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To start you probably know that const can be used to make either an object's data or a pointer not modifiable or both.

const Object* obj; // can't change data
Object* const obj; // can't change pointer
const Object* const obj; // can't change data or pointer

However you can also use the syntax:

Object const *obj; // same as const Object* obj;

The only thing that seems to matter is which side of the asterisk you put the const keyword. Personally I prefer to put const on the left of the type to specify it's data is not modifiable as I find it reads better in my left-to-right mindset but which syntax came first?

More importantly why is there two correct ways of specifying const data and in what situation would you prefer or need one over the other if any?

Edit:

So it sounds like this was an arbitrary decision when the standard for how compilers should interpret things was drafted long before I was born. Since const is applied to what is to the left of the keyword (by default?) I guess they figured there was no harm in adding "shortcuts" to apply keywords and type qualifiers in other ways at least until such a time as the declaration changes by parsing a * or & ...

This was the case in C as well then I'm assuming?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 16 down vote accepted

"why is there two correct ways of specifying const data and in what situation would you prefer or need one over the other if any?"

Essentially, the reason that the position of const within specifiers prior to an asterisk does not matter is that the C grammar was defined that way by Kernighan and Ritchie.

The reason they defined the grammar in this way was likely that their C compiler parsed input from left-to-right and finished processing each token as it consumed that. Consuming the * token changes the state of the current declaration to a pointer type. Encountering const after * means the const qualifier is applied to a pointer declaration; encountering it prior to the * means the qualifier is applied to the data pointed to.

Because the semantic meaning does not change if the const qualifier appears before or after the type specifiers, it is accepted either way.

A similar sort of case arises when declaring function pointers, where:

void * function1(void) declares a function which returns void *,
void (* function2)(void) declares a function pointer to a function which returns void.

Again the thing to notice is that the language syntax supports a left-to-right parser.

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Who with the uncommented -1? –  Heath Hunnicutt Mar 31 '11 at 17:08
2  
Kernighan co-authored the book but wasn't involved in the design of C, just Ritchie. –  Tom Zych Sep 10 '11 at 0:36
    
@TomZych OMG, Till the time I was think both K&R wrote C, now you are saying K only write book of C not C? –  pranitkothari Aug 19 '13 at 11:57

The rule is:

const applies to the thing left of it. If there is nothing on the left then it applies to the thing right of it.

I prefer using const on the right of the thing to be const just because it is the "original" way const is defined.

But I think this is a very subjective point of view.

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3  
I prefer putting it on the left, but I think putting it on the right makes more sense. You generally read types in C++ from right-to-left, for example Object const * is a pointer to a const Object. If you put the const on the left, it would read as a pointer to an Object that is const, which doesn't really flow very well. –  Collin Dauphinee Mar 31 '11 at 16:54
    
There is no such "rule." Have you got any reference to something which claims there is such a "rule"? –  Heath Hunnicutt Mar 31 '11 at 16:56
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I'm under the impression that on the left is for human-style consistency with other kinds of C declarations (computer-wise it's not correct as const isn't a storage class, but people aren't parsers). –  geekosaur Mar 31 '11 at 17:09
    
@Heath I believe that is more of a guideline than a rule and I've heard it often as a way of remembering how the compiler will interpret it ... I understand how it works so I was only curious about the thought process behind the decision to support it both ways. –  AJG85 Mar 31 '11 at 17:10
    
@HeathHunnicutt the rule exists, but it is just a little more complicated: c-faq.com/decl/spiral.anderson.html –  imallett Sep 5 at 6:30

The order of the keywords in a declaration isn't all that fixed. There are many alternatives to "the one true order". Like this

int long const long unsigned volatile i = 0;

or should it be

volatile unsigned long long int const i = 0;

??

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3  
+1 for a totally confusing definition of a simple variable. :) –  Xeo Mar 31 '11 at 17:32
    
+1: excellent observation still –  AJG85 Mar 31 '11 at 17:34
    
Are these all legal? –  rubenvb May 19 '11 at 13:26
    
@rubenvb - Yes, unfortunately they are. The grammar just says that a decl-specifier-seq is a sequence of decl-specifiers. There is no order given by the grammar, and the number of occurances for each keyword is limited only by some semantic rules (you can have one const but two long :-) –  Bo Persson May 19 '11 at 13:39
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@rubenvb - Yes, unsigned is a type, the same as unsigned int and int unsigned. unsigned long is another type, the same as unsigned long int and int long unsigned. See the pattern? –  Bo Persson May 19 '11 at 14:41

I prefer the second syntax. It helps me keep track of 'what' is constant by reading the type declaration from right to left:

Object * const obj;        // read right-to-left:  const pointer to Object
Object const * obj;        // read right-to-left:  pointer to const Object
Object const * const obj;  // read right-to-left:  const pointer to const Object
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Exactly. A "constant pointer to a constant object" is Object const* const, not const const Object*. "const" cannot be on the left except in the special case where so many people absolutely love it. (See Heath above.) –  cdunn2001 Jan 21 at 4:26

The first rule is to use whichever format your local coding standards requires. After that: putting the const in front leads to no end of confusion when typedefs are involved, e.g.:

typedef int* IntPtr;
const IntPtr p1;   // same as int* const p1;

If your coding standard allows typedef's of pointers, then it really should insist on putting the const after the type. In every case but when applied to the type, const must follow what it applies to, so coherence also argues in favor of the const after. But local coding guidelines trump all of these; the difference isn't normally important enough to go back and change all of the existing code.

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I think that may highlight the reason why we don't have typedefs of pointers in our rather loosely defined standards at this shop. –  AJG85 Mar 31 '11 at 17:22
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My policy (when I get to decide alone) is to put the const after (for the sake of coherence) and to not use typedefs to pointers (or typedefs much in general):-). And BTW, string::iterator vs. string::const_iterator should probably be factored into your decision as well. (Just to confuse things:-). There is no right answer.) –  James Kanze Mar 31 '11 at 17:40
    
Ah yes I could have included the behavior of const std::string::const_iterator as well for good measure ;) –  AJG85 Mar 31 '11 at 20:28
    
This is a great example, and I agree with James Kanze. However, there is a use in typedeffing a pointer: When you might want to use a smart-point later. –  cdunn2001 Jan 21 at 4:29
1  
@ToddLehman You might not see the confusion, but most C++ programmers do, and systematically get it wrong (no doubt helped by things like std::vector<T>::const_iterator, where it isn't the iterator which is const, but what it is pointing to). –  James Kanze Aug 11 at 9:07

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