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I was about to build my own IEnumerable class that performs some action on all items the first time something iterates over it then I started wondering, does the framework already have something that I could use?

Here's what I was building so you have an idea what I'm looking for:

public class DelayedExecutionIEnumerable<T> : IEnumerable<T>
{
    IEnumerable<T> Items;
    Action<T> Action;
    bool ActionPerformed;

    public DelayedExecutionIEnumerable(IEnumerable<T> items, Action<T> action)
    {
        this.Items = items;
        this.Action = action;
    }

    void DoAction()
    {
        if (!ActionPerformed)
        {
            foreach (var i in Items)
            {
                Action(i);
            }
            ActionPerformed = true;
        }
    }

    #region IEnumerable<IEntity> Members

    public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
    {
        DoAction();
        return Items.GetEnumerator();
    }

    #endregion

    #region IEnumerable Members

    System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        DoAction();
        return Items.GetEnumerator();
    }

    #endregion
}
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What would the purpose of this be? –  FreeAsInBeer Mar 31 '11 at 4:03
1  
I'm not aware of anything built into the framework, and your implementation seems to do what you want. The only thing I would mention is that your code could easily run into problems if multiple threads called GetEnumerator() concurrently. –  dlev Mar 31 '11 at 4:06
3  
Why do you want to loop through and perform your action on all of them before returning any? You could more easily perform the action and yield return each item as you iterate thus requiring only one iteration and further defering execution of the action. –  Samuel Neff Mar 31 '11 at 4:21
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Iterators and yield allows you to easily create your own lazy enumerator sequence.

Also in your case, you could easily abuse Select method of LINQ.

items.Select(i=>{DoStuff(i); return i;});

Maybe wrapping it up?

public static IEnumerable<T> DoStuff<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items, Action<T> doStuff)
{
    return items.Select(i=>{doStuff(i); return i;});
}

(hand-written not tested code, use with caution)

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I'm not sure there is something that does exactly what you are trying to do, but I would recommend you to use Lazy<T> for this, it will take care of Thread safety issues (for each individual item):

public class DelayedExecutionIEnumerable<T> : IEnumerable<T>
{
    List<Lazy<T>> LazyItems;

    public DelayedExecutionIEnumerable(IEnumerable<T> items, Action<T> action)
    {
        // Wrap items into our List of Lazy items, the action predicate
        // will be executed only once on each item the first time it is iterated.
        this.LazyItems = items.Select(
            item => new Lazy<T>(
                () => 
                    {
                        action(item);
                        return item;
                    }, 
                    true)).ToList(); // isThreadSafe = true 
    }

    #region IEnumerable<IEntity> Members

    public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return this.LazyItems.Select(i => i.Value).GetEnumerator();
    }

    #endregion


    #region IEnumerable Members

    System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return this.LazyItems.Select(i => i.Value).GetEnumerator();
    }

    #endregion
}  
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