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This is a bit of an odd one and apologies if I don't explain it very well.

I am using the following simple code to send messages that I have popped off a queue, using a simple TCP socket, the messages are sent over localhost to another port on the same machine -

try
{
    Socket.Select(null, writeList, null, 120000000/*120 seconds*/);
}
catch (SocketException e)
{
    log.Error("Select returned an error waiting to send... " + e.Message + " Errorcode: " + e.ErrorCode);
    connected = false;
    socket.Close();
}

bool readyToWrite = false;
for (int i = 0; i < writeList.Count; i++)
{
    readyToWrite = true;
}

if (readyToWrite)
{
    try
    {
        //log.Debug("Sending message type: " + message.header.msgType);
        socket.Send(message, message.header.dataLength, SocketFlags.None);                        
        //log.Debug("Message sent");
    }
    catch (SocketException e)
    {
        log.Error(e.Message + " Error code: " + e.ErrorCode);
        connected = false;
        socket.Close();                        
    }

}
else
{
    log.Error("Not able to write - stopping sender thread and closing socket");
    connected = false;
    socket.Close();
}

This normally works fine and in fact my application sends several messages to the other end without a problem initially.

However, I then add 10 or so messages in quick succession to the queue, which get popped off and sent ok, seemingly - the log statements show Send() returned ok and when I look at a network trace it seems the other end has acknowledged them.

But it hasn't. The other end is in a loop calling select() with a one second timeout and this keeps coming back with no data to read, until about 30 seconds later (the same every time), all the messages arrive at the other end all at once.

C++ code from the other side of the connection -

while (m_bRunning && bOK && !bReadyToRead)
{
    m_bIsAlive = true;

    switch(pSocket->Select(1, true))
    {
    case 1:     // Ready to read
        //TRACE("Data ready to be read from RAM\n");
        bReadyToRead = true;
        break;

    case 0:     // Select timed out
        if (GetTickCount() > dwTimeout)
        {
            bOK = false;
        }
        // else No action needed
        break;

        default:    // Error detected
            TRACE("Select returned error...\n");
            bOK = false;
            break;
    }
}

// Try and read a message header
iBytesExpected = sizeof(RAM_HEADER);    

while ((m_bRunning && bOK) && (iBytesSoFar < iBytesExpected))
{
    m_bIsAlive = true;

    iBytesRead = pSocket->Read(pWritePos, iBytesExpected-iBytesSoFar);

The C++ select wrapper looks like this -

int CRawSocket::Select(ULONG ulTimeoutSeconds, bool bCheckRead)
{
    int iResult = -1;           // Error by default
    int iSelectReturn = 0;
    fd_set readSet;
    fd_set writeSet;
    struct timeval timeout;

    timeout.tv_sec = ulTimeoutSeconds;
    timeout.tv_usec = 0;

    FD_ZERO(&readSet);
    FD_ZERO(&writeSet);

    if (bCheckRead)
    {
        FD_SET(m_hSocket, &readSet);
        iSelectReturn = select(1, &readSet, NULL, NULL, &timeout);
    }
    else
    {
        FD_SET(m_hSocket, &writeSet);
        iSelectReturn = select(1, NULL, &writeSet, NULL, &timeout);
    }

    if(iSelectReturn != SOCKET_ERROR)
    {
        if (FD_ISSET(m_hSocket, &readSet))
        {
            iResult = 1;        // Ready to READ
        }
        else if (FD_ISSET(m_hSocket, &writeSet))
        {
            iResult = 2;        // Ready to WRITE
        }
        else
        {
            iResult = 0;        // Select TIMED OUT
        }
    }
    else 
    {
        const int e = WSAGetLastError();
        ERRORLOG("Select socket error %lu\n", e);
        iResult = -1;           // Some error occurred
    }

    return iResult;
}

And the read method -

int CReadWriteSocket::Read(void *pData, int nLen) 
{
    char* pcData = (char* )pData;
    int n = nLen;
    // if data size is bigger then network buffer
    // handle it nice
    do
    {
        int r1 = ::recv (m_hSocket, pcData, n, 0);
        if (r1 == SOCKET_ERROR)
        {
            int e = WSAGetLastError();
            if (e == WSAEWOULDBLOCK)
            {
                return nLen - n;
            }
            else
            {
                TRACE("Socket Read error %d\n", e);
                return -1;      // error other than would block detected
            }
        }
        else if (r1 == 0)       // Connection has closed
        {
            TRACE("Socket appears to have closed (zero bytes read)\n");
            return -1;          // Show this as an "error"
        }
        else if (r1 < 0)
        {
            ASSERT(0);
            return nLen - n;
        }

        pcData += r1;
        n -= r1;
    } while (n > 0);

    ASSERT(n == 0);
    return nLen;
}

I am completely confused as this seems to be standard code that I use all over the place and i've never seen a problem like this occur.

It has been suggested trying the NoDelay socket option, but that had no effect - and infact this would never cause delays of this length from what I am aware.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated! Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
TCP promises things will be delivered in-order; suggest at least one bug there. Just a quick observation! –  Kieren Johnstone Mar 31 '11 at 14:11
    
The ordering may not be incorrect, it might just appear that way, but the main issue is the delay! –  Adam Cobb Mar 31 '11 at 14:12

5 Answers 5

TCP is a stream protocol. You cannot assume that the 'packets' you Send() are going to be delivered and received in tact. At the transmitting end, the Nagle algorithm tries to combine the data that was written in separate Send() calls to optimize delivery of the data. At the receiving end you'll Read() what is stored in the TCP buffer. If will be a combination of the transmitted packets if there's any delay. This is further complicated by the routers in between the transmitter and receiver, they are allowed to fragment an IP packet, turning a large one into multiple small ones, to accommodate the transmission channel's maximum packet size (MTU).

