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This is the opposite of Turning a Hash of Arrays into an Array of Hashes in Ruby.

Elegantly and/or efficiently turn an array of hashes into a hash where the values are arrays of all values:

hs = [
  { a:1, b:2 },
  { a:3, c:4 },
  { b:5, d:6 }
]
collect_values( hs )
#=> { :a=>[1,3], :b=>[2,5], :c=>[4], :d=>[6] }

This terse code almost works, but fails to create an array when there are no duplicates:

def collect_values( hashes )
  hashes.inject({}){ |a,b| a.merge(b){ |_,x,y| [*x,*y] } }
end
collect_values( hs )
#=> { :a=>[1,3], :b=>[2,5], :c=>4, :d=>6 }

This code works, but can you write a better version?

def collect_values( hashes )
  # Requires Ruby 1.8.7+ for Object#tap
  Hash.new{ |h,k| h[k]=[] }.tap do |result|
    hashes.each{ |h| h.each{ |k,v| result[k]<<v } }
  end
end

Solutions that only work in Ruby 1.9 are acceptable, but should be noted as such.

Update: Benchmarking Results

Here are the results of benchmarking the various answers below (and a few more of my own), using three different arrays of hashes:

  • one where each hash has distinct keys, so no merging ever occurs:
    [{:a=>1}, {:b=>2}, {:c=>3}, {:d=>4}, {:e=>5}, {:f=>6}, {:g=>7}, ...]

  • one where every hash has the same key, so maximum merging occurs:
    [{:a=>1}, {:a=>2}, {:a=>3}, {:a=>4}, {:a=>5}, {:a=>6}, {:a=>7}, ...]

  • and one that is a mix of unique and shared keys:
    [{:c=>1}, {:d=>1}, {:c=>2}, {:f=>1}, {:c=>1, :d=>1}, {:h=>1}, {:c=>3}, ...]
               user     system      total        real
Phrogz 2a  0.577000   0.000000   0.577000 (  0.576000)
Phrogz 2b  0.624000   0.000000   0.624000 (  0.620000)
Glenn 1    0.640000   0.000000   0.640000 (  0.641000)
Phrogz 1   0.671000   0.000000   0.671000 (  0.668000)
Michael 1  0.702000   0.000000   0.702000 (  0.700000)
Michael 2  0.717000   0.000000   0.717000 (  0.726000)
Glenn 2    0.765000   0.000000   0.765000 (  0.764000)
fl00r      0.827000   0.000000   0.827000 (  0.836000)
sawa       0.874000   0.000000   0.874000 (  0.868000)
Tokland 1  0.873000   0.000000   0.873000 (  0.876000)
Tokland 2  1.077000   0.000000   1.077000 (  1.073000)
Phrogz 3   2.106000   0.093000   2.199000 (  2.209000)

The fastest code is this method that I added:

def collect_values(hashes)
  {}.tap{ |r| hashes.each{ |h| h.each{ |k,v| (r[k]||=[]) << v } } }
end

I've accepted glenn mcdonald's answer as it was competitive in terms of speed, reasonably terse, but (most importantly) because it pointed out the danger of using a Hash with a self-modifying default proc for convenient construction, as this may introduce bad changes when the user is indexing it later on.

Finally, here's the benchmark code, in case you want to run your own comparisons:

require 'prime'   # To generate the third hash
require 'facets'  # For tokland1's map_by
AZSYMBOLS = (:a..:z).to_a
TESTS = {
  '26 Distinct Hashes'   => AZSYMBOLS.zip(1..26).map{|a| Hash[*a] },
  '26 Same-Key Hashes'   => ([:a]*26).zip(1..26).map{|a| Hash[*a] },
  '26 Mixed-Keys Hashes' => (2..27).map do |i|
    factors = i.prime_division.transpose
    Hash[AZSYMBOLS.values_at(*factors.first).zip(factors.last)]
  end
}

