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Short example:

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    int n;
    [&](){n = 10;}();             // OK
    [=]() mutable {n = 20;}();    // OK
    // [=](){n = 10;}();          // Error: a by-value capture cannot be modified in a non-mutable lambda
    std::cout << n << "\n";       // "10"
}

The question: Why do we need the mutable keyword? It's quite different from traditional parameter passing to named functions. What's the rationale behind?

I was under the impression that the whole point of capture-by-value is to allow the user to change the temporary -- otherwise I'm almost always better off using capture-by-reference, aren't I?

Any enlightenments?

(I'm using MSVC2010 by the way. AFAIK this should be standard)

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42  
Good question; although I'm glad something is finally const by default! –  xtofl Mar 31 '11 at 15:11
3  
Not an answer, but I think this is a sensible thing: if you take something by value, you shouldn't be changing it just to save you 1 copy to a local variable. At least you won't make the mistake of changing n by replacing = with &. –  stefaanv Mar 31 '11 at 15:22
    
I absolutely agree with stefaanv. The rationale is probably that they intended the language to be more straightforward to learn. A beginner might attempt to implement a swap function lambda with value capturing. This is what's commonly referred to as the principle of least surprise. –  Tamás Szelei Mar 31 '11 at 15:30
3  
@xtofl: Not sure it's good, when everything else is not const by default. –  kizzx2 Mar 31 '11 at 15:33
3  
@Tamás Szelei: Not to start an argument, but IMHO the concept "easy to learn" has no place in the C++ language, especially in modern days. Anyway :P –  kizzx2 Mar 31 '11 at 15:35

8 Answers 8

up vote 81 down vote accepted

It requires mutable because by default, a function object should produce the same result every time it's called. This is the difference between an object orientated function and a function using a global variable, effectively.

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21  
+1 for a function object should produce the same result every time it's called which is imho the key point. –  Martin Ba Apr 1 '11 at 18:11
2  
This is a good point. I totally agree. In C++0x though, I don't quite see how the default helps enforce the above. Consider I am on the receiving end of the lambda, e.g. I am void f(const std::function<int(int)> g). How am I guaranteed that g is actually referentially transparent? g's supplier might have used mutable anyway. So I won't know. On the other hand, if the default is non-const, and people must add const instead of mutable to function objects, the compiler can actually enforce the const std::function<int(int)> part and now f can assume that g is const, no? –  kizzx2 Apr 1 '11 at 18:34
    
This answer is accepted as I think it most closely answers the why (as in rationale) part. –  kizzx2 Apr 1 '11 at 18:37
3  
@kizzx2: In C++, nothing is enforced, only suggested. As per usual, if you do something stupid (documented requirement for referential transparency and then pass non-referentially-transparent function), you get whatever comes to you. –  Puppy Nov 24 '11 at 22:18

I was under the impression that the whole point of capture-by-value is to allow the user to change the temporary -- otherwise I'm almost always better off using capture-by-reference, aren't I?

The question is, is it "almost"? A frequent use-case appears to be to return or pass lambdas:

void registerCallback(std::function<void()> f) { /* ... */ }

void doSomething() {
  std::string name = receiveName();
  registerCallback([name]{ /* do something with name */ });
}

I think that mutable isn't a case of "almost". I consider "capture-by-value" like "allow me to use its value after the captured entity dies" rather than "allow me to change a copy of it". But perhaps this can be argued.

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1  
Good example. This is a very strong use-case for the use of capture-by-value. But why does it default to const? What purpose does it achieve? mutable seems out of place here, when const is not the default in "almost" (:P) everything else of the language. –  kizzx2 Mar 31 '11 at 15:32
5  
@kizzx2: I wish const was the default, at least people would be forced to consider const-correctness :/ –  Matthieu M. Mar 31 '11 at 15:44
    
@kizzx2 looking into the lambda papers, it appears to me they make it default to const so they could call it whether or not the lambda object is const. For example they could pass it to a function taking a std::function<void()> const&. To allow the lambda change its captured copies, in the initial papers the data members of the closure were defined mutable internally automatically. Now you have to manually put mutable in the lambda expression. I haven't found a detailed rationale though. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Mar 31 '11 at 16:02
2  
See open-std.org/JTC1/SC22/WG21/docs/papers/2008/n2651.pdf for some details. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Mar 31 '11 at 16:08
3  
At this point, to me, the "real" answer/rationale seems to be "they failed to work around an implementation detail" :/ –  kizzx2 Mar 31 '11 at 16:25

Your code is almost equivalent to this:

#include <iostream>

class unnamed1
{
    int& n;
public:
    unnamed1(int& N) : n(N) {}

    /* OK. Your this is const but you don't modify the "n" reference,
    but the value pointed by it. You wouldn't be able to modify a reference
    anyway even if your operator() was mutable. When you assign a reference
    it will always point to the same var.
    */
    void operator()() const {n = 10;}
};

class unnamed2
{
    int n;
public:
    unnamed2(int N) : n(N) {}

    /* OK. Your this pointer is not const (since your operator() is "mutable" instead of const).
    So you can modify the "n" member. */
    void operator()() {n = 20;}
};

class unnamed3
{
    int n;
public:
    unnamed3(int N) : n(N) {}

    /* BAD. Your this is const so you can't modify the "n" member. */
    void operator()() const {n = 10;}
};

int main()
{
    int n;
    unnamed1 u1(n); u1();    // OK
    unnamed2 u2(n); u2();    // OK
    //unnamed3 u3(n); u3();  // Error
    std::cout << n << "\n";  // "10"
}

So you could think of lambdas as generating a class with operator() that defaults to const unless you say that it is mutable.

