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I have this simple sample on VS2010:

using System;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            AbsClass absClass = new ConClass();
            // I have tried this also and the error is different:
            // ConClass absClass = new ConClass();
            absClass.Id = "first";
            Console.WriteLine(absClass.Id);
            MyMethod(ref absClass);  // <<- ERROR.
            Console.WriteLine(absClass.Id);
            Console.ReadKey();
        }

        public void MyMethod(ref AbsClass a)
        {
            a.Id = "new";
        }
    }

    public abstract class AbsClass
    {
        public string Id { get; set; }
    }

    public class ConClass : AbsClass { }
}

I would like to know why this cannot build right.

========== After Femared answer this modified code runs fine ==============

using System;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Manager manager = new Manager();
            AbsClass absClass = new ConClass();
            absClass.Id = "first";
            Console.WriteLine(absClass.Id);
            manager.MyMethod(ref absClass);  // <<- ERROR.
            Console.WriteLine(absClass.Id);
            Console.ReadKey();
        }


    }

    public class Manager
    {
        public void MyMethod(ref AbsClass a)
        {
            a.Id = "new";
        }
    }


    public abstract class AbsClass
    {
        public virtual string Id { get; set; }
    }

    public class ConClass : AbsClass { }
}
share|improve this question
    
What's the compiler error that you get? –  Cole W Mar 30 '11 at 22:58
    
"An object reference is required for the non-static field, method, or property 'ConsoleApplication1.Program.MyMethod(ref ConsoleApplication1.AbsClass)'" - kinda says it all, no? –  Marc Gravell Mar 30 '11 at 23:02
    
@Femaref's answer is correct. The reason the commented-out version (with ConClass) doesn't work is that the type of variable passed as an argument to a ref parameter must match exactly to the type of the parameter. This ensures that any assignments in the method will work OK. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Mar 30 '11 at 23:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need to make your MyMethod static:

    public static void MyMethod(ref AbsClass a)
    {
        a.Id = "new";
    }

The problem isn't the abstract class, the "problem" is the static Main method. Static methods don't have an instance, and as such, can't call instance methods.

msdn on static classes and static members.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, right. It runs now as static. But why ? Or, please, some link to official documentation to read about it ? –  ferpega Mar 30 '11 at 23:03
    
Sorry... I was not seen your comment below the code. Do you mean if I put it on a non Main static method original code will run fine ? –  ferpega Mar 30 '11 at 23:06
    
I added a link, but in a nutshell, the reason is already in the post. The Main method is static, and as such, isn't associated with a particular instance of the class Program. Resulting of that, it can only call other methods that don't rely on an instance of Program as well. –  Femaref Mar 30 '11 at 23:07
    
No, it doesn't - the Main method is the entry point for your application, the runtime looks for a static Main method in your code. If it doesn't find one, you'll get an exception and the program won't run. –  Femaref Mar 30 '11 at 23:07
    
I think understand it. For future readers I will put a code in the question that runs fine with MyMethod without static clause (inside a manager class). Thanks Femaref. –  ferpega Mar 30 '11 at 23:12

You either need to make your MyMethod method static:

public static MyMethod(ref AbsClass a)
{
    a.Id = "new";
}

Or preferrably, create an instance of the Program class, and call MyMethod from that instance:

Program p = new Program();
p.MyMethod(ref abs);

The reason why the first method works is because the Main method is marked static, and isn't tied to an instance of the Program class. The .NET Framework CLR searches through your assembly for a static method named Main that takes an array of String, and makes that function the entry point. You'll notice that a lot of tutorials and even MSDN code samples mark the Program class with the static keyword, which is considered best practice when all of the methods in a class contain only static methods.

The reason why the second method works, and why this method is preferred, is because you defined MyMethod to be an instance method. Basically, you need an instance of an object in order to execute an instance method; the new keyword creates an instance of a specified type. Static methods can be called without an instance of an object, but also cannot access any non-static instance members (properties, private/public variables, etc). Generally, you want to avoid static methods and classes unless you must implement a utility class, utilize extension methods, or provide helper methods.

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