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It is very common that using PHP to connect MySQL. The most common method is like this:

$sqlcon=mysql_connect("localhost","user","pw");
mysql_select_db('database');
$sqlcomm=mysql_query("SELECT id FROM bd");
while($row=mysql_fetch_row($sqlcomm))
{
   //do something
}
mysql_close($sqlcon);

I think this is the fastest direct way to connect MySQL. But in project, there will have too many MySQL connections in php script, we should use "mysql_connect("localhost","user","pw")" code to connect MySQL in every php script. So you will like to build a MySQL class or function in a file to connect MySQL:

function connect( $query )
{
   $sqlcon=mysql_connect("localhost","user","pw");
   mysql_select_db('database');
   $sqlcomm=mysql_query($query);
   while($row=mysql_fetch_row($sqlcomm))
   {
       //do something.
   }
   mysql_close($sqlcon);
}

and then include into your project using include() for connection.

include('connect.php');
$data = connect('SELECT id from db');

OK, in this way, the code is look better. But using include() function will let PHP to read and execute other php script files, a I/O operation on harddisk again, it will also slow down the performance.

If the webpage is 100PV/s, php will read and execute a one php script 100 times/s in first method, but read and execute php script 200 times/s in this method!

I here show a simple example for only one query. Try image a high network multi-query environment.

Dose any one have other better way to make MySQL connection more easier and more efficient?

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Both of method are not much efficient –  Framework Mar 31 '11 at 12:29
1  
Not closing your connection every query would be more efficient. The connection is automatically closed after the request, so just 1 connect, and default disconnect on exit / end of request would do (unless you have unusally long-lived processes). –  Wrikken Mar 31 '11 at 12:32
    
OMG another it will slow down the performance question! –  Your Common Sense Mar 31 '11 at 12:50

6 Answers 6

You don't really need to open that many connections. You just open 1 connection at the start of your script (before <body> gets generated, let's say), and then close it at the end of your script (after </body> is generated, let's say). That leaves you with only 1 connection. In between, you can execute as many queries as you need.

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that's common approach. Though, there's actually no need to hold connection that long. For example, if it takes 150ms to generate whole page and only 50ms are spent for working with DB, then connection is being wasted for 65% of time. To solve this, persistent connections (a.k.a. connection pool) should be used. –  binaryLV Mar 31 '11 at 12:40
    
@symcbean, depends. I have read that some DBMS need couple of MB to hold connection-specific data. Of course, if you have 16GB RAM on server, few hundreds of MB do not matter much. On the other hand, why would DBA have to set connection limit to 250, if it's more than enough with 20 connections to get the same job done? –  binaryLV Mar 31 '11 at 12:56
    
Yes, I knew that. But the most important think i want to ask is not how many connection opened, but the connection method. –  anlai Mar 31 '11 at 17:44

Have you looked at using PDO? it does connection pooling and what not andnot limited to mysql...

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Good old MySQL extension (the one that contains mysql_connect() and friends) can also do connection pooling - that's what persistent connections are for. Have to admit though that I have had some problems with persistent connections - new connections sometimes were opened when there still were free connections, which ultimately resulted in "too many connections". –  binaryLV Mar 31 '11 at 12:37
    
What's that go to do with the problem described? –  symcbean Mar 31 '11 at 12:45
    
rather than using your custom code perhaps better to use a library built specifically to do the job you want to do? –  Ian Wood Mar 31 '11 at 15:56

Have a look at Dibi.

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You use a class that opens a MySQL connection (username / password / db is inherited from some sort of configuration file) and when you query the db - it establishes a connection. That leads you on to using a framework that uses certain programing paradigms and so forth.

Also, you shouldn't worry about performance decrease because you're including a file. That should be the least of your worries. OS is doing many IOs, not just with the hard disk, your 1 file include won't be noticeable.

If you're asking whether there's more efficient way of connecting to a MySQL db without using mysql_, mysqli_, odbc or PDO - no, there isn't.

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performance lack would be insignificant. you must be concerned more about correct approach to the structure of your code than performance.

you can move your host/user/password into constants into separate files and include wherever you need them, more over you can use some design patterns for database object. like Singleton or Factory. they will provide more flexibility to your system.

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But in project, there are too many MySQL connections, we should type Username and Password code each time

There are lots of things wrong with this statement - even if you don't count the grammar.

If you mean that you have multiple servers with different datasets on them, then you should definitely consider consolidating them or using the federated engine to provide a single point of access.

Opening a new connection and closing it each time you run a query is very inneficient if you need to execute more than one query per script.

Realy you need to spend a lot of time thinking about why you need multiple database connections and eliminate them, but in the meantime, bearing in mind that connections are closed automatically when a script finishes.....

class connection_pool {
  var $conxns=array(
          'db1.example.com'=> 
              array ('host'=>'db1.example.com', 'user'=>'fred', 'password'=>'secret'),
          'db2.example.com'=> 
              array ('host'=>'db1.example.com', 'user'=>'admin', 'password'=>'xxx4'),
           ....
         );
  function get_handle($db)
  {
     if (!array_key_exists($db, $this->conxns)) {
          return false;
     }
     if (!@is_resource($this->conxns[$db]['handle'])) {
          $this->conxns[$db]['handle']=mysql_connect(
                 $this->conxns[$db]['host'],
                 $this->conxns[$db]['user'],
                 $this->conxns[$db]['password']
                 );
     }
     return $this->conxns[$db]['handle'];
  }
}

(NB never use 'USE database' if you have multiple databases on a single mysql instance - always explicitly state the database name in queries)

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