Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider this fragment of C++ code:

namespace
{
    void f()
    {
    }

    class A
    {
        void f()
        {
            ::f(); // VC++: error C2039: 'f' : is not a member of '`global namespace''
        }
    };
}

GCC compiles this just fine. Visual C++ 2008 fails to compile spitting out the C2039 error. Which one of these two compilers is correct here? Is there any way to reference that "global" f properly?

Edit: Zack suggested to try and it works with both compilers. Looks a bit weird to me.

namespace
{
    void f()
    {
    }

    class A
    {
        void f();
    };
}

void A::f()
{
    ::f();
}
share|improve this question
2  
Not that I know a real answer, but maybe that also counts: Use function names that don't hide the outer names? :) –  Xeo Mar 31 '11 at 17:35
    
I agree. This is more of a theoretical question. –  detunized Mar 31 '11 at 17:36
    
Sure, and I think it's pretty interesting. +1 for finding that. –  Xeo Mar 31 '11 at 17:39
3  
What happens if you pull the definition of A::f outside class A? What if you pull it all the way out of the anonymous namespace declaration? –  Zack Mar 31 '11 at 17:40
1  
Zack, it works. But I see possible problems with ::A::f, if there's one. –  detunized Mar 31 '11 at 17:45
show 2 more comments

2 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

VC++ 2008 is wrong here. According to the c++03 standard 3.4.3.4:

A name prefixed by the unary scope operator :: (5.1) is looked up in global scope, in the translation unit where it is used. The name shall be declared in global namespace scope or shall be a name whose declaration is visible in global scope because of a using-directive (3.4.3.2). The use of :: allows a global name to be referred to even if its identifier has been hidden (3.3.7).

The important part here is that a using directive in the global namespace will make those symbols accessible with the scope operator.

And according to 7.3.1.1/1, an anonymous namespace is equivalent to:

namespace *unique* { /* empty body */ }
using namespace *unique*;
namespace *unique* { namespace-body }

So between these two sections, the standalone function should be accessible in global namespace.

share|improve this answer
add comment

As academicRobot points out, Visual C++ is wrong. As a workaround, adding an empty unnamed namespace block should resolve the issue (I don't have Visual C++ 2008 to test, but this works in Visual C++ 2010):

// empty unnamed namespace to placate compiler
namespace { }

namespace {
    void f() { }
    struct A {
        void f() { ::f(); }
    };
}

I've reported the issue to the Visual C++ team.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the solution. I just tested it on VS2008 and it works there as well. I accepted the academicRobot's answer though, since it explains in details the problem. Your fix makes perfect sense after his answer. –  detunized Apr 1 '11 at 9:30
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.