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I've ran into an issue where code classes outside of my control use strings that are null so when they become referenced for example, "string.Length", causes an error. Rather than write a check for the possible 100 fields on average, with nested classes, I thought maybe I could create something easier. I had an idea...

If you've done any research into copying objects PropertyCopy, along with a few others, is an extremely common find. I currently use the class mentioned above. I was wondering if it could be modified to simply go: if stringPropertyValue is null then set stringPropertyValue equal to string.Empty.

My understanding is limited. I've been doing research to solve my issue but no real good ideas. Can my idea work? Is there a better way? How would it be done if it could?

Update:

Based on a response below I have created this class which I am currently going to use.

public static void DenullifyStringsToEmpty<T>(this T instance)
    {
        //handle properties
        foreach (var filteredProperties in instance.GetType().GetProperties().Where(p =>
            (p.PropertyType.IsClass || p.PropertyType.IsInterface || p.PropertyType == typeof(string))))
        {
            if (filteredProperties.PropertyType == typeof(string))
            {
                if (filteredProperties.GetValue(instance, null) == null)
                {
                    filteredProperties.SetValue(instance, string.Empty, null);
                }
            }
            else
            {
                filteredProperties.GetValue(instance, null).DenullifyStringsToEmpty();
            }
        }

        //handle fields
        foreach (var filteredFields in instance.GetType().GetFields().Where(f =>
            (f.FieldType.IsClass || f.FieldType.IsInterface || f.FieldType == typeof(string))))
        {
            if (filteredFields.FieldType == typeof(string))
            {
                if (filteredFields.GetValue(instance) == null)
                {
                    filteredFields.SetValue(instance, string.Empty);
                }
            }
            else
            {
                filteredFields.GetValue(instance).DenullifyStringsToEmpty();
            }
        }
    }

I know that reflection can be heavy and until we have an issue I think this solution will work great. This is an extension (thanks to the comments below).

Thanks for the input.

share|improve this question
    
100+ fields and properties per class, plus you're using code that's outside your control which doesn't check for null values? I do not envy your job. –  StriplingWarrior Mar 31 '11 at 19:55
    
@StriplingWarrior With the three current objects I am working with I have about 90/45/60 in terms of the number of properties. As I send them out (or back depending on how you look at it) the initialization values are null so code errors. In an attempt to reduce the headache of coding every line... I thought a creative solution was in order. Plus, in the future, there will be more (bigger) objects to deal with. I work in health care which has a lot of little fields to indicate different things. –  WaffleTop Mar 31 '11 at 20:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Couldn't you just create a simple extension method?

public static string NullToEmpty(this string possibleNullString)
{
    return possibleNullString ?? string.Empty;
}

Use this, when accessing the string properties of that third party classes, e.g.:

var length = instanceOfThirdPartyClass.StringProperty.NullToEmpty().Length;

Update:
Now that I understand what you want ;-)
Have a look at this:

public static void DenullStringProperties<T>(this T instance)
{
    foreach(var propertyInfo in instance.GetType().GetProperties().
                                   Where(p => p.PropertyType == typeof(string))
    {
        var value = propertyInfo.GetValue(instance, null);
        if(value == null)
            value = string.Empty;
        propertyInfo.SetValue(instance, value, null);
    }
}

You could call it like this:

instanceOfThirdPartyClass.DenullStringProperties();

But I still think you should go with the first approach, because I really don't see a reason to do such heavy lifting during runtime (reflection isn't cheap), just because you are lazy about typing during development :) Additionally, you can't be sure that the properties will stay non null after you have called DenullStringProperties (multi-threading, calls to methods of the object, ...). The first approach checks for null and handles it just as it is needed.

share|improve this answer
    
I was hoping to be able to do something like "SetNullStringsToEmpty(object)" otherwise I must code a line for each of the 100+ fields. I'd like to avoid that if possible. –  WaffleTop Mar 31 '11 at 15:30
2  
You might be able to do something reflectively on an entire object, but really, coding the solution per-field is the "best" way as long as you encapsulate the logic such as in the extension method, so it can change if you really need it to. –  KeithS Mar 31 '11 at 15:35
    
@WaffleTop: Updated my answer. Besides the update to show you a way to do what you want, I agree with @KeithS. –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 31 '11 at 15:37
    
@Daniel Hilgarth @KeithS I was actually already trying the second method but had not made it an extension. Good idea. Also, so I can learn, why do you recommend the first approach? –  WaffleTop Mar 31 '11 at 15:52
    
@WaffleTop: I recommend the first method, because I really don't see a reason to do such heavy lifting during runtime (reflection isn't cheap), just because you are lazy about typing during development :) Additionally, you can't be sure that the properties will stay non null after you have called DenullStringProperties. The first approach checks for null and handles it just as it is needed. –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 31 '11 at 15:55

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