually referred to as left join.
  • A full outer join includes records from a as well as b if no corresponding element exists in the other. (i.e. even results if a were empty)

Something not usually seen in RDBMS is a group join[1]:

  • A group join, does the same as described above, but instead of repeating elements from a for multiple corresponding b, it groups the records with corresponding keys. This is often more convenient when you wish to enumerate through 'joined' records, based on a common key.

See also GroupJoin which contains some general background explanations as well.


[1] (I believe Oracle and MSSQL have proprietary extensions for this)

Full code

A generalized 'drop-in' Extension class for this

internal static class MyExtensions
{
    internal static IList<TR> FullOuterGroupJoin<TA, TB, TK, TR>(
        this IEnumerable<TA> a,
        IEnumerable<TB> b,
        Func<TA, TK> selectKeyA, 
        Func<TB, TK> selectKeyB,
        Func<IEnumerable<TA>, IEnumerable<TB>, TK, TR> projection,
        IEqualityComparer<TK> cmp = null)
    {
        cmp = cmp?? EqualityComparer<TK>.Default;
        var alookup = a.ToLookup(selectKeyA, cmp);
        var blookup = b.ToLookup(selectKeyB, cmp);

        var keys = new HashSet<TK>(alookup.Select(p => p.Key), cmp);
        keys.UnionWith(blookup.Select(p => p.Key));

        var join = from key in keys
                   let xa = alookup[key]
                   let xb = blookup[key]
                   select projection(xa, xb, key);

        return join.ToList();
    }

    internal static IList<TR> FullOuterJoin<TA, TB, TK, TR>(
        this IEnumerable<TA> a,
        IEnumerable<TB> b,
        Func<TA, TK> selectKeyA, 
        Func<TB, TK> selectKeyB,
        Func<TA, TB, TK, TR> projection,
        TA defaultA = default(TA), 
        TB defaultB = default(TB),
        IEqualityComparer<TK> cmp = null)
    {
        cmp = cmp?? EqualityComparer<TK>.Default;
        var alookup = a.ToLookup(selectKeyA, cmp);
        var blookup = b.ToLookup(selectKeyB, cmp);

        var keys = new HashSet<TK>(alookup.Select(p => p.Key), cmp);
        keys.UnionWith(blookup.Select(p => p.Key));

        var join = from key in keys
                   from xa in alookup[key].DefaultIfEmpty(defaultA)
                   from xb in blookup[key].DefaultIfEmpty(defaultB)
                   select projection(xa, xb, key);

        return join.ToList();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Edited to show the usage of the FullOuterJoin extension method provided –  sehe Nov 22 '12 at 10:48
    
Edited: FullOuterGroupJoin extension method added –  sehe Nov 22 '12 at 14:13
1  
Instead of using a Dictionary, you can use a Lookup, which contains the functionality expressed in your helper extension methods. For example, you can write a.GroupBy(selectKeyA).ToDictionary(); as a.ToLookup(selectKeyA) and adict.OuterGet(key) as alookup[key]. Getting the collection of keys is a little trickier, though: alookup.Select(x => x.Keys). –  Risky Martin Dec 1 '12 at 19:47
    
@RiskyMartin Thanks! That, indeed, makes the whole thing more elegant. I updated the answer and the ideone-s. (I suppose the performance should be increased since fewer objects are instantiated). –  sehe Dec 1 '12 at 20:23
    
Hi, thanks for the example... code works great! Can you explain though what the first function, FullOuterGroupJoin does? –  eidylon Feb 1 '13 at 6:33

As you've found, Linq doesn't have an "outer join" construct. The closest you can get is a left outer join using the query you stated. To this, you can add any elements of the lastname list that aren't represented in the join:

outerJoin = outerJoin.Concat(lastNames.Select(l=>new
                            {
                                id = l.ID,
                                firstname = String.Empty,
                                surname = l.Name
                            }).Where(l=>!outerJoin.Any(o=>o.id == l.id)));
share|improve this answer

Actually Full Outer Join of the List1 and List2 could be:

A. Left Outer Join between List1 (all items of List1) and List2 (items matched with List1)

B. Items from List2 those could not be included in the result set of A-Left Outer Join.

C. Merge the result set B with the A.

Below code might give you better performance. Referring the same example given by "Jeff Mercado"

var firstNames = new[]
{
    new { ID = 1, Name = "John" },
    new { ID = 2, Name = "Sue" },
};
var lastNames = new[]
{
    new { ID = 1, Name = "Doe" },
    new { ID = 3, Name = "Smith" },
};
var leftData = (from first in firstNames
                join last in lastNames on first.ID equals last.ID into temp
                from last in temp.DefaultIfEmpty(new { first.ID, Name = default(string) })
                select new
                {
                   first.ID,
                   FirstName = first.Name,
                   LastName = last.Name,
                 });

var rightRemainingData = (from r in lastNames
                          where !(from a in leftData select a.ID).Contains(r.ID)
                          select new
                          {
                             r.ID,
                             FirstName = default(string),
                             LastName = r.Name
                           });

var fullOuterjoinData = leftData.Concat(rightRemainingData);
share|improve this answer
3  
If you're saying it's better performance, you should really back that up with reasoning. –  Simon Halsey Feb 2 '12 at 12:48

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