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i have buf="\x00\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF\x00"

how can i get the "\xFF\xFF\xFF\xFF" randomize

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5 Answers 5

up vote 14 down vote accepted
>>> import os
>>> "\x00"+os.urandom(4)+"\x00"
'\x00!\xc0zK\x00'
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1  
i just check the python doc.. whats different with ''.join(chr(random.randint(0,255)) for _ in range(4)) –  zack Mar 31 '11 at 6:06
6  
@zack, apart from being more efficent, randint returns pseudo-random numbers. urandom returns random bytes that are suitable for cryptographic use –  gnibbler Mar 31 '11 at 6:12

Do you want the middle 4 bytes to be set to a random value?

buf = '\x00' + ''.join(chr(random.randint(0,255)) for _ in range(4)) + '\x00'
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yes..thank you very much... –  zack Mar 31 '11 at 5:52

On POSIX platforms:

open("/dev/urandom","rb").read(4)

Use /dev/random for better randomization.

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in practice, this is about 2.5 times faster than os.urandom if you leave the file descriptor open between calls. useful for random guesses at nonces for cryptocurrency hashes. –  jcomeau_ictx Jan 3 at 2:14

Simple:

import random, operator
reduce(operator.add, ('%c' % random.randint(0, 255) for i in range(4)))
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That will return a string representation of a list, not a string as the OP asked. –  yan Mar 31 '11 at 5:03
    
@yan Whoops, good spot. –  bradley.ayers Mar 31 '11 at 5:06
1  
"".join(...) is the preferred way to turn a sequence into a string –  gnibbler Mar 31 '11 at 5:16
from random import randint 
rstr = ''.join( randint(0, 255) for i in range(4) )
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NameError: name 'buf' is not defined –  bradley.ayers Mar 31 '11 at 5:03
    
Comment by anonymous user: You can't join anything but a list of strings into a string so change the int to string character. Code: rstr = "".join( chr(randint(0, 255)) for i in range(4)). –  Anne Nov 15 '11 at 12:19

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