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I am having a application that is changing some settings of other application (it is a simple C# application that run by double clicking (no setup required)).

After changing the settings I need to restart the other application so that it reflects the changed settings.

So to do, I have to kill the running process and start the process again, But the problem is after killing I am not able to find the process. (Reason is system do not know where the exe file is..)

Is there any way to find out the path of running process or exe, if it is running?

I do not want to give path manually, i.e. if it is running get the path, kill the proccess and start again else .... I will handle later

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8 Answers 8

up vote 47 down vote accepted
 //using System.Diagnostics;

 Process process = GetProcessHowever();  // Process.GetProcesses(); if you dont have.
 string fullPath = process.Modules[0].FileName;

 //fullPath has the path to exe.

There is one catch with this API, if you are running this code in 32 bit application, you'll not be able to access 64-bit application paths, so you'd have to compile and run you app as 64-bit application. (Project Properties -> Build -> Platform Target -> x64)

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10  
@GAPS: I'm sure he means, "get your process instance however you get it here." –  Jeff Mercado Mar 31 '11 at 8:35
2  
It gives problem Access is denied on line string fullPath = process.Modules[0].FileName; Any idea please? –  Sami Mar 4 '13 at 20:14
2  
Any reason for downvote? –  Sanjeevakumar Hiremath Jun 19 '13 at 16:24
2  
Instead of changing Platform Target to x64, I changed Platform Target to Any and unchecked the Prefer 32 bit option –  Prat Oct 1 '13 at 10:04
2  
According to my measurements, calling process.Modules[0] is 50 times slower than calling process.MainModule. –  Luca Cremonesi Oct 23 at 16:14

What you can do is use WMI to get the paths. This will allow you to get the path regardless it's a 32-bit or 64-bit application. Here's an example demonstrating how you can get it:

// include the namespace
using System.Management;

var wmiQueryString = "SELECT ProcessId, ExecutablePath, CommandLine FROM Win32_Process";
using (var searcher = new ManagementObjectSearcher(wmiQueryString))
using (var results = searcher.Get())
{
    var query = from p in Process.GetProcesses()
                join mo in results.Cast<ManagementObject>()
                on p.Id equals (int)(uint)mo["ProcessId"]
                select new
                {
                    Process = p,
                    Path = (string)mo["ExecutablePath"],
                    CommandLine = (string)mo["CommandLine"],
                };
    foreach (var item in query)
    {
        // Do what you want with the Process, Path, and CommandLine
    }
}

Note that you'll have to reference the System.Management.dll assembly and use the System.Management namespace.

For more info on what other information you can grab out of these processes such as the command line used to start the program (CommandLine), see the Win32_Process class and WMI .NET for for more information.

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your answer is awesome, but my current app is small one... I keep this in mind –  PawanS Mar 31 '11 at 9:12
2  
+1 perhaps for this question it's an overkill, but because of the 32/64bit independency, this method came in really handy when I wanted to get 64bit-process information from a running 32bit process. –  adabyron Mar 16 '12 at 13:33
    
Thanks a lot, this code is definitely working !!!. –  Sumant Sep 4 '13 at 9:50
    
Unlike the accepted Answer, this also works in Terminal Server Enviroments. Good job, helped me much! –  M C Feb 20 at 10:41
1  
Note that the Path property set from mo["ExecutablePath"] is null for some processes. –  Sam Dec 8 at 4:01

I guess you already have the process object of the running process (e.g. by GetProcessesByName()). You can then get the executable file name by using

Process p;
string filename = p.MainModule.FileName;
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1  
if not use: var p = Process.GetCurrentProcess(); string filename = p.MainModule.FileName; –  Andreas Jun 28 '12 at 11:42
    
The "A 32 bit processes cannot access modules of a 64 bit process." limitation is unfortunately here too. –  Roland Pihlakas Oct 17 '13 at 12:31

By combining Sanjeevakumar Hiremath's and Jeff Mercado's answers you can actually in a way get around the problem when retrieving the icon from a 64-bit process in a 32-bit process.

using System;
using System.Management;
using System.Diagnostics;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            int processID = 6680;   // Change for the process you would like to use
            Process process = Process.GetProcessById(processID);
            string path = ProcessExecutablePath(process);
        }

        static private string ProcessExecutablePath(Process process)
        {
            try
            {
                return process.MainModule.FileName;
            }
            catch
            {
                string query = "SELECT ExecutablePath, ProcessID FROM Win32_Process";
                ManagementObjectSearcher searcher = new ManagementObjectSearcher(query);

                foreach (ManagementObject item in searcher.Get())
                {
                    object id = item["ProcessID"];
                    object path = item["ExecutablePath"];

                    if (path != null && id.ToString() == process.Id.ToString())
                    {
                        return path.ToString();
                    }
                }
            }

            return "";
        }
    }
}

This may be a bit slow and doesn't work on every process which lacks a "valid" icon.

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The Process class has a member StartInfo that you should check out:

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1  
This only applies to local processes that were started using Process.Start(), not existing processes. –  Jeff Mercado Mar 31 '11 at 9:14
private void Test_Click(object sender, System.EventArgs e){
   string path;
   path = System.IO.Path.GetDirectoryName( 
      System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetName().CodeBase );
    Console.WriiteLine( path );  
}
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for which exe, this code is for –  PawanS Mar 31 '11 at 8:44
    
@GAPS: this is for Executing Assembly (the which is currently running ) –  Sonal Satpute Jul 18 '12 at 5:55

I got to this thread while looking for the current directory of an executing process. In .net 1.1 Microsoft introduced:

Directory.GetCurrentDirectory();

Seems to work well (but doesn't return the name of the process itself).

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That'll only return the directory the executable is located in under some circumstances. You can, for instance, open a command line, change to any random directory, and run the executable by specifying a full path to it; GetCurrentDirectory() will return the directory you executed from rather than the executable's directory. From link: "The current directory is distinct from the original directory, which is the one from which the process was started." –  Dave Ruske Mar 12 at 21:50

Try:

using System.Diagnostics;

ProcessModuleCollection modules = Process.GetCurrentProcess().Modules;
string processpathfilename;
string processmodulename;
if (modules.Count > 0) {
    processpathfilename = modules[0].FileName;
    processmodulename= modules[0].ModuleName;
} else {
    throw new ExecutionEngineException("Something critical occurred with the running process.");
}
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