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We have n variables X = {x1,x2,...xn} they are not in any structures whatsoever.

In python for example I can do that: if (x1 == x2 == x3 == xn):

In java I must do: if((x1 == x2) && (x2 == x3) && (x3 == xn)):

Do you know a simple way to improve this syntax? (Imagine very long variable name and lot of them)

Thanks.

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4  
Not what you're asking, but this cries out for some kind of data structure instead of a bunch of independent variables. –  Tom Zych Mar 31 '11 at 16:25
    
too bad. I'll look into that. Thanks! –  Pierre Guilbert Mar 31 '11 at 16:29
    
in java, (x1 == x2 == x3 == x4) will returnTest.java:8: incomparable types: boolean and int System.out.println(x1 == x2 == x3 == x4); ^ Test.java:8: incomparable types: boolean and int System.out.println(x1 == x2 == x3 == x4); –  Leo Izen Mar 31 '11 at 16:29
    
I said in python we can do that (x1 == blabla) what's your point Leo? –  Pierre Guilbert Mar 31 '11 at 16:33
4  
@Leo that's even more dangerous if you're trying to do that with a set of booleans. If x1,x2,x3,x4 are booleans, they will compile but have a silent bug. x1 == x2 == x3 says (x1 == x2) == x3 whhich is VERY different than what we want! –  corsiKa Mar 31 '11 at 16:33

7 Answers 7

up vote 17 down vote accepted

If you have lots of these variables, have you considered putting them in a collection instead of having them as separate variables? There are various options at that point.

If you find yourself doing this a lot, you might want to write helper methods, possibly using varargs syntax. For example:

public static boolean areAllEqual(int... values)
{
    if (values.length == 0)
    {
        return true; // Alternative below
    }
    int checkValue = values[0];
    for (int i = 1; i < values.length; i++)
    {
        if (values[i] != checkValue)
        {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

An alternative as presented by glowcoder is to force there to be at least one value:

public static boolean areAllEqual(int checkValue, int... otherValues)
{
    for (int value : otherValues)
    {
        if (value != checkValue)
        {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

In either case, use with:

if (HelperClass.areAllEqual(x1, x2, x3, x4, x5))
{
    ...
}
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I think areAllTheSame() should return true. Currently it will choke on values[0] i suppose. –  aioobe Mar 31 '11 at 16:38
    
@aioobe: I've presented two options now... –  Jon Skeet Mar 31 '11 at 16:42
    
JOn Skeet to the rescue Too Good +1 –  Deepak Mar 31 '11 at 17:35
    
You could also use LINQ here instead of the for loop in the case where you force there to be at least one value: return otherValues.All(v => v.Equals(checkValue)); or invert it with return !otherValues.Any(v => v != checkValue); Edit: Apologies - realise you can't use LINQ as I didn't spot the java tag here. –  John Pappin Apr 1 '11 at 11:29

You could create a utility method like this:

public boolean allEqual(Object... objs) {
    if(objs.length < 2) return true; // 0 or 1 objects are all equal
    Object key = objs[0]; // pick one
    for(Object o : objs) if(!o.equals(key)) return false;
    return true;
}

Another option would be

public boolean allEqual(Object key, Object... objs) {
    for(Object o : objs) if(!o.equals(key)) return false;
    return true;
}

To simplify a lot of boilerplate logic. Then just go

if(allEqual(x,x1,x2,x3))

Obviously the two are mutually exclusive (they are signaturely ambigous) but you could have allEqual and allEqualWithKey

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2  
@glowcoder: I considered this form too... but boxing all the values could end up being a bit painful. I think for the sake of a few overloads, I'd treat each primitive type separately. –  Jon Skeet Mar 31 '11 at 16:32
    
+1 @Jon, though this has the benefit of being more reusable. Depends on the application, I suppose. –  Pops Mar 31 '11 at 16:35
    
@Lord Torgamus: I'd be surprised to see this required for more than a few types, to be honest. I do like the "force at least one argument" bit though :) –  Jon Skeet Mar 31 '11 at 16:37
    
