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It seems very inconvenient that jQuery's $.getJSON silently fails when the data returned is not valid JSON. Why was this implemented with silent failure? What is the easiest way to perform getJSON with better failure behavior (e.g. throw an exception, console.log(), or whatever)?

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4  
While adequate answers were provided for my problem, I'm still baffled that the devs would program silent failure into $.getJSON...wtf jQuery guys? – Dan Burton Mar 30 '11 at 23:26
up vote 58 down vote accepted

you can use

        function name() {
            $.getJSON("", function(d) {
                alert("success");
            }).done(function(d) {
                alert("success");
            }).fail(function(d) {
                alert("error");
            }).always(function(d) {
                alert("complete");
            });
        }

If you want to see the cause of the error, use the full version

function name() {
    $.getJSON("", function(d) {
        alert("success");
    }).fail( function(d, textStatus, error) {
        console.error("getJSON failed, status: " + textStatus + ", error: "+error)
    });
}

If your JSON is not well-formed, you will see something like

getJSON failed, status: parsererror, error: SyntaxError: JSON Parse error: Unrecognized token '/'

If the URL is wrong, you will see something like

getJSON failed, status: error, error: Not Found

If you are trying to get JSON from another domain, violating the Same-origin policy, this approach returns an empty message. Note that you can work around the Same-origin policy by using JSONP (which has it's limitations) or the preferred method of Cross-origin Resource Sharing (CORS).

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3  
This should be the current accepted answer – Juan Cortes Nov 21 '12 at 12:44
3  
Note that .error is deprecated - best to use .fail instead: api.jquery.com/jQuery.ajax – micapam Apr 11 '13 at 2:44
    
Why you will use this? instead of ajax? while this is a wrap for ajax method right? So basically would be better use Ajax when you want to handle all this "status".. what do you think? – ncubica Jun 5 '13 at 19:44
    
Doesn't help me actually see what the error was. – superluminary Sep 3 '13 at 15:01
1  
@superluminary: use fail(function(d, textStatus, error)... I've just edited the answer. – osa Oct 7 '13 at 21:13

Straight from the documentation:

Important: As of jQuery 1.4, if the JSON file contains a syntax error, the request will usually fail silently.

As the documentation page says, getJSON is simply a shorthand method for

$.ajax({
    url: url,
    dataType: 'json',
    data: data,
    success: callback
});

To get failure behavior, you can use $.ajax like this:

$.ajax({
    url: url,
    dataType: 'json',
    data: data,
    success: callback,
    error: another callback
});
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3  
+1 the shorthand $.getJSON was convenient, but not flexible enough to be truly useful. /sigh. – Dan Burton Mar 30 '11 at 23:24
1  
The documentation is clear, but this doesn't explain why it silently fails. What is the rationale behind the layer responsible for parsing a String into a JavaScript Object being silent about errors by default? – semperos Jan 18 '12 at 19:22
3  
The shorthand is useful with the new promise syntax $.getJSON(...).error(function() {...}) – Paul Tyng Nov 3 '12 at 19:29

You can use $.ajax instead, and set the dataType options to "json". From the documentation:

"json": Evaluates the response as JSON and returns a JavaScript object. In jQuery 1.4 the JSON data is parsed in a strict manner; any malformed JSON is rejected and a parse error is thrown. (See json.org for more information on proper JSON formatting.)

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+1 Apparently $.ajax also catches the parse error and sends information about it to the error callback, as mentioned by Håvard. – Dan Burton Mar 30 '11 at 23:25

You should have a look at the docs for this API... it has a .error on it.

http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.getJSON/

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+1 That would actually be a great solution if I weren't stuck with jQuery 1.4... – Dan Burton Mar 30 '11 at 23:11
    
The .success(), .error(), and .complete() callback methods introduced in jQuery 1.5 are deprecated as of jQuery 1.8. – Jim Bergman Feb 27 '14 at 10:16

If you're requesting JSONP as the response, you will get a silent fail if there is no response (e.g. network outage). See this thread for details.

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