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Something very strange.

var body="Received: from  ([195.000.000.0])\r\nReceived: from  ([77.000.000.000]) by   (6.0.000.000)"
var lastMath="";
var subExp = "[\\[\\(](\\d+\\.\\d+\\.\\d+\\.\\d+)[\\]\\)]"
var re = new RegExp("Received\\: from.*?"+subExp +".*", "mg");
var re1 = new RegExp(subExp , "mg");
while(ares= re.exec(body))
{
        print(ares[0])
        while( ares1 = re1.exec(ares[0]))
        {
            if(!IsLocalIP(ares1[1]))
            {
                 print(ares1[1]) 
                 lastMath=ares1[1];
                 break ;
            }
        }

}
print(lastMath)

It outputs:

Received: from ([195.000.000.0])
195.000.000.0
Received: from ([77.000.000.000]) by (6.0.000.000)
6.0.000.000
6.0.000.000

But I think it should be:

Received: from ([195.000.000.0])
195.000.000.0
Received: from ([77.000.000.000]) by (6.0.000.000)
77.000.000.000
77.000.000.000

Because obviously "77.000.000.000" goes first. If I comment "break", output order is correct. What's wrong with my code?

share|improve this question
1  
please change the title to something more descriptive –  Jason S Mar 31 '11 at 14:08
    
+1 for finding weird behavior. –  Jason S Mar 31 '11 at 14:32
    
Ok, I changed the title. I think that the interface of RegExp is ambiguous. It could be much clearer if it used for finding subsequent matches something like next(), but not exec(arg). –  alehro Mar 31 '11 at 15:25
    
You (as well as the rest of us) are a victim of the browser wars of the late 1990s, when features were being launched left and right that are now locked in to the language for legacy reasons. –  Jason S Mar 31 '11 at 15:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Note that regex grouping in Javascript (and most languages) does not work with a very obvious behavior with the * or + operators. For example:

js>r = /^(ab[0-9])+$/
/^(ab[0-9])+$/
js>"ab1ab2ab3ab4".match(r)
ab1ab2ab3ab4,ab4    

In this case, you get the last group that matches and that's it. I'm not sure where this behavior is specified, but it can vary from language to language.

edit: What does IsLocalIP() do?


OK, I think the problem has to do with exec's statefulness (which may be why I don't use it; I use String.match()) -- if you're going to do this, you need to manually initialize the regex's lastindex property to 0, otherwise you get this behavior:

function weird(dobreak)
{
  var s = "Received: from  ([77.000.000.000]) by   (6.0.000.000)"
  var re1 = /[\[\(](\d+\.\d+\.\d+\.\d+)[\]\)]/mg
  while (s2 = re1.exec(s))
  {
    writeln("s2="+s2);
    if (dobreak)
      break;
  }
}

produces this result:

js>weird(true)
js>weird(true)
s2=[77.000.000.000],77.000.000.000
js>weird(true)
s2=(6.0.000.000),6.0.000.000
js>weird(true)
js>

You'll note that the same function gets three different results, which implies statefulness is mucking things up for some bizarre reason (Javascript is caching/interning the regex somehow? I'm using JSDB which uses Spidermonkey = Firefox's javascript engine).

So if I change the code to the following:

function notweird(dobreak)
{
  var s = "Received: from  ([77.000.000.000]) by   (6.0.000.000)"
  var re1 = /[\[\(](\d+\.\d+\.\d+\.\d+)[\]\)]/mg
  re1.lastIndex = 0;
  while (s2 = re1.exec(s))
  {
    writeln("s2="+s2);
    if (dobreak)
      break;
  }
}

Then I get the expected behavior:

js>notweird(true)
s2=[77.000.000.000],77.000.000.000
js>notweird(true)
s2=[77.000.000.000],77.000.000.000
js>notweird(true)
s2=[77.000.000.000],77.000.000.000
share|improve this answer
    
But if comment "break" then output is: Received: from ([195.000.000.0])<br> 195.000.000.0<br> Received: from ([77.000.000.000]) by (6.0.000.000)<br> 77.000.000.000<br> 6.0.000.000<br> Ie, the order is as I wanted. It looks that "break" works incorrect. –  alehro Mar 31 '11 at 14:01
    
"break" doesn't work incorrectly, see my edited answer. –  Jason S Mar 31 '11 at 14:34
    
Thanks a lot. Actually, the problem isn't in cashing. Cashing occurs only when you use regexp literals. I use explicit initialization for this reason. The problem that interface of RegExp allows incorrect using. –  alehro Mar 31 '11 at 15:29
    
RegExp with the "g" flag expects you to fully consume a string before moving on to the next one. Because you break out, you need to manually reset lastIndex to 0 as if the string had been consumed. –  Neil Apr 5 '11 at 23:08

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