Thank you all for your time! btw my objects are ArrayLists and I'm checking their size. I've learn more in these last 10 minutes than during the last hour, wondering the web for answers. Thank you again! –  Pierre Guilbert Mar 31 '11 at 16:50
1  
@Jon I can see the code review now. "What's this anonymous Comparator object and what does it do?" Oh that defines the comparison for the allEqual utility. "What does that do?" Oh it saves us from writing boilerplate code! –  corsiKa Mar 31 '11 at 17:12

Similar to @Jon's solution but shorter.

public static boolean areAllTheSame(int value, int... values) {
    for (int i: values) if(value != i) return false;
    return true;
}
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2  
I like this one! :) –  Pierre Guilbert Mar 31 '11 at 16:42
    
Half of the reason that's shorter is putting lots of stuff on one line and not using braces - which I'd never do in production code. I've edited in the "force at least one argument" version into my code though, as originally shown by glowcoder. –  Jon Skeet Mar 31 '11 at 16:43
    
@Jon I wrote this before I saw your edit. I am not in favour of padding out the code with lots of { } on new lines. However I would only use one liners line this for the simplest of operations. –  Peter Lawrey Mar 31 '11 at 16:53
1  
It's not "padding out code" - it's keeping things absolutely clear, IMO. Having been bitten by an "indentation was lying, that's an if statement with a single statement after it, then another statement" bug once, I'm not about to repeat the same mistake. Of course, you could put the open brace at the end of the leading line... –  Jon Skeet Mar 31 '11 at 16:57
    
@Jon I tend to use the IDE to highlight when the identation is lying. This is feature is turned on for all our developers. ;) I agree that; you should do what you believe is clearest. I tend to find the less symbols the better (although I prefer meaningful names for things) –  Peter Lawrey Mar 31 '11 at 17:00

You could write a method that makes this look less cumbersome:

boolean areAllEqual(Object... values) {
    if (values.length < 2) {
        return true;
    }

    for (int i = 1; i < values.length; i++) {
        if (!values[i].equals(values[0])) {
            return false;
        }
    }

    return true;
}

Use it like this:

if (areAllEqual(x1, x2, x3, x4, x5)) {
    // do something
}

edit Too slow...! :-(

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Well thank you a lot :) the spirit was there! –  Pierre Guilbert Mar 31 '11 at 16:36

Unfortunately, no, there's no syntactic sugar available. This is a common gripe about Java.

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2  
Can't say I've ever heard of it before, so I can't imagine it's that common... –  Jon Skeet Mar 31 '11 at 16:25
1  
Hm, perhaps it was only common at my university then? Thanks for the alternate point of view, @Jon. –  Pops Mar 31 '11 at 16:26
1  
Never needed this in several years of Java. Cute, but there are many other places the syntax drive me more crazy :) –  bwawok Mar 31 '11 at 16:29
    
If I had to choose between this and closures... :) –  corsiKa Mar 31 '11 at 16:31
1  
For the downvoter, and future downvoters: I considered deleting this post, but the title and body both specifically ask about syntax, not a clever algorithm for checking equality. The original title was slightly more explicit, if anything. –  Pops Mar 31 '11 at 20:06

If you don't like typing, you could lose the nested paretheses:

if(x1 == x2 && x2 == x3 && x3 == xn);
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You're right sorry. I misinterpreted operator precedence link –  Pierre Guilbert Mar 31 '11 at 16:44

Another quick way to achieve this would be via the array -> List -> HashSet conversion route, as in:

Standard Java:

if(new HashSet<Object>(Arrays.asList(x1, x2, x3, x4, x5)).size() == 1) {

}

Google Guava:

if(Sets.newHashSet(Ints.asList(x1, x2, x3, x4, x5)).size() == 1) {

}

The aforementioned solution doesn't look too clean in it's own right, though, so it should definitely be isolated into a separate utility method with a sensible name (in which case you'd probably be better off with Peter Lawrey's or Jon Skeet's solution in the first place).

I'd also expect this approach to be associated with at least a tiny performance hit, since it's clear that multiple Collections have to be instantiated & populated.

So to reiterate - only use this solution if you are hell-bent on hitting a one-liner.

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