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I'm currently using the above tags in this way (classic tag order):

<html>
  <head>...</head>
  <body>
    <header>...</header>
    <section>...</section>
    <footer>...</footer>
  </body>
</html>

Tag usage and specifications were very rigid in previous versions of HTML (4.x), while HTML5 doesn't really need <head> and even <body> tags.

So I would use the following structure, which IMHO is much more semantic than the previous one.

<html>
  <header>...</header>     <!-- put header and footer outside the body tag -->
  <body>
    <section>...</section>
    <section>...</section>
    <section>...</section>
  </body>
  <footer>...</footer>
</html>

What do you think?

share|improve this question
    
HTML5 is forgiving, but not that forgiving. the fact that you already include a BODY element, redundantly declare the BODY then close the BODY before the inclusion of FOOTER renders this invalid, I believe. There are lots of nice "implicits" with HTML5, but improperly terminating elements is going to sting you –  rob - not a robber Mar 30 '11 at 21:26
    
You need a TITLE at least... –  Šime Vidas Mar 30 '11 at 21:49
    
The rules over the presence and absence of the head and body tags is exactly the same in HTML5 as it is in HTML 4.x. In fact, they're exactly the same as they were in HTML 2.0. Only XHTML is different. –  Alohci Mar 31 '11 at 0:17

5 Answers 5

Well, the <head> tag has nothing to do with the <header> tag. In the head comes all the metadata and stuff, since the header is just a layout component.
And layout comes into body. So I disagree with you.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree with @iuliux, all display content should be in the <body>, so <header> and <footer> should always be inside there. Like he said <head> is just for metadata –  cander Mar 30 '11 at 21:26
1  
Yup. <body> means the body of the HTML document, i.e. the entirety of what the browser is expected to render. “More semantic” means more meaningful, and whilst your idea might be more meaningful to you (and indeed others), it’s not the meaning agreed in the HTML spec. –  Paul D. Waite Mar 30 '11 at 21:30

Let's get a canonical answer here. I will reference the HTML5 spec.

First of all, 12.1.2.4 Optional tags:

A head element's start tag may be omitted if the element is empty, or if the first thing inside the head element is an element.

A head element's end tag may be omitted if the head element is not immediately followed by a space character or a comment.

A body element's start tag may be omitted if the element is empty, or if the first thing inside the body element is not a space character or a comment, except if the first thing inside the body element is a script or style element.

A body element's end tag may be omitted if the body element is not immediately followed by a comment.

Then, the 4.1.1 The html element:

Content model: A head element followed by a body element.

Having the cited restrictions and strictly defined element order, we can easily work out what are the rules for placing implicit <body> tag.

Since <head/> must come first, and it can contain elements only (and not direct text), all elements suitable for <head/> will become the part of implicit <head/>, up to the first stray text or <body/>-specific element. At that moment, all remaining elements and text nodes will be placed in <body/>.


Now let's consider your second snippet:

<html>
  <header>...</header>
  <body>
    <section>...</section>
    <section>...</section>
    <section>...</section>
  </body>
  <footer>...</footer>
</html>

Here, the <header/> element is not suitable for <head/> (it's flow content), the <body> tag will be placed immediately before it. In other words, the document will be understood by browser as following:

<html>
  <head/>
  <body>
    <header>...</header>
    <body>
      <section>...</section>
      <section>...</section>
      <section>...</section>
    </body>
    <footer>...</footer>
  </body>
</html>

And that's certainly not what you were expecting. And as a note, it is invalid as well; see 4.4.1 The body element:

Contexts in which this element can be used: As the second element in an html element.

[...]

In conforming documents, there is only one body element.


Thus, the <header/> or <footer/> will be correctly used in this context. Well, they will be practically equivalent to the first snippet. But this will cause an additional <body/> element in middle of a <body/> which is invalid.


As a side note, you're probably confusing <body/> here with the main part of the content which has no specific element. You could look up that page for other solutions on getting what you want.

Quoting 4.4.1 The body element once again:

The body element represents the main content of the document.

which means all the content. And both header and footer are part of this content.

share|improve this answer

According to the HTML standard, the content model of the HTML element is:

A head element followed by a body element.

You can either define the BODY element in the source code:

<html>
    <body>
        ... web-page ...
    </body>
</html>

or you can omit the BODY element:

<html>
    ... web-page ...
</html>

However, it is invalid to place the BODY element inside the web-page content (in-between other elements or text content), like so:

<html>
    ... content ...
    <body>
        ... content ...
    </body>
    ... content ...
</html>
share|improve this answer
1  
No, actually it won't. The inner body element won't exist. The explicit body tags are effectively ignored (although the implicitly created body element adopts any attributes on the start tag). See here: software.hixie.ch/utilities/js/live-dom-viewer/… –  Alohci Mar 31 '11 at 0:02
    
@Alohci You're right. This behavior is even cross-browser. This is interesting because the HTML code is invalid. –  Šime Vidas Mar 31 '11 at 0:19

Even though the <head> and <body> tags aren't required, the elements are still there - it's just that the browser can work out where the tags would have been from the rest of the document.

The other elements you're using still have to be inside the <body>

share|improve this answer

I agree with some of the others' answers. The <head> and <header> tags have two unique and very unrelated functions. The <header> tag, if I'm not mistaken, was introduced in HTML5 and was created for increased accessibility, namely for screen readers. It's generally used to indicate the heading of your document and, in order to work appropriately and effectively, should be placed inside the <body> tag. The <head> tag, since it's origin, is used for SEO in that it constructs all of the necessary meta data and such. A valid HTML structure for your page with both tags included would be like something like this:

<!DOCTYPE html/>
<html lang="es">
    <head>
        <!--crazy meta stuff here-->
    </head>
    <body>
        <header>
            <!--Optional nav tag-->
            <nav>
            </nav>
        </header>
        <!--Body content-->
    </body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
Almost. The header element provides semantic value, one of many such elements added in HTML5. –  james.garriss Oct 3 '12 at 14:22
    
<pedantic>"...is used for SEO in that it constructs all of the necessary meta data..." -- I'd say this is backwards; <head> is meant for metadata, which may be SEO-oriented. </pedantic> –  Dan Lugg Nov 7 '13 at 13:50

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