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Can someone please help me understand the following Morris inorder tree traversal algorithm without using stacks or recursion ? I was trying to understand how it works, but its just escaping me.

 1. Initialize current as root
 2. While current is not NULL
  If current does not have left child     
   a. Print current’s data
   b. Go to the right, i.e., current = current->right
  Else
   a. In current's left subtree, make current the right child of the rightmost node
   b. Go to this left child, i.e., current = current->left

I understand the tree is modified in a way that the current node, is made the right child of the max node in right subtree and use this property for inorder traversal. But beyond that, I'm lost.

EDIT: Found this accompanying c++ code. I was having a hard time to understand how the tree is restored after it is modified. The magic lies in else clause, which is hit once the right leaf is modified. See code for details:

/* Function to traverse binary tree without recursion and
   without stack */
void MorrisTraversal(struct tNode *root)
{
  struct tNode *current,*pre;

  if(root == NULL)
     return; 

  current = root;
  while(current != NULL)
  {
    if(current->left == NULL)
    {
      printf(" %d ", current->data);
      current = current->right;
    }
    else
    {
      /* Find the inorder predecessor of current */
      pre = current->left;
      while(pre->right != NULL && pre->right != current)
        pre = pre->right;

      /* Make current as right child of its inorder predecessor */
      if(pre->right == NULL)
      {
        pre->right = current;
        current = current->left;
      }

     // MAGIC OF RESTORING the Tree happens here: 
      /* Revert the changes made in if part to restore the original
        tree i.e., fix the right child of predecssor */
      else
      {
        pre->right = NULL;
        printf(" %d ",current->data);
        current = current->right;
      } /* End of if condition pre->right == NULL */
    } /* End of if condition current->left == NULL*/
  } /* End of while */
}
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5  
I'd never heard of this algorithm before. Quite elegant! –  larsmans Mar 31 '11 at 21:42
    
I thought it might be useful to indicate the source of the pseudo-code + code (presumably). –  Dukeling May 30 at 22:42
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2 Answers 2

up vote 72 down vote accepted

If I am reading the algorithm right, this should be an example of how it works:

     X
   /   \
  Y     Z
 / \   / \
A   B C   D

First, X is the root, so it is initialized as current. X has a left child, so X is made the rightmost right child of X's left subtree -- the immediate predecessor to X in an inorder traversal. So X is made the right child of B, then current is set to Y. The tree now looks like this:

    Y
   / \
  A   B
       \
        X
       / \
     (Y)  Z
         / \
        C   D

(Y) above refers to Y and all of its children, which are omitted for recursion issues. The important part is listed anyway. Now that the tree has a link back to X, the traversal continues...

 A
  \
   Y
  / \
(A)  B
      \
       X
      / \
    (Y)  Z
        / \
       C   D

Then A is outputted, because it has no left child, and current is returned to Y, which was made A's right child in the previous iteration. On the next iteration, Y has both children. However, the dual-condition of the loop makes it stop when it reaches itself, which is an indication that it's left subtree has already been traversed. So, it prints itself, and continues with its right subtree, which is B.

B prints itself, and then current becomes X, which goes through the same checking process as Y did, also realizing that its left subtree has been traversed, continuing with the Z. The rest of the tree follows the same pattern.

No recursion is necessary, because instead of relying on backtracking through a stack, a link back to the root of the (sub)tree is moved to the point at which it would be accessed in a recursive inorder tree traversal algorithm anyway -- after its left subtree has finished.

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1  
Thanks for the explanation. The left child is not severed, instead the tree is restored later on by severing the new right child that is added to the rightmost leaf for the purpose of traversal. See my updated post with the code. –  brainydexter Mar 31 '11 at 22:26
4  
+1 Nice sketch with nice explanation. –  Nawaz Mar 16 '12 at 5:31
    
Nice sketch, but I still don't understand the while loop condition. Why is checking for pre->right != current necessary? –  No_name Mar 12 '13 at 1:18
    
very clear explanations! –  galactica Jun 3 '13 at 18:47
    
I don't see why this works. After you print A, then Y becomes the root, and you still have A as the left child. Thus, we are in the same situation as before. And we repeat A. In fact, it looks like an infinite loop. –  user678392 Oct 21 '13 at 21:51
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I hope the pseudo-code below is more revealing:

node = root
while node != null
    if node.left == null
        visit the node
        node = node.right
    else
        let pred_node be the inorder predecessor of node
        if pred_node.right == null /* create threading in the binary tree */
            pred_node.right = node
            node = node.left
        else         /* remove threading from the binary tree */
            pred_node.right = null 
            visit the node
            node = node.right

Referring to the C++ code in the question, the inner while loop finds the in-order predecessor of the current node. In a standard binary tree, the right child of the predecessor must be null, while in the threaded version the right child must point to the current node. If the right child is null, it is set to the current node, effectively creating the threading, which is used as a returning point that would otherwise have to be on stored, usually on a stack. If the right child is not null, then the algorithm makes sure that the original tree is restored, and then continues traversal in the right subtree (in this case it is known that the left subtree was visited).

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