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This is not homework, this is an interview question.

The catch here is that the algorithm should be constant space. I'm pretty clueless on how to do this without a stack, I'd post what I've written using a stack, but it's not relevant anyway.

Here's what I've tried: I attempted to do a pre-order traversal and I got to the left-most node, but I'm stuck there. I don't know how to "recurse" back up without a stack/parent pointer.

Any help would be appreciated.

(I'm tagging it as Java since that's what I'm comfortable using, but it's pretty language agnostic as is apparent.)

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2  
I don't see a way of doing this without a stack or parent pointer either. –  zebediah49 Mar 31 '11 at 7:26
    
Mh, does each node have a reference to it's parent? –  ChrisWue Mar 31 '11 at 7:30
    
@ChrisWue - nope, that would have been straight-forward :) –  user183037 Mar 31 '11 at 7:32
1  
are you sure he asked for a pre-order traversal and not just any other traversal? –  Suraj Chandran Mar 31 '11 at 7:33
    
Any traversal would work, I just began with a pre-order traversal because that's what I know best. –  user183037 Mar 31 '11 at 7:36

9 Answers 9

up vote 18 down vote accepted

I didn't think it through entirely, but i think it's possible as long as you're willing to mess up your tree in the process.

Every Node has 2 pointers, so it could be used to represent a doubly-linked list. Suppose you advance from Root to Root.Left=Current. Now Root.Left pointer is useless, so assign it to be Current.Right and proceed to Current.Left. By the time you reach leftmost child, you'll have a linked list with trees hanging off of some nodes. Now iterate over that, repeating the process for every tree you encounter as you go

EDIT: thought it through. Here's the algorithm that prints in-order:

void traverse (Node root) {
  traverse (root.left, root);
}

void traverse (Node current, Node parent) {
  while (current != null) {
    if (parent != null) {
      parent.left = current.right;
      current.right = parent;
    }

    if (current.left != null) {
      parent = current;
      current = current.left;
    } else {
      print(current);
      current = current.right;
      parent = null;
    }
  }
}
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1  
Oh yes, that is a good idea. It's called pointer reversal and sometimes used by garbage collectors. It has relation to Huet's zipper. But as you said, it messes up your tree and often violates static type safety. –  jmg Mar 31 '11 at 7:41
1  
That looks like it's going to work very well - thank you! –  user183037 Mar 31 '11 at 7:56
    
(+1) for the idea, but please explain why you think this has O(n) time complexity. –  NPE Mar 31 '11 at 9:56
    
Because every node gets visited exactly once (one iteration, one node), and there's a constant amount of operations in an iteration –  iluxa Mar 31 '11 at 10:00
    
What happens if the root just has a right subtree .. it will never enter the while loop and the tree would not be traversed ! ... while(current != null|| parent!= null) should fix it imo .. –  codeObserver Jul 13 '11 at 5:35

How about Morris Inorder tree traversal? Its based on the notion of threaded trees and it modifies the tree, but reverts it back when its done.

Linkie: http://geeksforgeeks.org/?p=6358

Doesn't use any extra space.

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Thank you - so this was what was being asked for. Thanks again! –  user183037 Mar 31 '11 at 21:41
1  
If it helps you any bit, I asked a question about how the tree is restored here: stackoverflow.com/questions/5502916/… –  brainydexter Mar 31 '11 at 21:49
    
Thank you - that thread made it all the more clear. –  user183037 Apr 1 '11 at 2:10
    
@user183037 Interesting concept, but this does not use a Binary Search Tree, so it isn't quite inline with the OP's question. Binary Search Tree being left values are always less than and right values are always greater than the value of the parent node. –  Levitikon Jan 25 '13 at 13:28
    
@brainydexter Good link but the Morris traversal explained runs in O(nlogn) time complexity and not O(n) time as asked. –  Nikunj Banka Mar 21 at 7:32

If you are using a downwards pointer based tree and don't have a parent pointer or some other memory it is impossible to traverse in constant space.

It is possible if your binary tree is in an array instead of a pointer-based object structure. But then you can access any node directly. Which is a kind of cheating ;-)

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1  
Well, I wouldn't call that cheating, but you're forgetting that the algorithm needs to run on constant space - introducing an array is going to take O(N) space :) –  user183037 Mar 31 '11 at 7:30
    
@user183037: No, I meant if the tree is genuinely stored in an array instead of a pointer based structure. Such a representation is unusual but sometimes very efficient and useful. I'll edit my answer to make that clear. –  jmg Mar 31 '11 at 7:32
    
I think jmg means that the original tree you want to traverse is already stored in an array. –  ChrisWue Mar 31 '11 at 7:34
    
@ChrisWue: Exactly, that is what I meant. –  jmg Mar 31 '11 at 7:35
    
and @ChrisWue - sorry, my bad. But I doubt that it would have been an array implementation. Good catch though! –  user183037 Mar 31 '11 at 7:39

