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I make a logging application and I have a LogEvent object with some string properties on it. I want to make this logging asynchronous and in another thread for not blocking the applications GUI thread.

Idea is that when I start application, some LogEventThread is running on the background all the time. If LogEvent property has changed then thread is executed, after execution thread suspends and waits another LogEvent object property change and run it again if new property change is captured.

Which are the best practises to design this?

EDIT:

I created an example. Please tell me if I'm on the correct path.

I have a Form1:

unit MainWindow;

interface

uses Windows, Messages, SysUtils, Variants, Classes, Graphics, Controls, Forms,
Dialogs, StdCtrls, TrackEventSenderThread, Generics.Collections, TrackEvent;

type
  TForm1 = class(TForm)
    btnTest: TButton;
    procedure FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
    procedure btnTestClick(Sender: TObject);

  private
    teqTrackEventSenderThread: TTrackEventSenderThread;
    trackEventQueue: TThreadedQueue<TTrackEvent>;

  end;

var
  Form1: TForm1;

implementation

{$R *.dfm}

procedure TForm1.btnTestClick(Sender: TObject);
var
  trackEvent: TTrackEvent;

begin
  trackEvent := TTrackEvent.Create;
  trackEvent.Category := 'test';
  trackEvent.Action := 'test';

  trackEventQueue.PushItem(trackEvent);
end;

procedure TForm1.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
begin
  trackEventQueue := TThreadedQueue<TTrackEvent>.Create;

  teqTrackEventSenderThread := TTrackEventSenderThread.Create(True);
  teqTrackEventSenderThread.TrackEventQueue := trackEventQueue;

  teqTrackEventSenderThread.Start;
end;

end.

TrackEvent class:

unit TrackEvent;

interface

type
  TTrackEvent = class(TObject)

  private
    sCategory: string;
    sAction: string;

  public
    property Category: string read sCategory write sCategory;
    property Action: string read sAction write sAction;

  end;

implementation

end.

And thread class:

unit TrackEventSenderThread;

interface

uses Classes, Generics.Collections, TrackEvent;

type
  TTrackEventSenderThread = class(TThread)

  private
    trackEvent: TTrackEvent;
    teqTrackEventQueue: TThreadedQueue<TTrackEvent>;

  public
    constructor Create(CreateSuspended: Boolean);
    property TrackEventQueue: TThreadedQueue<TTrackEvent> read teqTrackEventQueue write teqTrackEventQueue;


  protected
    procedure Execute; override;

  end;

implementation

constructor TTrackEventSenderThread.Create(CreateSuspended: Boolean);
begin
  inherited;
end;

procedure TTrackEventSenderThread.Execute;
begin
  while not Terminated do
  begin
    if teqTrackEventQueue.QueueSize > 0 then
    begin
      trackEvent := teqTrackEventQueue.PopItem;

      //send data to server
    end;
  end;
end;

end.
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can build a thread-safe Queue class which is used in a Producer-Consumer model. Your TThread descendant class should own an instance of this Queue class.

When you start your application, your queue is empty, and your logging thread is blocked waiting for queue. When you push a new string into the queue from the main thread, your queue pulses the logging thread, your logging thread wakes up and pops items from the queue until the queue is empty again.

To implement the queue in Delphi 2010, you can use TQueue generic class as the base type, and use System.TMonitor for synchronization. In Delphi XE, there is already a class which implements this for you, named TThreadedQueue. So If you are using Delphi XE, create an instance of TThreadedQueue, and in your logging thread try to call its PopItem() method.

EDIT:

Here is a sample logging thread which receives string logs:

unit uLoggingThread;

interface

uses
  SysUtils, Classes, Generics.Collections, SyncObjs {$IFDEF MSWINDOWS} , Windows {$ENDIF};

type
  TLoggingThread = class(TThread)
  private
    FFileName : string;
    FLogQueue : TThreadedQueue<string>;
  protected
    procedure Execute; override;
  public
    constructor Create(const FileName: string);
    destructor Destroy; override;
    property LogQueue: TThreadedQueue<string> read FLogQueue;
  end;

implementation

{ TLoggingThread }

constructor TLoggingThread.Create(const FileName: string);
begin
  inherited Create(False);
  FFileName := FileName;
  FLogQueue := TThreadedQueue<string>.Create;
end;

destructor TLoggingThread.Destroy;
begin
  FLogQueue.Free;
  inherited;
end;

procedure TLoggingThread.Execute;
var
  LogFile : TFileStream;
  FileMode : Word;
  ALog : string;
begin
  NameThreadForDebugging('Logging Thread');
//  FreeOnTerminate := True;

  if FileExists(FFileName) then
    FileMode := fmOpenWrite or fmShareDenyWrite
  else
    FileMode := fmCreate or fmShareDenyWrite;
  LogFile := TFileStream.Create(FFileName,FileMode);
  try
    while not Terminated do
    begin
      ALog := FLogQueue.PopItem;
      if (ALog <> '')  then
        LogFile.Write(ALog[1],Length(ALog)*SizeOf(Char));
    end;
  finally
    LogFile.Free;
  end;
end;

end.

This TThread descendant uses a TThreadedQueue object as a buffer. When FLogQueue.PopItem is called, if the queue is empty, the thread goes to sleep, and waits until something is pushed into the queue. When an item is available in the queue, the thread pops it, and writes it to a file. This is a very simple code to just let you understand the basics of what you should do.

