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When should I use malloc in C and when don't I?

Hi I'm new to C language and found that malloc. When should I use it ? In my job, some say you have to use malloc in this case but other say you don't need to use it in this case. So my question is When should I use malloc ? . It may be a stupid question for you but for a programmer who is new to C, it's confusing !

Thanks.

Kevin

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marked as duplicate by Andrew Aylett, Björn Pollex, Armen Tsirunyan, Lightness Races in Orbit, Let_Me_Be Mar 31 '11 at 9:39

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@kevin: When you are asking a C question, please don't tag it C++. –  Björn Pollex Mar 31 '11 at 9:34
    
@space >> not the same ? –  kevin Mar 31 '11 at 9:35
    
Is this a C question or a C++ question? Make up your mind. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 31 '11 at 9:35
    
@kevin: No; they are quite different, related but separate languages. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 31 '11 at 9:36
    
oh !! sorry , I don't know it !! –  kevin Mar 31 '11 at 9:36

3 Answers 3

With malloc() you can allocate memory "on-the-fly". This is useful if you don't know beforehand how much memory you need for something.

If you do know, you can make a static allocation like

int my_table[10]; // Allocates a table of ten ints.

If you however don't know how many ints you need to store, you would do

int *my_table;
// During execution you somehow find out the number and store to the "count" variable
my_table = (int*) malloc(sizeof(int)*count);
// Then you would use the table and after you don't need it anymore you say
free(my_table);
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>> Thank you !!! –  kevin Mar 31 '11 at 9:35
    
I know this is old, but out of curiosity couldn't you just do: int my_table[count]; ? If so then why use malloc for this example? –  John Powers Jul 26 at 6:18

one Primary usage is, when you are working on a list of items and size of the list is unknown to you.

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>> Thanks –  kevin Mar 31 '11 at 9:33

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