Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to implement extension method, which converts enum to dictionary.

public static Dictionary<int, string> ToDictionary(this Enum @enum)
            {
                Type type1 = @enum.GetType();
                return Enum.GetValues(type1).Cast<type1>()
                    //.OfType<typeof(@enum)>()
                    .ToDictionary(e => Enum.GetName(@enum.GetType(), e));
            }

Why it doesn't compile?

An error

"The type or namespace name 'type1' could not be found (are you missing a using directive or an assembly reference?)"

share|improve this question
2  
Why don't you show us the error message? –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 31 '11 at 12:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 29 down vote accepted

Jon Skeet has written everything you need ;)

But here you have your code that is working:

public static Dictionary<int, string> ToDictionary(this Enum @enum)
{
  var type = @enum.GetType();
  return Enum.GetValues(type).Cast<int>().ToDictionary(e => e, e => Enum.GetName(type, e));
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, it's good! –  Alexandre Mar 31 '11 at 13:13
1  
You can simplify it slightly by writing Cast<int> instead of Cast<object>, because then you can omit the cast from object to int in the first lambda-expression. –  Elian Ebbing Mar 31 '11 at 13:14
    
Yes, you right :) Good tips :) Thx –  Rafal Spacjer Mar 31 '11 at 13:15
2  
This isn't going to work for all Enum underlying types. Also check that typeof(int) == Enum.GetUnderlyingType(type). –  Martin Thomson Jul 12 '13 at 19:23
    
If you're using the lowercase type of enum, use typeof(@enum) instead of @enum.GetType(). –  Andrew Feb 12 at 14:40

Well, you're trying to use a variable of type Type as a generic type argument. You can't do that with generics, which are about compile-time types.

You can do it with reflection, but it would be better to make it a generic method. Unfortunately you can't constrain a generic type parameter to be an enum, although I have some hacks to work around that in Unconstrained Melody.

Failing that, you could use just a struct type constraint for a generic method which would be a good start.

Now, the next problem is that you're trying to get a Dictionary<int, string> - but the values of an enum aren't int values. They might be convertable to int values, but they aren't there immediately. You could use Convert.ToInt32 to do that, but you would have to do something.

Finally (for the moment) what would you expect to happen with an enum using a uint or long underlying type?

share|improve this answer

Based on Daniel's solution

public static SelectList ToSelectList<TEnum>(this HtmlHelper h) where TEnum : struct
{
 return new SelectList(FortunaExtension.ToDictionary<TEnum>(), "Key", "Value");
}
share|improve this answer

You can't use type1 as a generic parameter, because it is a variable, not a type.

The following code does something similar to what your code shows:

public static Dictionary<string, TEnum> ToDictionary<TEnum>()
    where TEnum : struct
{
    if (!typeof(TEnum).IsEnum)
        throw new ArgumentException("Type must be an enumeration");
    return Enum.GetValues(typeof(TEnum)).Cast<TEnum>().
            ToDictionary(e => Enum.GetName(typeof(TEnum), e));
}

Use it like this:

ToDictionary<Colors>()

But I am not really sure, this is, what you expected?
Additionally, it has one problem: You can pass any struct, not just enums and this will result in a runtime exception. See Jon's answer for more details about that.

share|improve this answer
    
It's not what I expect. I want to use extension method. –  Alexandre Mar 31 '11 at 13:09
    
Show a code sample of your usage and the expected output. (Because it doesn't seem to make sense to invoke this as an extension method) –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 31 '11 at 13:10
1  
@Alex Maslakov: an extension method is not really appropriate here as you are building a dictionary from the data about the enum that is available statically (i.e. it is data in the enum type definition rather than using the properties of a particular enum value). Extension methods operate on an instance of a type. –  Paul Ruane Mar 31 '11 at 13:15
    
@Paul Ruane, you are right. –  Alexandre Mar 31 '11 at 13:26

Here is the extension method I use to convert enumerations, only difference is that I am returning IEnumerbale> for my purpose:

public static IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<int, string>> ToListOfKeyValuePairs<TEnum>(this TEnum enumeration) where TEnum : struct
{
    return from TEnum e in Enum.GetValues(typeof(TEnum))
            select new KeyValuePair<int, string>
                (
                    (int)Enum.Parse(typeof(TEnum), e.ToString()),
                    Regex.Replace(e.ToString(), "[A-Z]", x => string.Concat(" ", x.Value[0])).Trim()
                );
}

It also adds spaces for the Value.

Example:

enum Province
{
    BritishColumbia = 0,
    Ontario = 1
}

Usage:

<select>
<% foreach(var item in Province.BritishColumbia.ToListOfKeyValuePairs()){ %>
    <option value="<%=item.Key %>"><%=item.Value %></option>
<% } %>
</select>

Output:

<select>
    <option value="0">British Columbia</option>
    <option value="1">Ontario</option>
</select>

Though @Paul Ruane is correct I have found this to be a very useful extension method. It's not a perfect world.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.