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Hello I have written a perl script that takes port scans that i had saved in a text file and out put them to Microsoft Excel. Now my boss wants it to output in in excel in csv format such as

 Server, port, protocol, state, service, 
 69.25.194.2,    25,   tcp, open,  smtp

I would like to have all the IP's in column A, ports in columns B and so forth. I guess I could use matching regular expressions but I'm new to perl and having trouble doing this Can you guys help me.

Here is my Code this outputs the text file to Excel can I modify this format the excel file in the format that I want it in.

$input = `Cat /cygdrive/c/Windows/System32/test11.txt | grep -v 'SYN Stealth'`;
chomp input;
$output =" /cygdrive/c/Users/bpaul/Desktop/194.csv ";
if (! -e "$output")
{
`touch $output`;
}
open (OUTPUTFILE, ">$output") || die "Can't Open file $output";
print OUTPUTFILE "$input\n";
close (OUTPUTFILE);

Here is a piece of my file

 Nmap scan report for 69.25.194.2 Host is up (0.072s latency). 
 Not shown: 9992 filtered ports 
 PORT STATE SERVICE 
 25/tcp open smtp
 80/tcp open http
 82/tcp open xfer
 443/tcp open
 https 4443/tcp closed
 pharos 5666/tcp closed
 nrpe 8080/tcp closed
 http-proxy 9443/tcp closed tungsten-https
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1  
Your use of backticks here is very odd; for one thing, it's completely unnecessary to touch an non-existing file before opening it for overwriting; it will be created automatically. And grep doesn't need anything piped to it; it knows how to read from files (and you should almost certainly be doing the grepping from within perl itself). –  Wooble Mar 31 '11 at 15:25

1 Answer 1

NMap has a grep-able output format which will output each host on a single line and provides a comma and slash delimited list of open ports. Use nmap -oG on the command line or check the NMap man page for more output types. This page seems like a pretty good illustration of manipulating the output once you get it.

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