def phrogz1(hashes)
  Hash.new{ |h,k| h[k]=[] }.tap do |result|
    hashes.each{ |h| h.each{ |k,v| result[k]<<v } }
  end
end
def phrogz2a(hashes)
  {}.tap{ |r| hashes.each{ |h| h.each{ |k,v| (r[k]||=[]) << v } } }
end
def phrogz2b(hashes)
  hashes.each_with_object({}){ |h,r| h.each{ |k,v| (r[k]||=[]) << v } }
end
def phrogz3(hashes)
  result = hashes.inject({}){ |a,b| a.merge(b){ |_,x,y| [*x,*y] } }
  result.each{ |k,v| result[k] = [v] unless v.is_a? Array }
end
def glenn1(hs)
  hs.reduce({}) {|h,pairs| pairs.each {|k,v| (h[k] ||= []) << v}; h}
end
def glenn2(hs)
  hs.map(&:to_a).flatten(1).reduce({}) {|h,(k,v)| (h[k] ||= []) << v; h}
end
def fl00r(hs)
  h = Hash.new{|h,k| h[k]=[]}
  hs.map(&:to_a).flatten(1).each{|v| h[v[0]] << v[1]}
  h
end
def sawa(a)
  a.map(&:to_a).flatten(1).group_by{|k,v| k}.each_value{|v| v.map!{|k,v| v}}
end
def michael1(hashes)
  h = Hash.new{|h,k| h[k]=[]}
  hashes.each_with_object(h) do |h, result|
    h.each{ |k, v| result[k] << v }
  end
end
def michael2(hashes)
  h = Hash.new{|h,k| h[k]=[]}
  hashes.inject(h) do |result, h|
    h.each{ |k, v| result[k] << v }
    result
  end
end
def tokland1(hs)
  hs.map(&:to_a).flatten(1).map_by{ |k, v| [k, v] }
end
def tokland2(hs)
  Hash[hs.map(&:to_a).flatten(1).group_by(&:first).map{ |k, vs|
    [k, vs.map{|o|o[1]}]
  }]
end

require 'benchmark'
N = 10_000
Benchmark.bm do |x|
  x.report('Phrogz 2a'){ TESTS.each{ |n,h| N.times{ phrogz2a(h) } } }
  x.report('Phrogz 2b'){ TESTS.each{ |n,h| N.times{ phrogz2b(h) } } }
  x.report('Glenn 1  '){ TESTS.each{ |n,h| N.times{ glenn1(h)   } } }
  x.report('Phrogz 1 '){ TESTS.each{ |n,h| N.times{ phrogz1(h)  } } }
  x.report('Michael 1'){ TESTS.each{ |n,h| N.times{ michael1(h) } } }
  x.report('Michael 2'){ TESTS.each{ |n,h| N.times{ michael2(h) } } }
  x.report('Glenn 2  '){ TESTS.each{ |n,h| N.times{ glenn2(h)   } } }
  x.report('fl00r    '){ TESTS.each{ |n,h| N.times{ fl00r(h)    } } }
  x.report('sawa     '){ TESTS.each{ |n,h| N.times{ sawa(h)     } } }
  x.report('Tokland 1'){ TESTS.each{ |n,h| N.times{ tokland1(h) } } }
  x.report('Tokland 2'){ TESTS.each{ |n,h| N.times{ tokland2(h) } } }
  x.report('Phrogz 3 '){ TESTS.each{ |n,h| N.times{ phrogz3(h)  } } }

end
share|improve this question
    
If you needed this functionality, feel free to vote this question up so that others can find it. I asked this and included some working code because (as far as I can tell) there is no good answer for this already on Stack Overflow. –  Phrogz Mar 30 '11 at 19:06
    
+1 for an interesting question, alas I couldn't come up with anything nicer than your working solution so far. –  Michael Kohl Mar 30 '11 at 19:24
1  
I think each answer should provide a standardized benchmark result too based on your hs. –  the Tin Man Mar 31 '11 at 2:57
1  
@theTinMan Ask and you shall receive :) –  Phrogz Mar 31 '11 at 17:48

