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I'd like to be able to access sections of a short string as part of a record

Something like

TMyRecord = record
    case Boolean of
        True: 
        (
            EntireString: String[20];
        );
        False
        (
            StringStart: String[8];
            StringMiddle: String[4];
            StringEnd: String[8];
        );
end;

Is this possible or would I have to declare each char individually

TMyRecord = record
    private
        Chars: Array[1..20] of Char;
        Function GetStringStart:String;
        Procedure SetStringStart(Value: String);       
    public
        Property StringStart: String read GetStringStart write SetStringStart; // Can I have properties on a record?
end;

Function GetStringStart: String;
begin
    Result := Chars[1] + Char[2]....;
end;

Procedure SetStringStart(Value: String);   
begin
    for i := 1 to 8 do
    begin
        Chars[i] := Value[i];
    end;
end; 

Is this possible / worth the effort?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

A Delphi short string contains more than just the string contents. The initial byte in the data structure contains the length of the string. This is why short strings are limited to 255 characters.

So, you can't use short strings in your variant array the way you propose.

What you could do is adapt your second approach based on getter and setter methods to be a bit more readable.

For example:

function TMyRecord.GetStringStart: string;
begin
  SetString(Result, @Chars[1], 8);
end;

You might consider using a string rather than a char array, but it's a little hard to be 100% sure of that advice without knowing exactly what your underlying problem is.

As a final thought, why not turn the problem around? Store 3 strings: StartString, MiddleString and EndString. Then have a property backed with a getter and setter called EntireString. When you read EntireString it pieces it together from the 3 individual parts, and when you write to it it pulls the individual parts out. I suspect it would be easier that way around.

share|improve this answer
    
String will work fine, I just want to be read/write to defined sections of the string where it's possible that those sections overlap. Thinking about it I'll probably want an array/list of these records. –  James Barrass Mar 31 '11 at 12:02
    
IMHO you could use the SetString() function instead of SetLength+Move - it's faster because it won't reallocate any existing result string as SetLength() does. –  Arnaud Bouchez Mar 31 '11 at 12:08
    
@A.Bouchez Thanks. SetString is better, but I prefer it because it better encapsulated rather than the performance difference! For some reason SetString isn't something I routinely use. –  David Heffernan Mar 31 '11 at 12:15
    
Another good reason of using SetString() instead of Move() is that the first expect either a PAnsiChar either a PWideChar as source buffer, depending on the exact string type, whereas Move() is type-less, and won't notify you if you're pointing the wrong character size as source. –  Arnaud Bouchez Mar 31 '11 at 12:20
    
That final thought is looking like the way I'll go. –  James Barrass Mar 31 '11 at 12:27

Your first sample doesn't consider the length byte. The memory layout looks like this:

case True:
L12345678901234567890
^....................

case False:
L12345678L1234L12345678
^........^....^........

(L = length byte).

Depending on your requirements (e.g.: Are the partial strings always 8, 4 and 8 Chars?) I'd try storing the partial strings and make EntireString the property, using System.Copy, StrUtils.LeftStr etc.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually they are 2,3,3,2,8 and 3 and map to 2 strings of 8 and 13 with the total length begin 21, but I thought i'd simplify the example. –  James Barrass Mar 31 '11 at 11:49
    
@JamesB: I meant: Are the strings always fully used? I.e. does EntireString or StringStart vary in length? –  Uli Gerhardt Mar 31 '11 at 12:06
1  
+1 because the problem is the layout of shortstring. –  Arnaud Bouchez Mar 31 '11 at 12:09
    
yes they are fully used and always the same length. –  James Barrass Mar 31 '11 at 12:12
    
@JamesB: Then I would use the array solution. But be sure to use SetString (or similar) as @A.Bouchez advised. –  Uli Gerhardt Mar 31 '11 at 12:18

ShortString has an implied length, so your first example will map the length parts of the substrings on top of the main string.

Your second sample is the way to start, with these notes:

  • properties on records are possible
  • you should think of the length of each sub-string (or is it always a fixed array of 20 characters?)

Edit

It totally depend on the reason you want this, and mixing character arrays and strings will get you into trouble because strings can be shorter than the array length.

Small example:

program VariantRecordsWithCharactersAndStrings;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

uses
  SysUtils,
  Math;

const
  Size20 = 20;
  Size8 = 8;
  Size4 = 4;
type
  TChar20 = array[0..Size20-1] of Char;
  TChar8 = array[0..Size8-1] of Char;
  TChar4 = array[0..Size4-1] of Char;
  TMyRecord = record
    class var FillCharValue: Byte;
    function GetEntireString: string;
    function GetStringStart: string;
    function GetStringMiddle: string;
    function GetStringEnd: string;
    procedure SetEntireString(const Value: string);
    procedure SetStringStart(const Value: string);
    procedure SetStringMiddle(const Value: string);
    procedure SetStringEnd(const Value: string);
    property EntireString: string read GetEntireString write SetEntireString;
    property StringStart: string read GetStringStart write SetStringStart;
    property StringMiddle: string read GetStringMiddle write SetStringMiddle;
    property StringEnd: string read GetStringEnd write SetStringEnd;
    procedure SetCharArray(const CharArrayPointer: PChar; const CharArraySize: Integer; const Value: string);
    case Boolean of
      True:
      (
          CharFull: TChar20;
      );
      False:
      (
          CharStart: TChar8;
          CharMiddle: TChar4;
          CharEnd: TChar8;
      );
  end;

