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I have a nested loop "structure" in my code. Sometimes, I get the below message.

Collection was modified; enumeration operation may not execute.

I have a collection I am looping through, like below. Coll is a List<string>

foreach (string[] s1 in obj.Coll
{
    foreach (string s in s1) { }
}

For each string in the array, I need to work with it (read as read the value, not write). All I do with it is get directories (this value is a path) and split this string into an array.

How can this be resolved?

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1  
"Sometimes" is a dead giveaway of what's happening: another thread modifies the collection. –  Jon Mar 31 '11 at 9:24
    
possible duplicate of C# Collection was modified; enumeration operation may not execute –  nawfal Jun 5 '13 at 17:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can try:

foreach (string[] s1 in obj.Coll.ToArray())
{

That will take a copy before starting iteration!

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1  
Note that this will only work if the collection is not changed by another thread because the ToArray() is not thread-safe. –  mgronber Mar 31 '11 at 13:11
    
I've used it in heavy-load multithreaded applications for years with not a single error or problem, are you certain? –  Kieren Johnstone Mar 31 '11 at 15:49
    
I edited my answer to demonstrate the problem. –  mgronber Mar 31 '11 at 16:51
    
Well, you're right. And it looks like I even found that out for myself and forgot - I have locks and events around that code :) –  Kieren Johnstone Apr 1 '11 at 7:45

The obj.Coll is changed while you are enumerating it. If it is not changed by the current thread, it may be changed by some other thread. If the collection is changed by the current thread, there are basically two ways to solve the problem: You can create a copy of the collection and enumerate the copy or you can postpone the changes until you have enumerated the collection.

However, if the collection is changed by another thread, you should access the collection in a thread-safe manner (not just here but everywhere).

EDIT for Kieren Johnstone:

I wrote a short code to demonstrate that List<T>.ToArray() is not thread-safe.

var list = new List<int>();

Task.Factory.StartNew(() => {
    for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; ++i) {
        list.Clear();

        // Add values from 1 to 9
        for (int j = 1; j < 10; ++j) {
            list.Add(j);
        }
    }

    Console.WriteLine("Thread Exit: list.Add()");
});

Task.Factory.StartNew(() => {
    for (int i = 0; i < 100; ++i) {
        var array = list.ToArray();
        if (array.Length > 0) {
            Console.WriteLine("ToArray(): {0}", string.Join(", ", array));
        }
    }

    Console.WriteLine("Thread Exit: list.ToArray()");
});

And below is a snippet of the output. I guess that it proves my claim. The snippet contains 15 lines and nine of them contain bad data.

ToArray(): 1, 2, 3, 4
ToArray(): 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 0, 0, 0, 0
ToArray(): 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 0, 0
ToArray(): 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0
ToArray(): 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 0, 0, 0, 0
ToArray(): 0, 0, 0, 4, 5, 6, 7
ToArray(): 1, 2, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0
ToArray(): 1, 2, 3
ToArray(): 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0
ToArray(): 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0
ToArray(): 1, 2
ToArray(): 1, 2, 3
ToArray(): 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0
ToArray(): 1, 2, 3, 4
ToArray(): 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

There would be more variations if we had used list.Insert(0, j) instead of list.Add(j).

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