6 Answers 6

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Take your pick:

hs.reduce({}) {|h,pairs| pairs.each {|k,v| (h[k] ||= []) << v}; h}

hs.map(&:to_a).flatten(1).reduce({}) {|h,(k,v)| (h[k] ||= []) << v; h}

I'm strongly against messing with the defaults for hashes, as the other suggestions do, because then checking for a value modifies the hash, which seems very wrong to me.

share|improve this answer
    
second solution will be mych faster I think –  fl00r Mar 30 '11 at 20:19
1  
That's an excellent point that my Hash-with-default_proc is being returned with the default_proc intact, and thus affecting future usage. (Will +1 when I get more votes.) –  Phrogz Mar 30 '11 at 20:21
    
In a quick performance test, the second of these is about 1.5x slower than the first. Why did you expect the second one to be faster, fl00r? –  glenn mcdonald Mar 30 '11 at 20:39
    
I thought first one is O(n2), obviously I was wrong –  fl00r Mar 31 '11 at 17:21
h = Hash.new{|h,k| h[k]=[]}
hs.map(&:to_a).flatten(1).each{|v| h[v[0]] << v[1]}
share|improve this answer

How's this?

def collect_values(hashes)
  h = Hash.new{|h,k| h[k]=[]}
  hashes.each_with_object(h) do |h, result|
    h.each{ |k, v| result[k] << v }
  end
end

Edit - Also possible with inject, but IMHO not as nice:

def collect_values( hashes )
  h = Hash.new{|h,k| h[k]=[]}
  hashes.inject(h) do |result, h|
    h.each{ |k, v| result[k] << v }
    result
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
Why doesnt h = Hash.new([]) work? I am getting a {} for that. –  rubyprince Mar 31 '11 at 4:39
    
@rubyprince That doesn't work because a) it only returns an array when you ask for a non-existent key, but does not set the key to that array, and b) it returns the same array for every key. Run this code in IRB and ponder the output: h=Hash.new([]); p h[1]; p h; h[:foo] << :a; p h[:bar]; p h –  Phrogz Mar 31 '11 at 16:39
    
I wish I could upvote you twice for reminding me about each_with_object. Interestingly, however, using it turns out to be more characters and slower than just using tap. (Compare phrogz2a and phrogz2b methods in the benchmark.) –  Phrogz Mar 31 '11 at 18:00

Same with some other answers using map(&:to_a).flatten(1). The problem is how to modify the values of the hash. I used the fact that arrays are mutable.

def collect_values a
  a.map(&:to_a).flatten(1).group_by{|k, v| k}.
  each_value{|v| v.map!{|k, v| v}}
end
share|improve this answer

Facet's Enumerable#map_by comes in handy for these cases. This implementation will be no doubt slower than others, but modular and compact code is always easier to maintain:

require 'facets'
hs.flat_map(&:to_a).map_by { |k, v| [k, v] }
#=> {:b=>[2, 5], :d=>[6], :c=>[4], :a=>[1, 3]
share|improve this answer
    
Where does your #second method come from? –  Phrogz May 9 '11 at 21:54
    
@Phrogz: active_support. I used it just to be concise, write the typical block if AS is not loaded. –  tokland May 10 '11 at 6:53
    
Thanks, I wrote a simple block and benchmarked your answers against the others, and updated the summary in the question. –  Phrogz May 10 '11 at 15:19

I thought it might be interesting to compare the winner:

def phrogz2a(hashes)
  {}.tap{ |r| hashes.each{ |h| h.each{ |k,v| (r[k]||=[]) << v } } }
end

with a slight variant:

def phrogz2ai(hashes)
  Hash.new {|h,k| h[k]=[]}.tap {|r| hashes.each {|h| h.each {|k,v| r[k] << v}}}
end

because one can often employ either approach (typically to create an empty array or hash).

Using Phrogz's benchmark code, here's how they compare here:

            user     system      total        real
Phrogz 2a   0.440000   0.010000   0.450000 (  0.444435)
Phrogz 2ai  0.580000   0.010000   0.590000 (  0.580248)
share|improve this answer
    
That is interesting. Thanks for that. –  Phrogz Feb 17 at 2:51

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