In other words, there is no reliable way to ensure that the packets are delivered the way they were sent. A simple workaround for this is first transmitting the size of the packet. At the receiving end you first read that size, then know how to count off the received bytes to reconstruct the packet.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks but the problem isn't really the order, that is correct when they do come through, it is the massive 30 second delay that is the issue. –  Adam Cobb Mar 31 '11 at 14:18
    
You are going to have to document the network characteristics better. There's nothing in your post that wouldn't suggest this is a simple hardware issue. –  Hans Passant Mar 31 '11 at 14:22
    
But if it's a hardware issue how are the initial messages getting through from my app fine? It's seemingly only when I trying and send multiple messages in quick succession that the problems occur. This is also all running on one machine, connecting over localhost, so very unlikely it's hardware related. –  Adam Cobb Mar 31 '11 at 14:25
    
Be sure to point this out in your question, it isn't obvious. –  Hans Passant Mar 31 '11 at 14:28

I am not sure if this is your problem and I am working off of a vague memory from yesteryear so please excuse the vagueness.

I seem to remember that Socket.Select() would return indicating it has zero data to read if the stream has an error. You may want to try passing a copy of the stream list in to the error list parameter and see if you get any in error.

Your code appears to be sending to the same socket regardless of what is in writelist. I would modify it to operate on the writelist even if you only have a single socket. Otherwise you'll be attempting to send to a socket even if it has not necessarily indicated it is ready for data yet (i.e. if the Socket.Select() is returning for some other reason, such as my hunch above). This may cause the write operation to block and may be the cause of the delay you are witnessing if you are operating with more than one socket.

Finally, you can break out of your readyToWrite loop as soon as the flag is set. Better still you can recode this as:

bool readyToWrite = writelist.Any();

But I would still suggest you replace this with a foreach loop on writelist:

foreach (Socket sock in writelist)
{
    // do stuff
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I'm not currently checking for errors on the select in that way, so it's a possibility, however with the messages getting through eventually it wouldn't seem like it could be this? –  Adam Cobb Mar 31 '11 at 14:30
    
You are correct about the writelist, but it is only ever dealing with one socket in this case. I'll check out the select operation on the sender side though just incase. –  Adam Cobb Mar 31 '11 at 14:31
    
If I were looking at this problem, because of my vague memory, I would eliminate this possibility. I am just sharing this vague hunch with you. (Also I have edited the answer since you read it.) –  Paul Ruane Mar 31 '11 at 14:31
    
You're definitely correct about the whole select code on the sender side, most of that readyToWrite stuff is messy and isn't even required at all in this case as i'm only dealing with the one socket. But I don't think there's any errors as such in this area as the send operation does appear to succeed, as in no SocketExceptions are thrown. –  Adam Cobb Mar 31 '11 at 14:38
    
Have you tried passing in a copy of the stream list as an error list? It would make me happy if you could eliminate this possibility. Other than that I have nothing! :) –  Paul Ruane Mar 31 '11 at 14:43

That's nicely odd. Please consider using WireShark to trace the messages and see where they're going. Unless I'm missing something obvious, I find it difficult to understand why the messages believe that they were received but really haven't. Could the client be waiting?

try int.MaxValue instead of 120000000

share|improve this answer
    
The messages are actually being sent on localhost as it's another executable receiving them on the same machine. So can't use Wireshark. However I used a localhost trace tool and as I say, I discovered that the other end is recieving the messages at that level, but the select is coming back and saying there's nothing to read... –  Adam Cobb Mar 31 '11 at 14:21
    
Also, the client code is well established code that is being used by many other applications. So i'm very confident that side is ok. And the select does pick up that theres something to read eventually, it's just the delay i'm not understanding. –  Adam Cobb Mar 31 '11 at 14:24

What does your client code look like?

Normally, I'd say that since you are running you are only sending messages locally the behavior you are seeing is almost definitely caused by Nagle's Algorithm, but setting the NoDelay property disables that.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah the NoDelay option is definitely set now and sadly no effect. –  Adam Cobb Mar 31 '11 at 14:59
    
My client code is actually C++ (that shouldn't make any difference though) here's a snippit, infact I can't paste it into a comment (too much) - it's basically a while loop on a simple call to Select(1, true), if it returns 1 then the code sets a readyToRead flag and attempts a read() on the socket... –  Adam Cobb Mar 31 '11 at 15:00
    
Added receiving side code to the question... –  Adam Cobb Mar 31 '11 at 15:14
    
Thanks! Can you also add in the body of your C++ socket class's select and read functions? –  Andrew Khosravian Mar 31 '11 at 15:17
    
FWIW, this could likely be solved by changing how you are sending queued data. Since TCP is a stream protocol from the perspective of the receiver calling send once with a large payload will look the same as calling send repeatedly with smaller amounts of data. –  Andrew Khosravian Mar 31 '11 at 15:19
up vote 0 down vote accepted

My mistake, appears that it was an issue with a blocking read in the end.

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