Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

A very simple & quick question on Java libraries: is there a ready-made class that implements a Queue with a fixed maximum size - i.e. it always allows addition of elements, but it will silently remove head elements to accomodate space for newly added elements.

Of course, it's trivial to implement it manually:

import java.util.LinkedList;

public class LimitedQueue<E> extends LinkedList<E> {
    private int limit;

    public LimitedQueue(int limit) {
        this.limit = limit;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean add(E o) {
        super.add(o);
        while (size() > limit) { super.remove(); }
        return true;
    }
}

As far as I see, there's no standard implementation in Java stdlibs, but may be there's one in Apache Commons or something like that?

share|improve this question
1  
Related stackoverflow.com/questions/590069/… –  andersoj Mar 31 '11 at 11:47
    
How funny: I just implemented this yesterday. Will post. –  Kevin Bourrillion Mar 31 '11 at 14:21
5  
@Kevin: You're such a tease. –  Mark Peters Apr 12 '11 at 14:58
2  
Personnaly I would not introduce another library if this would the only use of this library... –  Nicolas Bousquet Apr 14 '11 at 16:31
1  
@Override public boolean add(PropagationTask t) { boolean added = super.add(t); while (added && size() > limit) { super.remove(); } return added; } –  RenaudBlue Jan 14 '13 at 16:24
add comment

8 Answers

up vote 39 down vote accepted
+50

Apache commons collections 4 has a CircularFifoQueue which is what you are looking for. Quoting the javadoc:

CircularFifoQueue is a first-in first-out queue with a fixed size that replaces its oldest element if full.

If you are using an older version of the Apache commons collections (3.x), you can use the CircularFifoBuffer which is basically the same thing without generics.

Update: updated answer following release of commons collections version 4

share|improve this answer
1  
That's a good candidate, but, alas, it doesn't use generics :( –  GreyCat Apr 15 '11 at 10:49
    
Thanks! Looks that's the most viable alternative for now :) –  GreyCat Apr 18 '11 at 20:52
    
See this other answer for link to EvictingQueue added to Google Guava version 15 around 2013-10. –  Basil Bourque Feb 11 at 10:10
add comment

Guava now has an EvictingQueue -- "A non-blocking queue which automatically evicts elements from the head of the queue when attempting to add new elements onto the queue and it is full."

http://docs.guava-libraries.googlecode.com/git/javadoc/com/google/common/collect/EvictingQueue.html

share|improve this answer
    
Good point, thanks! –  GreyCat Mar 2 '13 at 6:01
    
This should be interesting to use once it comes out officially. –  Asaf Mar 18 '13 at 0:18
    
Here is the source: code.google.com/p/guava-libraries/source/browse/guava/src/com/… - it looks like it would be easy to copy and compile with current releases of Guava –  Tom Carchrae Jun 21 '13 at 7:31
    
this one removes elements from head and not the last element - question was to hold last N elements –  Maciej Miklas Jan 23 at 8:14
    
Update: This class was officially released with Google Guava in version 15, around 2013-10. –  Basil Bourque Feb 11 at 10:11
add comment

Use composition not extends (yes I mean extends, as in a reference to the extends keyword in java and yes this is inheritance). Composition is superier because it completely shields your implementation, allowing you to change the implementation without impacting the users of your class.

I recommend trying something like this (I'm typing directly into this window, so buyer beware of syntax errors):

public LimitedSizeQueue implements Queue
{
  private int maxSize;
  private LinkedList storageArea;

  public LimitedSizeQueue(final int maxSize)
  {
    this.maxSize = maxSize;
    storageArea = new LinkedList();
  }

  public boolean offer(ElementType element)
  {
    if (storageArea.size() < maxSize)
    {
      storageArea.addFirst(element);
    }
    else
    {
      ... remove last element;
      storageArea.addFirst(element);
    }
  }

  ... the rest of this class

A better option (based on the answer by Asaf) might be to wrap the Apache Collections CircularFifoBuffer with a generic class. For example:

public LimitedSizeQueue<ElementType> implements Queue<ElementType>
{
    private int maxSize;
    private CircularFifoBuffer storageArea;

    public LimitedSizeQueue(final int maxSize)
    {
        if (maxSize > 0)
        {
            this.maxSize = maxSize;
            storateArea = new CircularFifoBuffer(maxSize);
        }
        else
        {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("blah blah blah");
        }
    }

    ... implement the Queue interface using the CircularFifoBuffer class
}
share|improve this answer
2  
+1 if you explain why composition is a better choice (other than "prefer composition over inheritance) ... and there is a very good reason –  kdgregory Apr 14 '11 at 18:29
    
Composition is a poor choice for my task here: it means at least twice the number of objects => at least twice more often garbage collection. I use large quantities (tens of millions) of these limited-size queues, like that: Map<Long, LimitedSizeQueue<String>>. –  GreyCat Apr 15 '11 at 10:52
    
@GreyCat - I take it you haven't looked at how LinkedList is implemented, then. The extra object created as a wrapper around the list will be pretty minor, even with "tens of millions" of instances. –  kdgregory Apr 15 '11 at 13:22
    
I was going for "reduces the size of the interface," but "shields the implementation" is pretty much the same thing. Either answers Mark Peter's complaints about the OP's approach. –  kdgregory Apr 16 '11 at 13:34
add comment

The only thing I know that has limited space is the BlockingQueue interface (which is e.g. implemented by the ArrayBlockingQueue class) - but they do not remove the first element if filled, but instead block the put operation until space is free (removed by other thread).