function TMyRecord.GetEntireString: string;
begin
  Result := CharFull;
end;

function TMyRecord.GetStringStart: string;
begin
  Result := CharStart;
end;

function TMyRecord.GetStringMiddle: string;
begin
  Result := CharMiddle;
end;

function TMyRecord.GetStringEnd: string;
begin
  Result := CharEnd;
end;

procedure TMyRecord.SetEntireString(const Value: string);
begin
  SetCharArray(CharFull, SizeOf(CharFull), Value);
end;

procedure TMyRecord.SetCharArray(const CharArrayPointer: PChar; const CharArraySize: Integer; const Value: string);
begin
  FillChar(CharArrayPointer^, CharArraySize, FillCharValue);
  Move(Value[1], CharArrayPointer^, Min(CharArraySize, SizeOf(Char)*Length(Value)));
end;

procedure TMyRecord.SetStringStart(const Value: string);
begin
  SetCharArray(CharStart, SizeOf(CharStart), Value);
end;

procedure TMyRecord.SetStringMiddle(const Value: string);
begin
  SetCharArray(CharMiddle, SizeOf(CharMiddle), Value);
end;

procedure TMyRecord.SetStringEnd(const Value: string);
begin
  SetCharArray(CharEnd, SizeOf(CharEnd), Value);
end;

var
  MyRecord: TMyRecord;

procedure Dump();
begin
  Writeln(MyRecord.EntireString);
  Writeln(MyRecord.StringStart);
  Writeln(MyRecord.StringMiddle);
  Writeln(MyRecord.StringEnd);
end;

procedure TestWithFillCharValue(const FillCharValue: Byte);
begin
  Writeln('Testing with FillCharValue ', FillCharValue);
  TMyRecord.FillCharValue := FillCharValue;
  MyRecord.EntireString := '123456789001234567890';
  Dump();
  MyRecord.StringStart := 'AAA';
  MyRecord.StringMiddle := 'BBB';
  MyRecord.StringEnd := 'CCC';
  Dump();
end;

begin
  try
    TestWithFillCharValue(0); // this will truncated all the sub arrays when you pass strings that are too short
    TestWithFillCharValue(20); // when using Unicode, this fails even more horribly
    Write('Press <Enter>');
    Readln;
  except
    on E: Exception do
      Writeln(E.ClassName, ': ', E.Message);
  end;
end.

This class does more or less what you want:

  • it has overlapping data structures
  • when you assign the arrays: no problem
  • when you assign the strings: be aware when strings get to short
share|improve this answer
    
always a fixed length –  James Barrass Mar 31 '11 at 11:53
    
then you should not use strings, but arrays of Char. –  Jeroen Wiert Pluimers Mar 31 '11 at 12:03
    
I'd need to read/write the sections as strings? –  James Barrass Mar 31 '11 at 12:05
    
@JamesB: See my edit. Why do you want this? Explain that in your question, and we can help you better. –  Jeroen Wiert Pluimers Mar 31 '11 at 14:51
    
That record does pretty much exactly what I want. I want this because I'm working with some information stored in a string, for rendering and working with the information it's pretty much always in it's component parts, but for storage in a DB or passing between areas using it then it needs to be the whole string. –  James Barrass Mar 31 '11 at 15:54

As other stated, it won't work, because the variant-sized record will add some lengths for StringStart/StringMiddle/StringEnd in the middle of the EntireString type.

You are confusing the *char type of C with the pascal shortstring type. There is an hidden character at position [0] which is the shortstring length.

You could use regular string type, then split in on purpose:

procedure StringSplit(const EntireString: string; out StringStart, StringMiddle, StringEnd: string);
begin
  if length(EntireString)<>20 then
    exit;
  StringStart := copy(EntireString,1,8);
  StringMiddle := copy(EntireString,9,4);
  StringEnd := copy(EntireString,13,8);
end;

Note that the out parameter type will set all output String* variables into '' before calling the function.

This version will expect entering entire string of 20 chars long.

You could use shortstrings, but with custom types of the exact length, if you want to avoid hidden copies from/to string[255] (which occur when you use a shortstring type and work with string[n] with n<255):

type 
  String20 = string[20];
  String4 = string[4];
  String8 = string[8];

procedure StringSplit(const EntireString: String20; out StringStart: String8;
            out StringMiddle: String4; out StringEnd: String8);
begin
  if length(EntireString)<>20 then
    exit;
  StringStart := copy(EntireString,1,8);
  StringMiddle := copy(EntireString,9,4);
  StringEnd := copy(EntireString,13,8);
end;
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