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I'm seeing some very strange behaviour in CoffeeScript/NodeJS regarding EventEmitters and handlers. I've put together a small sample which exhibits the issue...

Essentially I have some indirection in my event handling, but I can't seem to get it to work unless I wrap the first event handler in a lambda, and I want to understand why/if there is something I could do to make this work. Essentially test1() below should, to my way of thinking, have the same behaviour as test3(). test2() is included just to show that the second level of event handling works!

events = require "events"

class ExampleEmitter extends events.EventEmitter
    constructor: () ->
    go1: () -> 
        console.log("fire 1")
        @emit("test1", "there")
    go2: () -> 
        console.log("fire 2")
        @emit("test2", "there")

class ExampleHandler
    constructor: () ->
    handle: (x) -> console.log("hey", x)

test1 = () ->        
    handler  = new ExampleHandler()
    emitter1 = new ExampleEmitter()
    emitter2 = new ExampleEmitter()
    emitter1.on "test1", emitter2.go2
    emitter2.on "test2", handler.handle #this doesn't fire :(
    emitter1.go1()

test2 = () ->        
    handler  = new ExampleHandler()
    emitter1 = new ExampleEmitter()
    emitter2 = new ExampleEmitter()
    emitter1.on "test1", emitter2.go2
    emitter2.on "test2", handler.handle
    emitter2.go2()

test3 = () ->        
    handler  = new ExampleHandler()
    emitter1 = new ExampleEmitter()
    emitter2 = new ExampleEmitter()
    emitter1.on "test1", () -> emitter2.go2() #why must I wrap this?
    emitter2.on "test2", handler.handle
    emitter1.go1()

console.log "\ntest1"
test1()
console.log "\ntest2"
test2()
console.log "\ntest3"
test3()

This is the output:

test1
fire 1
fire 2

test2
fire 2
hey there

test3
fire 1
fire 2
hey there
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

emitter1.on "test1", () -> emitter2.go2() #why must I wrap this?

Because if you just pass emitter2.go2, go2 is going to be called in the context of the root object (window in the browser; I don't know node.js too well) instead of emitter2. A function on its own doesn't know anything about the object it belongs to. You should be passing a closure to both of your calls to on, in fact.

To make things look a little nicer, you can omit the parentheses if your closure doesn't take any parameters. Ultimately, you should have something that looks like this:

handler  = new ExampleHandler()
emitter1 = new ExampleEmitter()
emitter2 = new ExampleEmitter()
emitter1.on "test1", -> emitter2.go2()
emitter2.on "test2", -> handler.handle()
emitter1.go1()

If you still don't like the look of that, the next best thing would be to use a function that "binds" functions to objects by creating such a closure. It won't save you any typing, though, and I think it looks ugly and hard to read:

bindMethod = (obj, funcName) ->
    -> obj[funcName].apply(obj, arguments)

...

emitter1.on "test1", bindMethod(emitter2, 'go2')
emitter2.on "test2", bindMethod(handler, 'handle')

Finally, you can use the fat arrow => to create such bound methods in the class declaration so that you can pass them around as you see fit. go2: -> ... would become go2: => ..., &c. In this context, though, I think that's a weird behavior. I'd stick with passing closures because it makes the meaning more clear.

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1  
Well said. Whenever you've got a bug in JavaScript or CoffeeScript, the first thing you should ask is: "What is this?" (Or @, which is synonymous.) In this case, I'd go ahead and define go2 with the fat arrow => to bind it to the instance, so that this always means what you want it to. –  Trevor Burnham Mar 31 '11 at 0:51
1  
Since this is for node, you'd rather do emitter2.go2.bind(emitter2) instead of reinventing bindMethod. –  matyr Mar 31 '11 at 1:13
    
Great answer, thank you! What is the downside/weird behaviour of using the => 'fat arrow' in this case? It seems like exactly what I'm looking for, no? –  nicolaskruchten Mar 31 '11 at 3:18
    
@matyr thanks for catching that; as stated, I'm not too familiar with node. :) –  Eris Mar 31 '11 at 3:33
    
@nicolaskruchten To me, the main downside is that you wouldn't be able to rebind go2 to another object if you wanted or needed to, although to be honest it probably won't be a problem. Trevor actually suggests using it, and I'll defer to him because he seems to have more experience than I do. :) –  Eris Mar 31 '11 at 3:37
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I'll just add another answer here, even though I've accepted the one above, in case people don't read the comments...

The actual fix for my problem, to get the behaviour I'm looking for, is to use the => 'fat arrow' in my class definitions rather than the normal -> 'thin arrow' as I did, to bind the functions to the instance of the class. So:

class ExampleEmitter extends events.EventEmitter
    constructor: () ->
    go1: () => 
        console.log("fire 1")
        @emit("test1", "there")
    go2: () => 
        console.log("fire 2")
        @emit("test2", "there")
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At first I didn't think this would work, but CoffeeScript appears to have special handling for a fat arrow when used to define an instance method for a class. It defines the method on the prototype as normal, but it actually adds this.go1 = __bind(this.go1, this); into the constructor for you, replacing the prototype method with one that will always run in the context on the instance. Very tricky CoffeeScript, you slippery fox... –  Alex Wayne Mar 31 '11 at 17:12
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