It's a a search tree, so you can always get the next key/entry

You need smth like (I didn't test the code, but it's as simple as it gets)

java.util.NavigableMap<K, V> map=...
for (Entry<K, V> e = map.firstEntry(); e!=null; e = map.higherEntry(e.getKey())) {
  process(e)
}

for clarity this is higherEntry, so it's not recursive. There you have it :)

final Entry<K,V> getHigherEntry(K key) {
    Entry<K,V> p = root;
    while (p != null) {
        int cmp = compare(key, p.key);
        if (cmp < 0) {
            if (p.left != null)
                p = p.left;
            else
                return p;
        } else {
            if (p.right != null) {
                p = p.right;
            } else {
                Entry<K,V> parent = p.parent;
                Entry<K,V> ch = p;
                while (parent != null && ch == parent.right) {
                    ch = parent;
                    parent = parent.parent;
                }
                return parent;
            }
        }
    }
    return null;
}
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3  
Do you the line Entry<K,V> parent = p.parent;. This is the line where this code uses a parent pointer. Which is usually not present in a binary search tree. Otherwise, the interview question would be trivial. –  jmg Mar 31 '11 at 7:45
1  
And, this is not O(N) either AFAIK. –  user183037 Mar 31 '11 at 7:46
    
it's N*logN, but you can keep the pointer to the node to remove the logN. –  bestsss Mar 31 '11 at 7:50
    
@jmg, no one said there should be no parent. Red/Black is definitely a binary search tree. –  bestsss Mar 31 '11 at 7:54
    
@bestsss: Yes, but this implementation is more than just a binary search tree. –  jmg Mar 31 '11 at 7:55

The title of the question doesn't mention the lack of a "parent" pointer in the node. Although it isn't necessarily required for BST, many binary tree implementations do have a parent pointer. class Node { Node* left; Node* right; Node* parent; DATA data; };

It this is the case, imaging a diagram of the tree on paper, and draw with a pencil around the tree, going up and down, from both sides of the edges (when going down, you'll be left of the edge, and when going up, you'll be on the right side). Basically, there are 4 states:

  1. SouthWest: You are on the left side of the edge, going from the parent its left child
  2. NorthEast: Going from a left child, back to its parent
  3. SouthEast: Going from a parent to a right child
  4. NorthWest: Going from a right child, back to its parent

Traverse( Node* node )
{
    enum DIRECTION {SW, NE, SE, NW};
    DIRECTION direction=SW;

    while( node )
    {
        // first, output the node data, if I'm on my way down:
        if( direction==SE or direction==SW ) {
            out_stream << node->data;
        }

        switch( direction ) {
        case SW:                
            if( node->left ) {
                // if we have a left child, keep going down left
                node = node->left;
            }
            else if( node->right ) {
                // we don't have a left child, go right
                node = node->right;
                DIRECTION = SE;
            }
            else {
                // no children, go up.
                DIRECTION = NE;
            }
            break;
        case SE:
            if( node->left ) {
                DIRECTION = SW;
                node = node->left;
            }
            else if( node->right ) {
                node = node->right;
            }
            else {
                DIRECTION = NW;
            }
            break;
        case NE:
            if( node->right ) {
                // take a u-turn back to the right node
                node = node->right;
                DIRECTION = SE;
            }
            else {
                node = node->parent;
            }
            break;
        case NW:
            node = node->parent;
            break;
        }
    }
}
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Please read the question description, there's a point to a description field you know :p There is no parent pointer, if there was, the answer is trivial. –  user183037 Mar 31 '11 at 15:25

Accepted answer needs the following change otherwise it will not print the tree where the BST only has one node

if (current == NULL && root != NULL)
   print(root);
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Here's a shorter version iluxa's original answer. It runs exactly the same node manipulation and printing steps, in exactly the same order — but in a simplified manner [1]:

void traverse (Node n) {
  while (n) {
    Node next = n.left;
    if (next) {
      n.left = next.right;
      next.right = n;
      n = next;
    } else {
      print(n);
      n = n.right;
    }
  }
}

[1] Plus, it even works when the tree root node has no left child.

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It's a binary search tree, so every node can be reached by a series of right/left decision. Describe that series as 0/1, least-significant bit to most-significant. So the function f(0) means "the node found by taking the right-hand branch until you find a leaf; f(1) means take one left and the rest right; f(2) -- that is, binary 010 -- means take a right, then a left, then rights until you find a leaf. Iterate f(n) starting at n=0 until you have hit every leaf. Not efficient (since you have to start at the top of the tree each time) but constant memory and linear time.

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4  
You need log(n) bits to do this, so I doubt this qualifies as "constant space". –  NPE Mar 31 '11 at 7:28
1  
this isn't linear time, it's nlogn if the tree is balanced and worse if it is not. –  Bwmat Mar 31 '11 at 7:32
2  
@jmg - recursion is log(n) space. Anything that's in any way dependent on size of input (N) is f(N) and is not constant. If the tree isn't balanced, depth of recursion will equal N - how can you call that constant? –  iluxa Mar 31 '11 at 7:52
1  
@jmg ok then. It's just that 2 comments ago you suggested that when "you can determine beforehand how much memory you will need, it's constant space", and that's incorrect. –  iluxa Mar 31 '11 at 8:04
1  
it's constant space if you can determine beforehand an upper bound for the space needed, independent of n –  Bwmat Mar 31 '11 at 8:06

We can traverse the binary tree without modifying the tree itself (provided nodes have parent pointer). And it can be done in constant space. I found this useful link for the same http://tech.technoflirt.com/2011/03/04/non-recursive-tree-traversal-in-on-using-constant-space/

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1  
Sigh. there is no parent pointer. If there was one, it would have been a trivial solution. –  user183037 Sep 24 '11 at 23:34

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