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Folks,

I know this question has been asked before here, though indirectly. But it didn't answer my doubt.
Question : Is it legal to call the start method twice on the same Thread?

From the spec,

It is never legal to start a thread more than once. In particular, a thread may not be restarted once it has completed execution.

I agree. But my code doesn't throw a IllegalThreadStateException which it is expected to throw on execution of following program.

   public class Tester extends Thread {
        public void run() {
            System.out.print("run");
        }
        public static void main(String[] args) {
            Tester thread = new Tester();
            new Thread(thread).start();
            new Thread(thread).start();
        }
    }    

Q.1) I ran the above code in Eclipse. Here, since I am trying to start a new thread on the same instance, a IllegalThreadStateException is expected to be thrown. But it doesn't.

Why ?

Q.2) If at all we did start a new thread on the same instance, what harm it would do ?

Any help would be greatly appreciated !

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1  
I don't think it's (only) a matter of what harm it would do. I think it's more of a matter of it making no sense. What does it mean to start a thread that is already running? Can you start a car that is already running? That idea just makes no sense. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 31 '11 at 14:19

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Firstly, you are invoking on two different thread objects ie:

 new Thread(thread).start();
 new Thread(thread).start();

you are calling start method on two different instances. for which reason you are not getting the exception.

try with following to get the exception

thread.start();
thread.start();

For your second question. you can get the answer here : why cant we call start method twice on a same instance of the Thread object?

which is fortunately asked by me :)

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Thanks. Any idea on Q.2 ? –  99tm Mar 31 '11 at 14:09
    
+1 ............ –  99tm Mar 31 '11 at 14:21

You are NOT calling start() on the same instance. Everytime you use new you are creating a distinct instance. Hence no problem calling start().

If you did this:

 Thread t = new Thread(thread);
 t.start();
 t.start();

Then you may have a problem.

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+1 .... Thanks ! I got it cleared. What about Q.2 ? –  99tm Mar 31 '11 at 14:09

Can java thread invoke start more than once ?

You can involve start() as often as you like. However you will get an IllegalThreadStateException if you call it more than once on the same Thread.

Q.1) I ran the above code in Eclipse. Here, since I am trying to start a new thread on the same instance, a IllegalThreadStateException is expected to be thrown. But it doesn't.

Thats because you created three different threads. One is the Tester and two wrap the Tester.

Q.2) If at all we did start a new thread on the same instance, what harm it would do ?

Other than create confusion, none. You shouldn't do this. Instead the Tester should implement Runnable.

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Q.1) I ran the above code in Eclipse. Here, since I am trying to start a new thread on the same instance, a IllegalThreadStateException is expected to be thrown. But it doesn't.

You are not caling start() on same instance.

new Thread(thread).start();

the above statement is same as

new Thread((Runnable)thread).start();
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I took the liberty of formatting your answer. I hope this was ok. –  Peter Lawrey Mar 31 '11 at 14:08
1  
@Peter: thank you –  Prince John Wesley Mar 31 '11 at 14:09

And here we see why the Executors make so much sense.

Typical idiomatic Java would say that you shouldn't run your own threads much at all; create an executor service, and let it manage the threads. You just create Runnable instances and pass those to the executor service; you can call Runnable's run() method as often as you like, whenever and wherever it makes sense to do so, and you don't have to concern yourself with Thread management at that point.

Extending Thread is also a one-shot deal; extending superclasses in Java is expensive (since you get ONE superclass, that's it). However, you can extend as many interfaces as you like, so Runnable gives you a more powerful object hierarchy as well.

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What this answer has relation to my question ? –  99tm Mar 31 '11 at 14:13
1  
Well, IMO, the answer to your question was pretty obvious, on the surface of it: no, it's not legal to call start() twice on the same instance of Thread. The first question used an invalid supposition (you weren't calling start() twice on the same instance of Thread, you were creating two separate Thread instances). The second question has no real meaning, since the definition of Thread means that you can't start it twice; you'll get an illegal state. So what I did was to try to think of possible tasks you were trying to achieve. Using runnables means you can seem to run it twice. –  Joseph Ottinger Mar 31 '11 at 15:07

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