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I am working on a project where I am reading memory locations and need to output their hex value in ASCII.

The language gives me a 16 bit word length, so I have a need to divide to grab a nibble at a time to convert to hex. Unfortunately, the language only offers and, or, not, and add for mathematical/logical functions.

I've figured I can create the desired effect by left shifting and testing for a negative flag to add a 1 to the end after shifting, but I'm figuring there has to be a better method for doing this.

Any insight would be appreciated.

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4 Answers 4

Using AND you can set all bits to zero except the last significant nibble:

0101010111010101
0000000000001111 AND
----------------
0000000000000101

By shifting the whole thing right, you can read the next nibble:

0101010111010101 SHR 4
----------------
    010101011101
0000000000001111 AND
----------------
0000000000001101

Is that of any use to you?

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Already applying masking to clear insignificant bits. The trouble I'm running into is that there is no right shift operation in the language. Have to figure out how to create that operation by signed integer addition on a 16 bit value. What I'm doing at the moment is masking the value, checking for a 1 on bit 15, and if it is present, left shifting and adding 1, else left shift. It seems really inefficient and I have to build a subroutine for each nibble in this method. –  DivinusVox Mar 31 '11 at 11:22
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Do you have an add with carry? Instead of the test for negative add the bit off the end and add a zero with carry to put it back on the right. doesnt really save much. So far I cant think of another solution, shift left, test a bit, if set add 1 to something and shift that something:

uint a,b,i;

b=0;
for(i=0;i<4;i++)
{
   b=b+b;
   if(a&0x8000) b+=1;
   a=a+a;
}

If uint above was 16 bits then the above would give you a right shift of 12. a would be destroyed in the process to create b, as written.

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There is no add with a carry. =/ –  DivinusVox Apr 1 '11 at 0:21
    
I think you are limited to a bunch of lefts make a right. –  dwelch Apr 1 '11 at 2:55
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You can try it in reverse: instead of trying to implement the right shift, you can use brute force. Here is an example for highest nibble:

unsigned rez, tmp;
for (rez = 0, tmp = some_word & 0x0FFF; tmp != some_word; rez++, tmp += 0x1000);
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

So the original method I used worked. I also came up with another, incase anyone ever has this problem again.

I built a subroutine that evaluates 4 bits at a time and creates a number based on the evaluation, for some C style pseudo code it looks like this:

16bitSignedInt bin; //binary being analyzed
int value; //number being built

for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++) // while 0-3, for each nibble of the 16 bits
{
   if (bin.bit15 = 1)
      value += 8; // dominate bit in nibble

   bin <<= 1; // left shift 1

   if (bin.bit15 = 1)
      value += 4; // 2nd bit in nibble

   bin <<= 1; // left shift 1

   if (bin.bit15 = 1)
      value += 2; // 3rd bit in nibble

   bin <<= 1; // left shift 1

   if (bin.bit15 = 1)
      value += 1; // last bit in nibble

   bin <<= 1; // left shift 1

   //do work with value
}

Crude, but effective.

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