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I know you can set this in the Preferences of the SDK, but I worry that it won't be correct when the app is deployed. What is the PYTHON_PATH value out on Google's Cloud? Can I set this?

Going backwards a step, I just want to be able to do:

from something import something_else

My app can't resolve this reference, which is what led me to trying to get the PYTHON_PATH.

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What error are you getting? Is something_else a module inside the something package, or a symbol inside the something module? –  Brandon Rhodes Mar 31 '11 at 13:41
    
@Brandon: I wish I could answer that correctly, but this is my first Python project. I have a file called "something.py" in which I have a class defined called "something_else". I'm trying to make that class available to my handler. –  Deane Mar 31 '11 at 15:37
    
Where is 'something.py'? The simplest solution to making this work is to put it in the root directory of your app. –  Nick Johnson Mar 31 '11 at 23:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Once your code is deployed, it will have access to all of the supported libraries without you taking any action. In order to add your application-specific directories to the path, you will need to do it programatically inside your handler. I use a pattern like this:

paths = [
    os.path.join(os.path.dirname(__file__), 'mylib'),
    os.path.join(os.path.dirname(__file__), 'app', 'tags'),
    os.path.join(os.path.dirname(__file__), 'app', 'controllers'),
    os.path.join(os.path.dirname(__file__), 'app', 'common'),
    os.path.join(os.path.dirname(__file__), 'app', 'models'),
    os.path.join(os.path.dirname(__file__), 'app')
]
for path in paths:
    if os.path.exists(path):
        # Don't add paths that don't exist.
        sys.path.append(path)

If you find that you are having a problem importing a module that is not part of your application, it may be that the module is not supported on AppEngine. See the docs for more information.

EDIT: Everyone structures their AppEngine applications a little differrently, but generally, you'll need to have this code at the main entry point for each .py file that is listed as a handler in your app.yaml. Generally, a handler file will have something that looks like this:

def main():
    # Do all of my initialization and run my
    # WSGIApplication

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()

You can out the path-setting code inside the main() function.

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Where do you put this code, normally? Do you put it in every handler, or do you make a base handler and inherit your handlers from that? –  Deane Mar 31 '11 at 13:53
    
@Deane: answered your question in the post. –  Adam Crossland Mar 31 '11 at 14:11

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