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I would like to iterate over a java List using the old fashion for(int i...) loop, since for a given i and loop iteration, I want to access several elements relative to i. Then I can't use for(Object o: objects) neither the list iterator.

How can I ensure that no other code can access the list while I'm executing it?

I tried

synchronized(path.getPoints()){
    for (int i = 0; i < path.getPoints().size(); i++){
        ...
    }
}

where path is the object holding the list, and also

synchronized(path){
    for (int i = 0; i < path.getPoints().size(); i++){
        ...
    }
}

and also

synchronized(this){
    for (int i = 0; i < path.getPoints().size(); i++){
        ...
    }
}

where "this" is the renderer that would like to render the path quitely without synchronization issue.

Thanks in advance,

Martin

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The synchronization code you've posted should work in all three cases. Are you sure you don't have some other thread accessing the path outside of a synchronization guard? –  templatetypedef Mar 31 '11 at 9:44
    
What makes you think another thread is accessing the list? –  murdoch Mar 31 '11 at 9:47
    
@murdoch: I have one editor thread running in the background, and one UI thread, running continuously and rendering the list of points. @template: I was only synchronizing one of these two thread instead of both –  Martin Apr 1 '11 at 10:31

6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

How can I ensure that no other code can access the list while I'm executing it?

By making sure that all other code also synchronizes on the same object. synchronized(path.getPoints()) is the best choice. It might be a good idea for getPoints() to return the list wrapped via Collections.synchronizedList() - then you don't need to synchronize simple get() or add() calls explicitly, but you still need the synchronization for the iteration.

Complicated? Yeah. That's why shared-memory multithreaded programming is considered very difficult.

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I think in this particular question, using synchronizedList is useless because you will have to synchronize all get, add, and iteration using a same synchronization object. See my answer... –  nanda Mar 31 '11 at 10:04
    
@nanda: actually, this scenario is exactly described as an example for correct usage in the API doc for synchronizedList(). Apparently, the wrapper uses itself for synchronization in order to allow external synchronization to work as well. –  Michael Borgwardt Mar 31 '11 at 10:12
    
you are right... –  nanda Mar 31 '11 at 10:16
    
I missed the point of using the synchronized keyword for each caller :/ After changing that I had to add your suggested Collections.synchronizedList(new ArrayList<Point2D>) to have the synchronization working. Thank you so much :) Will that be equivalent to using Vector? –  Martin Apr 1 '11 at 10:39
    
@Martin: mostly yes. That and the interface of ArrayList is cleaner (not polluted with legacy methods) and its doubling reallocation strategy makes it faster if it grows very large from the default size. –  Michael Borgwardt Apr 1 '11 at 14:32

You can avoid synchronization completely by using a copy on write approach. It has an associated cost but that may be acceptable to you: http://download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/CopyOnWriteArrayList.html

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You could make path.getPoints() synchronized and return a copy of the points list (or maybe an array). Then you don't need to sync while iterating over it. If points is private you can easily make sure that all the methods in Path that access it are also synchronized.

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"synchronized (this)" (where "this" is your renderer) makes sure that no other thread can run the same renderer at the same time; other threads can, however, access the list and the "path" object.

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Your best go at it would probably be to ensure anything that is using the collection (path.getPoints()) for writing is doing so in a synchronized block (on that same collection), so that a consumer (e.g. read-only) of that collection that wants to use an enumerator on it can do so safely by also using a synchronized block on the collection.

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I would suggest you write this as.

List<Point> points = path.getPoints()
synchronized(points){
    for (Point point: points){
        ...
    }
}

This ensure getPoints() doesn't return something different and simplifies the code IMHO.

I would also use @Michaels suggestion of either synchronizing every time the getPoints() is accessed or make it a Collectons.synchronizedList() or a thread safe list like CopyOnWriteArrayList()

Note: if you use a thread safe list, you may not need to synchronize it.

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