You can also think of all the variables captured inside [] (explicitly or implicitly) as members of that class: copies of the objects for [=] or references to the objects for [&]. They are initialized when you declare your lambda as if there was a hidden constructor.

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2  
I think this answer should be the best one! –  xmllmx Aug 10 '13 at 14:59

See this draft, under 5.1.2 [expr.prim.lambda], subclause 5:

The closure type for a lambda-expression has a public inline function call operator (13.5.4) whose parameters and return type are described by the lambda-expression’s parameter-declaration-clause and trailingreturn- type respectively. This function call operator is declared const (9.3.1) if and only if the lambdaexpression’s parameter-declaration-clause is not followed by mutable.

Edit on litb's comment: Maybe they thought of capture-by-value so that outside changes to the variables aren't reflected inside the lambda? References work both ways, so that's my explanation. Don't know if it's any good though.

Edit on kizzx2's comment: The most times when a lambda is to be used is as a functor for algorithms. The default constness lets it be used in a constant environment, just like normal const-qualified functions can be used there, but non-const-qualified ones can't. Maybe they just thought to make it more intuitive for those cases, who know what goes on in their mind. :)

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It's the standard, but why did they write it this way? –  kizzx2 Mar 31 '11 at 15:38
    
@kizzx2: My explanation is directly under that quote. :) It relates a bit to what litb says about the lifetime of the captured objects, but also goes a little further. –  Xeo Mar 31 '11 at 15:41
    
@Xeo: Oh yes, I missed that :P It's also another good explanation for a good use of capture-by-value. But why should it be const by default? I already got a new copy, it seems strange not to let me change it -- especially it's not something principally wrong with it -- they just want me to add mutable. –  kizzx2 Mar 31 '11 at 15:44
    
@kizzx2: See my edit, maybe that makes any sense. :| –  Xeo Mar 31 '11 at 15:49
1  
@kizzx2 - If we could start all over again, we would probably have var as a keyword to allow change and constant being the default for everything else. Now we don't, so we have to live with that. IMO, C++2011 came out pretty well, considering everything. –  Bo Persson Mar 31 '11 at 17:21

You need to think what is the closure type of your Lambda function. Every time you declare a Lambda expression, the compiler creates a closure type, which is nothing less than an unnamed class declaration with attributes (environment where the Lambda expression where declared) and the function call ::operator() implemented. When you capture a variable using copy-by-value, the compiler will create a new const attribute in the closure type, so you can't change it inside the Lambda expression because it is a "read-only" attribute, that's the reason they call it a "closure", because in some way, you are closing your Lambda expression by copying the variables from upper scope into the Lambda scope. When you use the keyword mutable, the captured entity will became a non-const attribute of your closure type. This is what causes the changes done in the mutable variable captured by value, to not be propagated to upper scope, but keep inside the stateful Lambda. Always try to imagine the resulting closure type of your Lambda expression, that helped me a lot, and I hope it can help you too.

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FWIW, Herb Sutter, a well-known member of the C++ standardization committee, provides a different answer to that question in Lambda Correctness and Usability Issues:

Consider this straw man example, where the programmer captures a local variable by value and tries to modify the captured value (which is a member variable of the lambda object):

int val = 0;
auto x = [=](item e)            // look ma, [=] means explicit copy
            { use(e,++val); };  // error: count is const, need ‘mutable’
auto y = [val](item e)          // darnit, I really can’t get more explicit
            { use(e,++val); };  // same error: count is const, need ‘mutable’

This feature appears to have been added out of a concern that the user might not realize he got a copy, and in particular that since lambdas are copyable he might be changing a different lambda’s copy.

His paper is about why this should be changed in C++14. It is short, well written, worth reading if you want to know "what's on [committee member] minds" with regards to this particular feature.

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+1 thanks for talking about what c++14 has proposed. I always like knowing what is on the horizon and why. –  Buttink Sep 29 at 15:52

I was under the impression that the whole point of capture-by-value is to allow the user to change the temporary -- otherwise I'm almost always better off using capture-by-reference, aren't I?

n is not a temporary. n is a member of the lambda-function-object that you crete with the lambda expression. The default expectation is that calling your lambda does not modify its state, therefore it is const to prevent you from accidentally modifying n.

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1  
The whole lambda object is a temporary, its members also have temporary lifetime. –  Ben Voigt Jan 14 at 21:11
    
@Ben : IIRC, I was referring to the issue that when someone says "temporary", I understand it to mean unnamed temporary object, which the lambda itself is, but it's members are not. And also that from "inside" the lambda, it doesn't really matter whether the lambda itself is temporary. Re-reading the question though it would appear that OP just meant to say the "n inside the lambda" when he said "temporary". –  Martin Ba Jan 15 at 10:52

There is now a proposal to alleviate the need for mutable in lambda declarations: n3424

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Any information on what came of that? I personally think it's a bad idea, since the new "capture of arbitrary expressions" smooths out most of the pain points. –  Ben Voigt Oct 4 '13 at 16:47
    
@BenVoigt Yeah it seems like a change for change's sake. –  Miles Rout Jun 14 at 11:24
    
@BenVoigt Although to be fair, I expect there are probably many C++ developers that don't know that mutable is even a keyword in C++. –  Miles Rout Jun 14 at 11:25

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