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Are there any tools to optimize .NET applications?

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closed as not constructive by Tim Post Mar 31 '11 at 11:01

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@Disappointment :Nice, but incase If brain fails then ... my answer will help –  Amit Ranjan Mar 31 '11 at 8:24
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@AmRan - your answer aids the human brain in its quest to write good code, regardless. :) –  Grant Thomas Mar 31 '11 at 8:26
    
thanks,these thinks make developers life easy as grasshoper :-) –  Amit Ranjan Mar 31 '11 at 8:30
    
Sorry, this is way too broad. If you can edit this question so that it is much narrower, flag it for moderator attention. –  Tim Post Mar 31 '11 at 11:02
    
What is the value in a "Yes, the brain: write good code." –  Peter Aron Zentai Mar 30 '12 at 10:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Straight answer to your question is NO. there is no such tool that will automatically optimize your application. But yes, there are application called Profilers or Analyzers that will scan your application for loop holes and help you in making it stable. That is from release side, from code side you need some smart Dev Productivity tools.

1. For Profiling
   VS Profiler
    Jet Brains - i again vote for it
    Red Gate
2 For Code Optimization
  Code Rush
  Just Code
  Resharper - i vote for it
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I am looking for some tools to optimize c# code automatically –  ramezani.saleh Mar 31 '11 at 8:37
    
+1 for mentioning the JetBrains profiler. –  Johann Blais Mar 31 '11 at 8:38

Couple of different approaches

You can use ngen to slightly improve performance - from the msdn page

The Native Image Generator (Ngen.exe) is a tool that improves the performance of managed applications. Ngen.exe creates native images, which are files containing compiled processor-specific machine code, and installs them into the native image cache on the local computer. The runtime can use native images from the cache instead using the just-in-time (JIT) compiler to compile the original assembly.

Or you can apply performance measurement to your code and make changes to optimise - see tools such as RedGates ANTS profiler

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You have to watch out with NGEN. The files that it produces are bigger than the MSIL files which means for a cold start they may take longer to load. If your computer has a fast processor and a slow disk then NGENing will make things worse. –  Matthew Steeples Mar 31 '11 at 8:32

As an accompaniment to AmRan's answer, and the rewarding work that goes into the practice of such, there is also a tool named ngen; ngen.exe can perform operations on your assemblies in order to generate a native image:

From MSDN:

The Native Image Generator (Ngen.exe) is a tool that improves the performance of managed applications. Ngen.exe creates native images, which are files containing compiled processor-specific machine code, and installs them into the native image cache on the local computer. The runtime can use native images from the cache instead of using the just-in-time (JIT) compiler to compile the original assembly.

Though, as stated above, this must be processed on the client machine in order to benefit from this.

But by the time you've analysed your problem and determined the best approach, written the code well, profiled the hell out of it and addressed bottlenecks, and further generated a machine specific native image upon installation within a client environment, you should be just about optimised the to hilt - barring room for exceptional circumstances.

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