And here is a sample code for a form which is running in the context of main thread, and is logging a sample message:

unit fMain;

interface

uses
  Windows, Messages, SysUtils, Variants, Classes, Graphics, Controls, Forms,
  Dialogs, StdCtrls, uLogginThread;

type
  TfrmMain = class(TForm)
    btnAddLog: TButton;
    procedure FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
    procedure FormDestroy(Sender: TObject);
    procedure btnAddLogClick(Sender: TObject);
  private
    FLoggingThread : TLoggingThread;
  public
    { Public declarations }
  end;

var
  frmMain: TfrmMain;

implementation

{$R *.dfm}

procedure TfrmMain.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
begin
  FLoggingThread := TLoggingThread.Create(ExtractFilePath(Application.ExeName) + 'Logs.txt');
end;

procedure TfrmMain.FormDestroy(Sender: TObject);
begin
  FLoggingThread.Terminate;
  FLoggingThread.LogQueue.DoShutDown;
  FLoggingThread.WaitFor;
  FreeAndNil(FLoggingThread);
end;

procedure TfrmMain.btnAddLogClick(Sender: TObject);
begin
  FLoggingThread.LogQueue.PushItem('This is a test log. ');
end;

end.

Here an instance of TLoggingThread is created when the form is initialized. When you press btnAddLog, a sample message is sent to the logger thread via its LogQueue property. Take note of how the thread is terminated in FormDestroy method. First the thread is signaled that it is terminated, then we tell LogQueue to release any lock, so if the logger thread is waiting for the queue, it will wake up automatically after calling DoShutDown. Then we wait for the thread to finish up by calling WaitFor method, and eventually we destroy the thread instance.

Good Luck

share|improve this answer
    
let me understand and correct me, if I'm wrong. I create a TThreadedQueue object in Form1 and also I create TThread object there. I give TThreadedQueue object as property to TThread object. Then call TThread.Start() method. In Form1 on button click I add LogEvent object to the queue. In Execute method I call PopItem() method until queue is empty? –  evilone Mar 31 '11 at 9:40
    
added example to my question, please see if it's ok. –  evilone Mar 31 '11 at 11:56
    
@evilone: Added example to my answer to help you understand it better. I hope it is helpful now. –  vcldeveloper Mar 31 '11 at 13:09
    
Thanks, it was very helpful!!! Now I understand this...Thread is started automatically if item is pushed into the queue, we don't need to start the thread calling TThread.Start(). –  evilone Mar 31 '11 at 15:10

In a multi-threaded application, use TEvent to allow one thread to signal to other threads that an event has occurred.

http://docwiki.embarcadero.com/VCL/en/SyncObjs.TEvent

share|improve this answer
    
I have only one thread that executes the action to send logevent to server –  evilone Mar 31 '11 at 8:44
    
As far as I understand your question, you have TWO treads: main thread (GUI) and logging thread (that sends events to server). –  Roman Yankovsky Mar 31 '11 at 8:53

I would use a Queue of strings with a critical section inside push() and pop(). Inside the thread I would pop strings off, and log them. Inside the GUI thread I would push strings on the queue. I have done something similar before, and it is simple to implement.


Edit

Interface:

TThreadSafeQueue = class(TQueue)
protected
  procedure PushItem(AItem: Pointer); override;
  function PopItem: Pointer; override;
  function PeekItem: Pointer; override;
end;

var
  CRITICAL_SECTION: TCriticalSection;

Implementation:

function TThreadSafeQueue.PeekItem: Pointer;
begin
  CRITICAL_SECTION.Enter;
  Result := inherited PeekItem;
  CRITICAL_SECTION.Leave;
end;

function TThreadSafeQueue.PopItem: Pointer;
begin
  CRITICAL_SECTION.Enter;
  Result := inherited PopItem;
  CRITICAL_SECTION.Leave;
end;

procedure TThreadSafeQueue.PushItem(AItem: Pointer);
begin
  CRITICAL_SECTION.Enter;
  inherited PushItem(AItem);
  CRITICAL_SECTION.Leave;
end;

Initialization

CRITICAL_SECTION := TCriticalSection.Create;

Finalization

FreeAndNil(CRITICAL_SECTION);

This code uses pointers to objects, but you can create storage for your strings inside the object, using a stringlist or array or whatever best fits your purpose, and change the pop and push methods to operate on your own storage.


Edit

Something like this:

procedure TMyThread.Execute;
var
  Msg: string;
begin
  while not Terminated do
  begin
    if FQueue.Count > 0 then
    begin
      Msg := FQueue.pop();
      PerformLog(Msg); {Whatever your logging method is}
    end;
    Sleep(0); 
  end;
end;      
share|improve this answer
    
yes I thought queue to use too, because it logs to server and it need to hold maybe multiple object for some time. Can you provide me some simple example, then this answer will be accepted :) –  evilone Mar 31 '11 at 7:00
    
ok, but how can I use this on Thread class? –  evilone Mar 31 '11 at 7:38
    
The code added above is only a rough suggestion. If you want me to write a complete working example for you, I can submit a quote? –  cjrh Mar 31 '11 at 9:30
    
Thanks, I think I could do it with TThreadedQueue the same thing like @vcldeveloper suggested. Only I do not understand, how I send this TThreadedQueue to the TThread class, like a property? –  evilone Mar 31 '11 at 9:46

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