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I've developed a website more than a year ago. The content were/is in two languages and now I need to build a database driven update/data insertion system for them to inserte some news, events etc. Is the best approach to create tables like this:

news_id         int(10) unsigned PK
lang_id         int(2)
status          tinyint(1)
title           varchar(255)
title_en        varchar(255)
title_es        varchar(255)
content         text
content_en      text
content_es      text
date_inserted   datetime
date_modified   datetime
type            varchar(45)
atach           text

then create a table for the languages

share|improve this question
    
IMO: Better to keep it as 1 table. – drudge Mar 30 '11 at 23:00
1  
Do you have any specific requirements which cannot be met by a mature CMS like Drupal? – Emyr Mar 30 '11 at 23:01
    
The site wasn't created using a CMS so I would have to almost rebuild the site to adapt it to the CMS. – tenshimsm Apr 1 '11 at 21:27
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should only care about one language for any one particular request. While you could only select the language that the page request requires, it still isn't best practice to organise your content in such a way.

What you should do is use locales and provide defaults for a content. Because while you might think you will always create two versions of a piece of content, in a less than perfect world this doesn't always happen.

So, you would first create your model to reflect this relationship. For simplicity I will just refer to this as content. But you could of course have your content to be anything.

`content` (The Table)
id
status
title
content
dataCreated
dateModified
owner

`contentTranslations` (The Table)
id
contentId (FK)
locale
title
content
dateCreated
dateModified

Now, you just need a way to know which locale the user wishes to use. I prefer using Zend_Locale for managing all of my locales, and Zend_Translate for short key=>value translations. (This isn't suitable for long content translations though).

When you know which locale you want to use, all you need to do is perform your query to select with a join.

The Beauty

The beauty of all of this however, is that if you haven't created your content for a particular language version, then you can still default and roll onto your base language which the original article/content was written in.

SELECT c.id, c.status, c.title, c.content
FROM content as c
LEFT JOIN contentTranslations as t
ON c.id = t.contentId
WHERE c.id = 21231 AND t.locale = X
share|improve this answer
    
Thank for the answer. I'll try it, but I am not experienced in use of databases and I haven't worked with Foreign Keys yet. – tenshimsm Apr 1 '11 at 21:35
    
So to use I'll have to create a double INSERT to fill the tables and it seams to work only with PROCEDURES (that`s what I meant "... not experienced in use of databases ...". – tenshimsm Apr 3 '11 at 15:28

Keeping everything in one database is the way to go if you're only going to have two languages and if the amount of language specific fields is not high.

But for the long run it might be better to split it into two databases, one of them holding the data that doesnt depend on the language, the other one for the translations. This will allow you to easily add more languages in the future

"NEWS" database:

news_id         int(10) 
status          tinyint(1)
date_inserted   datetime
date_modified   datetime
type            varchar(45)
atach           text

"TRANSLATIONS" database:

translation_id  int(10) 
news_id         int(10) 
lang_id         int(2)
title           varchar(255)
content         text

BUT, this might also be slow in certain circumstances. Not sure how much traffic does that site get.

Btw: since I can see the type is a varchar(45) I asume thats might also be language related?

share|improve this answer
    
Thank for the answer. Basically the site will have just two languages, but be prepared is the best thing to do. :) The varchar(45) actually is for the title of the section where the content is going and is language dependant and changed it to section. – tenshimsm Apr 2 '11 at 16:55

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