To my knowledge your trivial implementation is the easiest way to get such an behaviour.

share|improve this answer
    
This has already been suggested and deleted. –  Mark Peters Apr 12 '11 at 15:06
    
I've already browsed through Java stdlib classes, and, sadly, BlockingQueue is not an answer. I've thought of other common libraries, such as Apache Commons, Eclipse's libraries, Spring's, Google's additions, etc? –  GreyCat Apr 12 '11 at 15:22
add comment

You can use a MinMaxPriorityQueue from Google Guava, from the javadoc:

A min-max priority queue can be configured with a maximum size. If so, each time the size of the queue exceeds that value, the queue automatically removes its greatest element according to its comparator (which might be the element that was just added). This is different from conventional bounded queues, which either block or reject new elements when full.

share|improve this answer
2  
Do you understand what a priority queue is, and how it differs from the OP's example? –  kdgregory Apr 12 '11 at 15:52
1  
@kdgregory: It can be used with some extra work. Just keep an long cursor = Long.MAX_VALUE, use it as the priority value and decrement it each time you add to the queue. In practice that will almost certainly be sufficient. –  Mark Peters Apr 12 '11 at 16:57
1  
@Mark Peters - I just don't know what to say. Sure, you can make a priority queue behave like a fifo queue. You could also make a Map behave like a List. But both ideas show a complete incomprehension of algorithms and software design. –  kdgregory Apr 12 '11 at 17:56
2  
@jtahlborn: Clearly not (code golf), but even if they were, good is not a black and white criterion. For a certain project, good might mean "most efficient", for another it might mean "easiest to maintain" and for yet another, it might mean "least amount of code with existing libraries". All that is irrelevant since I never said this was a good answer. I just said it can be a solution without too much effort. Turning a MinMaxPriorityQueue into what the OP wants is more trivial than modifying a LinkedList (the OP's code doesn't even come close). –  Mark Peters Apr 14 '11 at 17:41
3  
Maybe you guys are examining my choice of words "in practice that will almost certainly be sufficient". I didn't mean that this solution would almost certainly be sufficient for the OP's problem or in general. I was referring to the choice of a descending long as a cursor type within my own suggestion, saying that it would be sufficiently wide in practice even though theoretically you could add more than 2^64 objects to this queue at which point the solution would break down. –  Mark Peters Apr 14 '11 at 20:12
show 5 more comments

An LRUMap is another possibility, also from Apache Commons.

http://commons.apache.org/collections/apidocs/org/apache/commons/collections/map/LRUMap.html

share|improve this answer
    
I don't really understand how to adapt LRUMap to act as a queue and I guess it would be rather hard to use even if it's possible. –  GreyCat Aug 23 '11 at 1:59
add comment

I like @FractalizeR solution. But I would in addition keep and return the value from super.add(o)!

public class LimitedQueue<E> extends LinkedList<E> {

    private int limit;

    public LimitedQueue(int limit) {
        this.limit = limit;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean add(E o) {
        boolean added = super.add(o);
        while (added && size() > limit) {
           super.remove();
        }
        return added;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
As far as I can see, FractalizeR hasn't provided any solution, only edited the question. "Solution" within the question is not a solution, because the question was about using some class in standard or semi-standard library, not rolling your own. –  GreyCat Jan 17 '13 at 5:38
add comment
    public class ArrayLimitedQueue<E> extends ArrayDeque<E> {

    private int limit;

    public ArrayLimitedQueue(int limit) {
        super(limit + 1);
        this.limit = limit;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean add(E o) {
        boolean added = super.add(o);
        while (added && size() > limit) {
            super.remove();
        }
        return added;
    }

    @Override
    public void addLast(E e) {
        super.addLast(e);
        while (size() > limit) {
            super.removeLast();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public boolean offerLast(E e) {
        boolean added = super.offerLast(e);
        while (added && size() > limit) {
            super.pollLast();
        }
        return added;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
The question was about classes in popular collection class libraries, not rolling one's own - minimalistic homebrew "solution" was already provided in question. –  GreyCat Aug 17 '13 at 19:18
    
that does not matter google find this page also on another queries =) –  user590444 Aug 17 '13 at 19:37
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.