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This doesn't work:

interface TestInterface
{
    public function testMethod();
}

interface TestInterface2
{
    public function testMethod();
}

class TestClass implements TestInterface, TestInterface2
{

}

Gives me the error:

Fatal error: Can't inherit abstract function TestInterface2::testMethod() (previously declared abstract in TestInterface).

Is that correct? Why is this not allowed? Doesn't make sense to me.

This also happens with abstract functions, for example if you implement an interface and then inherit from a class that has an abstract function of the same name.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

It makes no sense to implement two interfaces containing methods with the same signatures.

The compiler cannot know if the methods actually have the same purpose - if not, it would mean that at least one of the interfaces cannot be implemented by your class.

Example:

interface IProgram { function execute($what); /* executes the given program */ }
interface ISQLQuery { function execute($what); /* executes the given sql query */ }

class PureAwesomeness implements IProgram, ISQLQuery {
    public function execute($what) { /* execute something.. but what?! */ }
}

So as you see, it's impossible to implement the method for both interfaces - and it'd also be impossible to call the method which actually implements the method from a given interface.

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2  
But the whole point of interfaces is that they don't have implementation though. What if you want to make your class able to be passed to a function that specifies one interface for a parameter and another one which specifies another interface but both have one method in common? A method name like "getName()" is not going to have a different purpose on a different interface. –  Gnuffo1 Mar 31 '11 at 9:20
3  
In that case you should create a new interface, e.g. INamed which just contains the getName() method. –  ThiefMaster Mar 31 '11 at 9:24
1  
They don't have implementation, but they do have semantics, at least implicitly. While you could implement a method in an interface to have an entirely different meaning in different classes which use it, this would be contrary to the spirit of interfaces. However, if you implement two different interfaces, there is no guarantee that their specifiers knew anything of each other, and hence that the similarly-named methods had similar semantics. I guess you could make each interface extend a common interface that contained the common method. –  Colin Fine Mar 31 '11 at 9:27
    
Implementing interfaces with the same signatures works perfectly fine for me using PHP 5.3.10 on Windows. It does not work on my PHP 5.3.3 Linux setup; There, I get the same error as the original poster. –  meddlingwithfire Feb 28 '12 at 18:54

The PHP manual says explicitly:

A class cannot implement two interfaces that share function names, since it would cause ambiguity.

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I don't understand where the ambiguity could be, since there are no implementations (that's the whole point of the Interface). I can see why you wouldn't want the same method with different signatures, but, with the same signature, shouldn't this be left for the concrete implementation to deal with? Isn't that the way, for instance, Java works? –  Muc Dec 17 '12 at 15:49
    
I think there is an argument for what you say: it is a decision the language designers take how far to protect you from yourself. There is no intrinsic ambiguity, but if the interfaces have functions with the same signature, the semantics they require from the functions might match, or they might be entirely different. –  Colin Fine Dec 18 '12 at 15:35

It appears that current PHP versions actually can do this. I've tracked the change in behavior down to this commit:

https://github.com/php/php-src/commit/31ef559712dae57046b6377f07634ad57f9d88cf#Zend/zend_compile.c

So as of php-5.3.9 the documented behavior appears to have changed.

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interface BaseInterface
{
    public function testMethod();
}

interface TestInterface extends BaseInterface
{
}

interface TestInterface2 extends BaseInterface
{
}

class TestClass implements TestInterface, TestInterface2
{
    public function testMethod()
    {
    }
}
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This is not allowed, because PHP cannot be sure which interface has the method you want. In your case they are identical, but imagine if they had different parameters.

You should reconsider your application design.

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