Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wanted a timer with the following properties:

  1. No matter how many times start is called, only one call back thread is ever running

  2. The time spent in the call back function was ignored with regards to the interval. E.g if the interval is 100ms and the call back takes 4000ms to execute, the callback is called at 100ms, 4100ms etc.

I couldn't see anything available so wrote the following code. Is there a better way to do this?

/**
 * Will ensure that only one thread is ever in the callback
 */
public class SingleThreadedTimer : Timer
{
    protected static readonly object InstanceLock = new object();

    //used to check whether timer has been disposed while in call back
    protected bool running = false;

    virtual new public void Start()
    {
        lock (InstanceLock)
        {
            this.AutoReset = false;
            this.Elapsed -= new ElapsedEventHandler(SingleThreadedTimer_Elapsed);
            this.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(SingleThreadedTimer_Elapsed);
            this.running = true;
            base.Start();
        }

    }

    virtual public void SingleThreadedTimer_Elapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        lock (InstanceLock)
        {
            DoSomethingCool();

            //check if stopped while we were waiting for the lock, we don't want to restart if this is the case..
            if (running)
            {
                this.Start();
            }
        }
    }

    virtual new public void Stop()
    {
        lock (InstanceLock)
        {
            running = false;
            base.Stop();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's a quick example I just knocked up;

using System.Threading;
//...
public class TimerExample
{
    private System.Threading.Timer m_objTimer;
    private bool m_blnStarted;
    private readonly int m_intTickMs = 1000;
    private object m_objLockObject = new object();

    public TimerExample()
    {
        //Create your timer object, but don't start anything yet
        m_objTimer = new System.Threading.Timer(callback, m_objTimer, Timeout.Infinite, Timeout.Infinite);
    }

    public void Start()
    {
        if (!m_blnStarted)
        {
            lock (m_objLockObject)
            {
                if (!m_blnStarted) //double check after lock to be thread safe
                {
                    m_blnStarted = true;

                    //Make it start in 'm_intTickMs' milliseconds, 
                    //but don't auto callback when it's done (Timeout.Infinite)
                    m_objTimer.Change(m_intTickMs, Timeout.Infinite);
                }
            }
        }
    }

    public void Stop()
    {
        lock (m_objLockObject)
        {
            m_blnStarted = false;
        }
    }

    private void callback(object state)
    {
        System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("callback invoked");

        //TODO: your code here
        Thread.Sleep(4000);

        //When your code has finished running, wait 'm_intTickMs' milliseconds
        //and call the callback method again, 
        //but don't auto callback (Timeout.Infinite)
        m_objTimer.Change(m_intTickMs, Timeout.Infinite);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Good answer and thanks. I was wandering what would would happen if two threads called the Start routine simultaneously? –  richard druce Mar 31 '11 at 13:28
    
@Richard Fair point, the answer would reliably work only for single a threaded application. I've edited my answer to give an idea of where locking would come into play. You could always lock(this) instead if you prefer. –  firefox1986 Mar 31 '11 at 13:48
    
@Richard: To ensure only one thread will be calling the start routine at a given time you can use Mutex. Further details could be found here msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173179.aspx –  MUS Mar 31 '11 at 13:51

Look at the [ThreadStatic] attribute and the .Net 4.0 ThreadLocal generic type. This will probably quickly give you a way to code this without messing with thread locking etc.

You could have a stack inside your time class, and you could implement a Monitor() method that returns a IDisposable, so you can use the timer like so:

using (_threadTimer.Monitor())
{
     // do stuff
}

Have the timer-monitor pop the the interval timestamp off the stack during Dispose().

Manually coding all the locking and thread recognition is an option as has been mentioned. However, locking will influence the time used, most likely more than having to initialize an instance per thread using ThreadLocal

If you're interested, I might knock up an example later

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.