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Say I have a string: Hey what's up @dude, @how's it going?

I'd like to remove all the characters before@how's.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

or with the regex:

str = "Hey what's up @dude, @how's it going?"
str.gsub!(/.*?(?=@how)/im, "") #=> "@how's it going?"

you can read about lookaround at here

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Considering that it could be in any case variation of @how (e.g. @How, @HOW, @HoW etc), could it be done like this: str.gsub(/.*?(?=@[Hh][Oo][Ww])/, "")? –  oxo Mar 31 '11 at 14:39
2  
sure, fixed. (/i have been added) –  Vasiliy Ermolovich Mar 31 '11 at 14:44
1  
No need for gsub! when sub! will do, right? Also note (per my answer) that you need the \A anchor and/or m flag in case the string has a newline before the text to match. –  Phrogz Mar 31 '11 at 20:14
    
Thanks! Sorry, I don't know the difference between gsub and sub. Could you explain it? –  Vasiliy Ermolovich Mar 31 '11 at 20:41

Use String#slice

s = "Hey what's up @dude, @how's it going?"
s.slice(s.index("@how")..-1)
# => "@how's it going?"
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+1 very clean. Aren't the indices off though? Shouldn't it be 0..s.index("@how")? –  McStretch Mar 31 '11 at 14:23
2  
He wants to strip everything before the match, that is the same to say "keep everything after the match". –  Simone Carletti Mar 31 '11 at 14:25
    
Oh whoops, I misunderstood how splice worked. I thought it removed the string in place, like a delete method. I didn't realize it returned the spliced text for use. –  McStretch Mar 31 '11 at 14:40
    
I commented below to another answer, but I was wondering that since it could be in any case variation of @how (e.g. @How, @HOW, @HoW etc), could it be done like this: str.slice(str.index("@[Hh][Oo][Ww]")..-1) –  oxo Mar 31 '11 at 14:41
    
If the search string doesn't appear, the index will return nil. So he should either check for nil before doing the slice, or plan to rescue the error that comes from passing an index of nil to slice. –  Nathan Long Mar 31 '11 at 14:41

There are literally tens of ways of doing this. Here are the ones I would use:

If you want to preserve the original string:

str = "Hey what's up @dude, @how's it going?"
str2 = str[/@how's.+/mi]
p str, str2
#=> "Hey what's up @dude, @how's it going?"
#=> "@how's it going?"

If you want to mutate the original string:

str = "Hey what's up @dude, @how's it going?"
str[/\A.+?(?=@how's)/mi] = ''
p str
#=> "@how's it going?"

...or...

str = "Hey what's up @dude, @how's it going?"
str.sub! /\A.+?(?=@how's)/mi, ''
p str
#=> "@how's it going?"

You need the \A to anchor at the start of the string, and the m flag to ensure that you are matching across multiple lines.

Perhaps simplest of all for mutating the original:

str = "Hey what's up @dude, @how's it going?"
str.replace str[/@how's.+/mi]
p str
#=> "@how's it going?"
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String#slice and String#index work fine but will blow up with ArgumentError: bad value for range if the needle is not in the haystack.

Using String#partition or String#rpartition might work better in that case:

s.partition "@how's"
# => ["Hey what's up @dude, ", "@how's", " it going?"]
s.partition "not there"
# => ["Hey what's up @dude, @how's it going?", "", ""]
s.rpartition "not there"
# => ["", "", "Hey what's up @dude, @how's it going?"]
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An easy way to get only the part you are interested in.

>> s="Hey what's up @dude, @how's it going?"
=> "Hey what's up @dude, @how's it going?"
>> s[/@how.*$/i]
=> "@how's it going?"

If you really need to change the string object, you could always do s=s[...].

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>> "Hey what's up @dude, @how's it going?".partition("@how's")[-2..-1].join
=> "@how's it going?"

Case insensitive

>> "Hey what's up @dude, @HoW's it going?".partition(/@how's/i)[-2..-1].join
=> "@HoW's it going?"

Or using scan()

>> "Hey what's up @dude, @HoW's it going?".scan(/@how's.*/i)[0]
=> "@HoW's it going?"
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You need a m flag on that last regex to match any newlines that may follow. –  Phrogz Mar 31 '11 at 20:19

You can also directly call [] also on a string(same as slice)

s = "Hey what's up @dude, @how's it going?"
start_index = s.downcase.index("@how")
start_index ? s[start_index..-1] : ""
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