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Okay, I'm going to try and go short and straight to the point. I am trying to develop a loosely-coupled, multi-tier service application that is testable and supports dependency injection. Here's what I have:

At the service layer, I have a StartSession method that accepts some key data required to, well, start the session. My service class is a facade and delegates to an instance of the ISessionManager interface that is injected into the service class constructor.

I am using the Repository pattern in the data access layer. So I have an ISessionRepository that my domain objects will work with and that I implement using the data access technology du jour. ISessionRepository has methods for GetById, Add and Update.

Since my service class is just a facade, I think it is safe to say that my ISessionManager implementation is the actual service class in my architecture. This class coordinates the operations with my Session domain/business object. And here's where the shell game and problem comes in.

In my SessionManager class (the concrete ISessionManager), here's how I have StartSession implemented:

public ISession StartSession(object sessionStartInfo)
{
    var session = Session.GetSession(sessionStartInfo);

    if (session == null)
        session = Session.NewSession(sessionStartInfo);

    return session;
}

I have three problems with this code:

  • First, obviously I could move this logic into a StartSession method in my Session class but I think that would defeat the purpose of the SessionManager class which then simply becomes a second facade (or is it still considered a coordinator?). Alas, the shell game.
     
  • Second, SessionManager has a tightly-coupled dependance upon the Session class. I considered creating an ISessionFactory/SessionFactory that could be injected into SessionManager but then I'd have the same tight-coupling inside the factory. But, maybe that's okay?
     
  • Finally, it seems to me that true DI and factory methods don't mix. After all, we want to avoid "new"ing an instance of an object and let the container return the instance to us. And true DI says that we should not reference the container directly. So, how then do I get the concrete ISessionRepository class injected into my Session domain object? Do I have it injected into the factory class then manually pass it into Session when constructing a new instance (using "new")?
     

Keep in mind that this is also only one operation and I also need to perform other tasks such as saving a session, listing sessions based on various criteria plus work with other domain objects in my solution. Plus, the Session object also encapsulates business logic for authorization, validation, etc. so (I think) it needs to be there.

The key to what I am looking to accomplish is not only functional but testable. I am using DI to break dependencies so we can easily implement unit tests using mocks as well as give us the ability to make changes to the concrete implementations without requiring changes in multiple areas.

Can you help me wrap my head around the best practices for such a design and how I can best achieve my goals for a solid SOA, DDD and TDD solution?

UPDATE

I was asked to provide some additional code, so as succinctly as possible:

[ServiceContract()]
public class SessionService : ISessionService
{
    public SessionService(ISessionManager manager) { Manager = manager; }

    public ISessionManager Manager { get; private set; }

    [OperationContract()]
    public SessionContract StartSession(SessionCriteriaContract criteria)
    {
        var session = Manager.StartSession(Mapper.Map<SessionCriteria>(criteria));

        return Mapper.Map<SessionContract>(session);
    }
}

public class SessionManager : ISessionManager
{
    public SessionManager() { }

    public ISession StartSession(SessionCriteria criteria)
    {
        var session = Session.GetSession(criteria);

        if (session == null)
            session = Session.NewSession(criteria);

        return session;
    }
}

public class Session : ISession
{
    public Session(ISessionRepository repository, IValidator<ISession> validator)
    {
        Repository = repository;
        Validator = validator;
    }

    // ISession Properties

    public static ISession GetSession(SessionCriteria criteria)
    {
        return Repository.FindOne(criteria);
    }

    public static ISession NewSession(SessionCriteria criteria)
    {
        var session = ????;

        // Set properties based on criteria object

        return session;
    }

    public Boolean Save()
    {
        if (!Validator.IsValid(this))
            return false;

        return Repository.Save(this);
    }
}

And, obviously, there is an ISessionRepository interface and concrete XyzSessionRepository class that I don't think needs to be shown.

2nd UPDATE

I added the IValidator dependency to the Session domain object to illustrate that there are other components in use.

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Could you post more of the code? It's not clear what each of the classes do--for example, is the Session class the service class that gets injected, or are there three distinct classes (Session, SessionManager, SessionService)? –  Phil Sandler Mar 31 '11 at 13:53
    
They are distinct classes. –  SonOfPirate Mar 31 '11 at 13:55
    
Is the Session class static? Again, a little more code would clarify a lot. –  Phil Sandler Mar 31 '11 at 13:56
    
Session is the domain object (root). –  SonOfPirate Mar 31 '11 at 14:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The posted code clarifies a lot. It looks to me like the session class holds state (with behavior), and the service and manager classes strictly perform actions/behavior.

You might look at removing the Repository dependency from the Session and adding it to the SessionManager. So instead of the Session calling Repository.Save(this), your Manager class would have a Save(ISession session) method that would then call Repository.Save(session). This would mean that the session itself would not need to be managed by the container, and it would be perfectly reasonable to create it via "new Session()" (or using a factory that does the same). I think the fact that the Get- and New- methods on the Session are static is a clue/smell that they may not belong on that class (does this code compile? Seems like you are using an instance property within a static method).

Finally, it seems to me that true DI and factory methods don't mix. After all, we want to avoid "new"ing an instance of an object and let the container return the instance to us. And true DI says that we should not reference the container directly. So, how then do I get the concrete ISessionRepository class injected into my Session domain object? Do I have it injected into the factory class then manually pass it into Session when constructing a new instance (using "new")?

This question gets asked a LOT when it comes to managing classes that mix state and service via an IOC container. As soon as you use an abstract factory that uses "new", you lose the benefits of a DI framework from that class downward in the object graph. You can get away from this by completely separating state and service, and having only your classes that provide service/behavior managed by the container. This leads to passing all data through method calls (aka functional programming). Some containers (Windsor for one) also provide a solution to this very problem (in Windsor it's called the Factory Facility).

