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Okay so basically I'm just having some trouble understanding the difference between these two code segments I allocate space for an array of integers dynamically within my code with a statement

int *arr = calloc(cnt, sizeof(int));

In another function where I pass in arr, I would like to determine the size (number elements) in arr. When I call

int arr_sz = sizeof(arr)/sizeof(int);

it only returns 1, which is just the number of bytes in an int for both arguments I am assuming (4/4)=1. I just assumed it would be the same as using an array

  int arr[8];
  int arr_sz = sizeof(arr)/sizeof(int);

which returns the actual number of elements in the array.

If anyone could clearthis up that would be great. Thanks!

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Arrays are just pointers the compiler can help you manage. Once they pass through a function, or if dynamically allocated, the compiler can't help you. –  uʍop ǝpısdn Mar 30 '11 at 20:22
    
@Santiago Lezica:: Arrays are just pointers the compiler can help you manage --> This is strange. Please go through - lysator.liu.se/c/c-faq/c-2.html –  al-Acme Mar 30 '11 at 20:27
    
You cut half my comment in your quote. The other half was important. There is obviously a difference between char a[10] and char* a, different things happen when you type one line or the other. –  uʍop ǝpısdn Mar 30 '11 at 20:34
    
possible duplicate of Is array name a pointer in C? –  Jens Gustedt Mar 30 '11 at 21:18
    
@Jens Gustedt:: Nopes sizeof and dynamic memory allocation still need an answer. –  al-Acme Mar 30 '11 at 21:51

7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted
int *arr;   ----> Pointer
int arr[8]; ----> Array

First up what you got there - int *arr is a pointer, pointing to some bytes of memory location, not an array.

The type of an Array and a Pointer is not the same.

In another function where I pass in arr, I would like to determine the size (number elements) in arr. When I call

int arr_sz = sizeof(arr)/sizeof(int);

it only returns 1, which is just the number of bytes in an int for both arguments I am assuming (4/4)=1. I just assumed it would be the same as using an array

Even if it is assumed to be an Array -- that's because Arrays get decayed into pointers when passed into functions. You need to explicitly pass the array size in functions as a separate argument.

Go through this:

Sizeof an array in the C programming language?

There is a difference between a static array and dynamic memory allocation.

The sizeof operator will not work on dynamic allocations. AFAIK it works best with stack-based and predefined types.

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Was arr ever an array? It's been a while since I've done C and my memory is not good but I did not think the way arr was declared and initialised would have ever made it an array? –  Dan Kendall Mar 30 '11 at 20:19
    
This. There is no way to dynamically determine the size of an array in C –  David Brown Mar 30 '11 at 20:20

well, int *arr declares a pointer, a variable which keeps the address of some other variable, and its size is the size of an integer because it's a pointer, it just have to keep the address, not the pointee itself.
int arr[8] declares an array, a collection of integers. sizeof(arr) refers to the size of the entire collection, so 8*sizeof(int).
Often you hear that "array and pointers are the same things". That's not true! They're different things.

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Mike,

arr is a pointer and as such, on your system at least, has the same number of bytes as int. Array's are not always the same as pointers to the array type.

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sizeof(arr) is the same as sizeof(int*), i.e. the size of a single pointer. You can however calculate arr_sz as ... cnt!

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*arr is not the same as arr[8] since it's size is not known in compile time, and sizeof is a function of the compiler. So when your arr is *arr sizeof will return the size of the pointer (sizeof(int *))in bytes, while when your arr is arr[8], the sizeof will return the size of array of 8 integers in bytes (which is sizeof(int) * 8).

When you pass a pointer to array to a function, you must specify its size, because the compiler can't do it for you. Another way is to end the array with null element, and perform a while loop.

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If you have int arr1[8] the type of arr1 (as far as the compiler is concerned) is an array ints of size 8.

In the example int * arr2 the type of arr2 is pointer to an integer.

sizeof(arr1) is the size of an int array
sizeof(arr2) is the size of an int pointer (4 bytes on a 32 bit system, 8 bytes on a 64 bit system)

So, the only difference is the type which the compiler thinks that variable is.

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You can't use sizeof with memory pointers:

int *arr = calloc(cnt, sizeof(int));

But it's ok to use it with arrays:

int arr[8];
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