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I want to develop a Android App which will use a SIP Server of my client. My client is exposing couple of REST API from the SIP server for communicating with the apps.

I want to know which would be the best codec type for this app?

Basically, I want to create a SIP-Stack and send the SIP Packets to the Server. So, there should be a coding and decoding system for the packets. My client prefers 16 kb/sec but I am not sure which should I use.

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I am totally new in VOIP area. In details, my client has a API which is based on REST. My task is to create a app which enable the user to call using WiFi or Cellular Network and SIP Server of my client. So, my client wanted to know the type of the codec i will use (which I am not sure). I also have to fetch user's data using the API i mentioned earlier. Please suggest me the working procedure that I should follow. –  Foysal Mar 31 '11 at 13:43
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5 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

As others have said, SIP does not transfer audio or video. Although in theory, you can send data over any transport, including ATM, analog lines, a DS0, etc, in the real world, RTP is the most common. RTP (Real Time Protocol) and RTCP (Real Time Control Protocol) or SRTP (Secure RTP) usually carry the audio and video.

As far as codecs go, you will be limited by what your server supports. Here are a few common codecs and some pros and cons of each.

G.711 - Toll quality (ie good as a good analog phone line, or even a bit better). "Universal" in that virtually every device supports G.711. Takes a lot of bandwidth, it doesn't really compress data (G.711 is a "compander"). The baseline G.711 is pretty bare-bones (its really a couple of look up tables). Appendix I adds packet loss concealment (PLC) and Appendix II adds silence suppression and comfort noise generation.

GSM - used on cellphones, sounds ok, good PLC, good compression

G.729A - widely used, near toll quality, good compression (8Kbps)

G.723.1 - widely used, almost as good as G.729, better compression (4-5Kbps)

G.722 - sounds better than G.711, wideband (twice the audio bandwidth of G.711 or an analog call), same bandwidth used on the line as G.711

GIPS - various implemnetations exist, one is free. IIRC, uses about 13.5Kbps on the line, sound is not as good asG.723.1 (but this is a perceptual metric, YMMV) Takes a lot of processor.

All the codecs use some processor and other system resources, as a rule of thumb the more aggressive the codec (the smaller the bandwidth) the more processor used. Also, all of these particular codecs are lossy codecs--they lose some of the data. This means that there is compression, not that portions of the audio are dropped due to poor routing and poor line quality. Much like an MP3 is considered a LOSSY codec while FLAC is considered Lossless. If you're interested the following wikipedia article explains in further detail: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lossy_compression

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great explanation of the specs. of the codecs, but i thought the loss of data was due to the use of RTP ? –  olamotte Apr 1 '11 at 13:26
    
RTP is just a transport protocol. Loss of data can be caused by many factors, including: general line loss due to noise etc; RED (Random Early Discard) by some intermediate router; recieve buffer overflow (ie jitter buffer overflow); delay that is not constant (which causes packet starvation then buffer overflow), misbehaving routers, etc. –  Hank Karl Apr 20 '11 at 13:15
    
<caught by the 5 minute rule!> please add this to the above comment: Packet Loss Concealment (PLC) can help. But you can get packet loss on any line even if RTP is not used. BTW, SIP does not require RTP, nor do codecs require RTP, even though its rare to see one without the other. –  Hank Karl Apr 20 '11 at 13:27
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You need to know what codecs and protocols this SIP server will support. If you control both ends and want to stick to 16Kbps, you'll want iLBC (no royalties) or G.729 (royalties apply). G.711 and (now) G.722 have no royalties either, but both use ~64Kbps.

The list given before is good, with a few issues.:

GIPS - various implemnetations exist, one is free. IIRC, uses about 13.5Kbps on the line, sound is not as good asG.723.1 (but this is a perceptual metric, YMMV) Takes a lot of processor.

GIPS is not a codec - iLBC and iSAC are codecs designed by GIPS. iLBC is free and standardized. iLBC is high quality, 13 or 15Kbps, and is very resilient to packet loss compared to G.729 or even G.711. You can have 30 or even 50% loss with iLBC and still be understood. I'm not sure I'd say it uses a lot of CPU compared to say G.729.

All the codecs use some processor and other system resources, as a rule of thumb the more aggressive the codec (the smaller the bandwidth) the more processor used. Also, all codecs are lossy codecs--they lose some of the data.

Well, G.711 isn't really lossy per-se (in theory yes, but it's almost more quantization-level loss). 64K G.722 isn't very lossy either. G.723 sucks dead gerbils through garden hoses. :-)

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nice descripiton.thanks jesup –  Foysal Apr 8 '11 at 16:34
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It sounds like a bad idea to do it yourself. Developing a sip client is not a trivial task since there are several protocols you would have to implement. Choosing the coding is not very important decision compared to the rest.

imho you should use one of the open source sip stacks available (like pjsip) or build your application on top of an open source sip client (like sipdroid).

But since you asked for codec: Use the GSM codec. Saved bandwidth and sounds OK. G.711 is otherwise the standard codec that 99% of all sip servers support.

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could you add any usefull information on the "build your application on top of an open source sip client (like sipdroid)." I'm very interested in this. Thank you ! –  olamotte Mar 31 '11 at 14:58
    
Take sipdroid, change the GUI a bit and call it your own application. (don't forget to keep their copyright info) –  jgauffin Mar 31 '11 at 15:07
    
oh : it's sounds really easy but it might not be :P ! you're right about the copyright info, they had issues in 2009 according to their wiki. thanks anyway ! –  olamotte Mar 31 '11 at 15:20
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Any?

SIP does not send and deal with ANY data packets. SIP is the Session Initiation Protocol and it handles the NEGOTIATION OF SESSIONS.

The sessions then arae - in case of auio and video - are based on RTP and use RTSP for signalling. So, your question indicates a REAL lack of knowledge of what you need to do - the real uestion is: you need a RTP compatible codec.

Which is similar senseless. RTP is jsut a carrier protocol. THis is like asking "what is a HTTP compatioble image format". HTTP does not care. The browser does.

In case of RTP, it means - RTP does not care. It can transport ANY data. WHat is important is that BOTH SIDES know the same codec. So, in your case it means:

  • If you program both sides then it is your choice.
  • If you program only one sidwe (like a SIP phone system), then the question is waht "normal" programs handle.
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speed-typing, ehh? ;) –  jgauffin Mar 31 '11 at 14:07
    
Actually yes ;) Need to work on my typing "accuracy". –  TomTom Mar 31 '11 at 14:13
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There are two things you need to take into consideration here:

  • What other devices/servers that handle media are being deployed or are planned to be deployed
  • Is your customer looking for narrowband or wideband solution - this will affect the voice quality of the call greatly

Once you have nailed down the answers to the two questions above you will be able to select. For mobile devices, the voice codecs usually used are AMR-NB or AMR-WB. For SIP it is usually G.729 or G.722.x. You also have Speex, ISAC and SILK to choose from. You will probably need to do G.711 in any case just to interoperate with everything - bandwidth will be higher though.

No easy answer here. If your customer can select, or state what other devices are being used - it will be easier for you to select.

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