Edit: wanted to add that functional programming also leads to what Fowler would call "anemic domain models". This is generally considered a bad thing in DDD, so you might have to weigh that against the advice I posted above.

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So if I injected the ISessionRepository into the SessionManager class and eliminated the factory methods from Session, where would the logic go for retrieving and creating new Session instances? In SessionManager, the repository or would it be better to have a SessionFactory handle that responsibility? –  SonOfPirate Mar 31 '11 at 16:08
    
To take things a step farther, I added the dependency on a validator to the Session domain object. So even if I move the dependency on the repository out, I still have to deal with this one (and any other potential collaborators). –  SonOfPirate Mar 31 '11 at 17:33
    
Can these additional collaborators not also be coordindated by the manager? –  Phil Sandler Mar 31 '11 at 18:52
    
That's part of my quandry - who should be responsible for what in the flow of the application. Yes, I could put the validation in the manager class, but then assuming I have many more domain objects do I end up with a manager class for each or 1 manager that accepts a bunch of collaborators injected? My understanding of DDD is that I should have 1 repository for each domain root or aggregate root, so now I will have 3 classes for each (manager, domain object, repository). I'm not opposed to it as long as it really makes sense. Does that extend all the way up to the service facade as well? –  SonOfPirate Mar 31 '11 at 19:53
    
If it makes sense to have three classes for each, and if each one has a distinct set of responsibilities, you should see that as a GOOD think, because this kind of separation leads to solid (and SOLID :)software design. –  Phil Sandler Mar 31 '11 at 20:58

Just some comments...

After all, we want to avoid "new"ing an instance of an object and let the container return the instance to us.

this ain't true for 100%. You want to avoid "new"ing only across so called seams which basically are lines between layers. if You try to abstract persistence with repositories - that's a seam, if You try to decouple domain model from UI (classic one - system.web reference), there's a seam. if You are in same layer, then decoupling one implementation from another sometimes makes little sense and just adds additional complexity (useless abstraction, ioc container configuration etc.). another (obvious) reason You want to abstract something is when You already right now need polymorphism.

And true DI says that we should not reference the container directly.

this is true. but another concept You might be missing is so called composition root (it's good for things to have a name :). this concept resolves confusion with "when to use service locator". idea is simple - You should compose Your dependency graph as fast as possible. there should be 1 place only where You actually reference ioc container.

E.g. in asp.net mvc application, common point for composition is ControllerFactory.

Do I have it injected into the factory class then manually pass it into Session when constructing a new instance

As I see so far, factories are generally good for 2 things:

1.To create complex objects (Builder pattern helps significantly)
2.Resolving violations of open closed and single responsibility principles

public void PurchaseProduct(Product product){
  if(product.HasSomething) order.Apply(new FirstDiscountPolicy());
  if(product.HasSomethingElse) order.Apply(new SecondDiscountPolicy());
}

becomes as:

public void PurchaseProduct(Product product){
  order.Apply(DiscountPolicyFactory.Create(product));
}

In that way Your class that holds PurchaseProduct won't be needed to be modified if new discount policy appears in sight and PurchaseProduct would become responsible for purchasing product only instead of knowing what discount to apply.

P.s. if You are interested in DI, You should read "Dependency injection in .NET" by Mark Seemann.

share|improve this answer
    
My issue with not referencing the IoC container is when we need to create a new instance of a type that has dependencies injected. In a typical solution, mapping the concrete implementations to the interface we code against is done in the client application (service host for WCF, for instance). Unless I have the container automatically create the instance and inject it, at some point I have to reference the container. For example, if FirstDiscountPolicy and SecondDiscountPolicy required something via constructor injection how would DiscountPolicyFactory create them? –  SonOfPirate Apr 1 '11 at 1:53
    
+1. Great answer and excellent book recommendation. –  Mike Apr 13 '11 at 12:47

I thought I'd post the approach I ended up following while giving due credit above.

After reading some additional articles on DDD, I finally came across the observation that our domain objects should not be responsible for their creation or persistence as well as the notion that it is okay to "new" an instance of a domain object from within the Domain Layer (as Arnis eluded).

So, I retained my SessionManager class but renamed it SessionService so it would be clearer that it is a Domain Service (not to be confused with the SessionService in the facade layer). It is now implemented like:

public class SessionService : ISessionService
{
    public SessionService(ISessionFactory factory, ISessionRepository repository)
    {
        Factory = factory;
        Repository = repository;
    }

    public ISessionFactory Factory { get; private set; }
    public ISessionRepository Repository { get; private set; }

    public ISession StartSession(SessionCriteria criteria)
    {
        var session = Repository.GetSession(criteria);

        if (session == null)
            session = Factory.CreateSession(criteria);
        else if (!session.CanResume)
            thrown new InvalidOperationException("Cannot resume the session.");

        return session;
    }
}

The Session class is now more of a true domain object only concerned with the state and logic required when working with the Session, such as the CanResume property shown above and validation logic.

The SessionFactory class is responsible for creating new instances and allows me to still inject the ISessionValidator instance provided by the container without directly referencing the container itself:

public class SessionFactory : ISessionFactory
{
    public SessionFactory(ISessionValidator validator)
    {
        Validator = validator;
    }

    public ISessionValidator Validator { get; private set; }

    public Session CreateSession(SessionCriteria criteria)
    {
        var session = new Session(Validator);

        // Map properties

        return session;
    }
}

Unless someone can point out a flaw in my approach, I'm pretty comfortable that this is consistent with DDD and gives me full support for unit testing, etc. - everything I was after.

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