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Hi there I have come form the java camp and am trying to do a c++ program

I have an array called Manifest that takes passenger objects

for (int i = 0; i< _totalSeats; i++) 
{
    if (Manifest[i] != instanceOf Passenger) {
        cout<<"empty"endl;
    }
    else {
        cout<< PassengerToString(i);
    }
}

obviously the 'instanceOf' is a problem in C++, I know is==null doesn't work as there is no such thing as null without being specificly inserted but to build a blank passenger objects then insert them in each array slot sounds messy and costly. Is there a more elegent way?

thanks

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5 Answers 5

It sounds like you're mapping seats to passengers. This means a map may be a better choice, such as std::map<int, Passenger> Manifest.

for example

#include <map>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>
class Passenger
{
        public:
                std::string toString() const
                {
                        return "Passenger";
                }
};

int main()
{
        std::map<int, Passenger> Manifest;
        Manifest[2] = Passenger();
        int _totalSeats = 10;

         for (int i = 0; i< _totalSeats; i++)
         {
             if (Manifest.count(i))
                     std::cout << Manifest[i].toString() << '\n';
             else
                     std::cout << "empty\n";
         }
}

test run: https://ideone.com/XkNOg

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You can't really create an array of objects in C++ without constructing them all (well, actually, you can, but it's ugly, black magic stuff.) Don't use arrays -- use std::vector.

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You can have null in C++, provided you hold object pointers.

struct Passenger
{
    std::string name_;
};

std::string PassengerToString(const Passenger& p)
{
    return p.name_;
}


int main() 
{


    const int _totalSeats= 10;
    Passenger* Manifest[_totalSeats]  = {0};

    for (int i = 0; i< _totalSeats;i++)
    {
        if (Manifest[i] != 0)
        {
            std::cout<<"empty" << std::endl;
        }
        else
        {
            std::cout<< PassengerToString(*Manifest[i]) << std::endl;;
        }


    }

    return 0;
}

For real production code, you would use something like shared_ptr<>, but for an exercise in learning C++ post Java, doing this the low level way using raw pointers might be instructive.

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The cleanest way, would be to only store objects that are valid in the container. So, instead of using a fixed-size array, you can use a std::vector<Passenger> and add and remove Passengers to it as needed.

If the position of the Passenger objects is important (i.e., the index is important), you can easily use a std::map<int, Passenger>.

Otherwise, there are numerous approaches to solve the problem:

  • Use a container of smart pointers (for example, std::vector<std::unique_ptr<Passenger>> or std::vector<std::shared_ptr<Passenger> >) or a pointer container (for example, boost::ptr_vector<Passenger>) and store pointers to dynamically allocated objects.

  • Use a designated "null object" (the approach you describe). Whether the "null object" is the default state of the object or an explicitly set state is up to you.

  • Use a container of struct { bool valid_; Passenger object_; }; as a crude "optional" type wrapper (this requires Passenger to be default constructible but does not require the default constructed object to be meaningful).

  • Use Boost.Optional

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Thank you all for you assistance

I was restricted in what data structures I was allowed to use (I thought a map would have been a much better choice but they chose array....)

here is how I solved the problem in the end

as Friedman-hill so correctly mentioned when I dynamicly created my array it required a blank constructor of type Passenger to initalise. I simply added a private data member bool "isEmpty" initalised to false to my consturctor. then checked like so:

if (!Manifest[i].getIsEmpty())

thanks again

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