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Since hearing about __HALT_COMPILER in PHP, I've been doing some experimentation with a single-file PHP installers (scripts containing a compressed archive of a filetree for a webapp).

It seems to be easy enough to generate a script that contains both the archive and the logic for unpacking it and taking care of configuration. But permissions/user related issues seem to be a bit more thorny. It's highly likely (except in suexec/CGI cases) the PHP process is running as whatever user the webserver runs as, and so it likely doesn't have permissions to write in whatever directory it's running in. I suppose this issue can be skirted if the user knows how to temporarily change the permissions of the directory targeted for the install, but part of the idea behind single-file installs is to simplify what the user has to do, so I don't like this much. More important, though, once the install is done, it seems to me the files and subdirectories are going to be owned by the webserver user, and they'll therefore be unmanageable by the user (except via more web scripts).

I've thought a little bit about trying to use su or sudo to fix this. However, I'm not sure how to navigate the password prompt that's going to follow an issued su/sudo command. It's my understanding sudo also may be limited to a subset of users.

Is there a good way to create PHP installer scripts which write files that have user-tinkering-friendly ownership and permissions?

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AFAIK there is no 'nice' solution, hence all those packages that ask you to set different / other permissions. –  Wrikken Mar 30 '11 at 23:33
    
run the installer from a the command line instead of the browser, or make the entire app run from the within the package with a Phar (>=5.3 only) –  prodigitalson Mar 30 '11 at 23:45
    
The su line of thinking would actually let me have the script from the web run itself via the command line with the right user permissions... if I can figure out how to interact with the prompt... –  Weston C Mar 30 '11 at 23:56
    
@prodigitalson: FYI 5.2 also supports Phar via the PECL extension. –  netcoder Mar 31 '11 at 0:56
    
@Weston C: You can't interact with a shell easily in PHP without the use of a third-party extension (e.g.: Expect). Besides, when you said "so it likely doesn't have permissions to write in whatever directory it's running in", well then I say they probably don't have permission to write to it for a reason... If one can't figure out the basic concept of permissions and how to change them, they probably shouldn't install software in the first place. –  netcoder Mar 31 '11 at 1:01
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Is there a good way to create PHP installer scripts which write files that have user-tinkering-friendly ownership and permissions?

I've only ever seen this pulled off successfully using one method, and it's horrible/funny: FTP. The FTP extension is usually enabled, and when it isn't, you have a variety of other options. FTP usually operates as the correct user, making file ownership and permissions a breeze. Many commercial (and OSS) consumer-grade PHP packages use FTP trickery to make things a bit more smooth.

Though as mentioned by others, if you're targeting geeks, people with their own machines (dedicated or virtualized) or anything other than the consumer-grade market, a PEAR or PEAR2 distro would please people, and if you're targeting 5.3 only, a phar distro is completely suitable.

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